LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-27-2014, 10:38 AM   #1156
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 2,963

Rep: Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768

The idea is that a fire next door may spread to you. I obviously don't know the context, but the writer might be making a point like "if nearby countries are at war, make sure you're ready for trouble."
 
Old 01-27-2014, 09:56 PM   #1157
PTrenholme
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: Olympia, WA, USA
Distribution: Fedora, (K)Ubuntu
Posts: 4,147

Rep: Reputation: 330Reputation: 330Reputation: 330Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Alex View Post
Can someone please rephrase “Whenever our neighbour's house is on fire, it cannot be amiss for the engines to play a little on our own”? I can't grasp the meaning of this quote.
Try “Whenever our neighbor's house is on fire, it cannot be amiss for the engines to spray a little [water] on our own [house.]”
 
Old 01-30-2014, 08:39 AM   #1158
Mr. Alex
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Distribution: Arch + X.org + IceWM
Posts: 1,195

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
I obviously don't know the context, but the writer might be making a point like "if nearby countries are at war, make sure you're ready for trouble."
I think it's about sins and mental diseases. Sins and mental diseases if active in our neighbour, will affect us in some way.
 
Old 03-19-2014, 12:30 PM   #1159
P5music
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Posts: 59

Rep: Reputation: 0
Question for english mother tongue users only: "notes" and "annotations"

Hello,
I am not english mother tongue so I would like to know what terms are suitable to describe:
1-notes, 2-highlight, 3-underline, 4-strike through
in applications where user can annotate text (where 1 notes appear as yellow boxes near words and show text when clicked, while 2,3,4 appear as text decorations).
Are 2,3,4 "annotations"? If yes, are they "annotations" also when 1 are explicitly called "notes"? Does it make sense?
If an app is able to manage 1,2,3,4 how to describe 1 and 2,3,4 as two separate categories to the user (like "notes" vs "annotations"?).
First I believed it was right to call 1 "notes" and 2,3,4 "annotations" but now I think it is wrong, isn't it?
I feel it is also ugly to call 2,3,4 "text-decorations".
Here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annotation annotations are considered as marks and marginalia;
here http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/annotate it is pointed out that annotation is from latin notatus (noted or marked).
Only mother tongue users can say how to correctly name the two categories.
Some suggestions?
Thanks in advance
 
Old 03-19-2014, 01:16 PM   #1160
metaschima
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2013
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 958

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
To annotate (verb) means to add a note. A note (noun) is an annotation (noun), they are the same thing.

Highlighting, underlining, and strike-through are NOT annotations or notes. These have to do with the typographical presentation of text, and to add them would be to edit not to annotate.
 
Old 03-19-2014, 08:30 PM   #1161
sundialsvcs
Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 5,263

Rep: Reputation: 1085Reputation: 1085Reputation: 1085Reputation: 1085Reputation: 1085Reputation: 1085Reputation: 1085Reputation: 1085
Refer to 2, 3, 4 as "decorations," since they're things that you can do to "decorate" the words ... the font. Those decorations are intended to be visible when the page is printed.

If you can insert a block of hidden text (analogous to those little yellow adhesive sticky-notes that you can attach to a printed page), those would be "notes." But you could also refer to them as "annotations" because you're in effect attaching them toassociating them with – using them to [i]annotate[/u] ("make a note about") – a particular block of text.

A decoration is truly a property of how the text will appear every time it's printed, whereas an annotation might be called metadata. It's directly associated with a particular spot in the text, but it's not part of the text.
 
Old 03-20-2014, 06:04 AM   #1162
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Hanover, Germany
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 15,424
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996Reputation: 3996
Hello P5music,
your thread has been merged with the English language megathread, please post questions about the English language in that thread only.
 
Old 03-20-2014, 06:28 AM   #1163
Drakeo
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2008
Location: Urbana IL
Distribution: Slackware, Slacko,
Posts: 2,455
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 182Reputation: 182
As a working sometimes less than functional dyslexic. I have struggled with the rude comments in the work field and in this forum. I just let it shine on.
I don't use it as a excuse. But this forum likes to communicate in the English language. I gave up looking for work years ago after leaving college do to this dysfunction of my brain. I just did my own thing and started my own company.

As a good friend of mine ahead of the Language department at the U of I said to a Grad student after being corrected in a vocabulary by the student.

You understood what I was trying to say am I correct ? Yes he answered. Did we speak in English Yes was the Grad students reply. Then we have language
and we used it to communicate. And that is what language is about. Read a Louis L'Amour book once.

I suggest if the world is so anal over a simple form of individual expression get off your back side do your own thing. Stop trying to impress people that are here to communicate. Efin u's noaw's wat I me en.
 
Old 03-20-2014, 07:33 AM   #1164
P5music
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Posts: 59

Rep: Reputation: 0
I see that most applications that enable the user to annotate text, like pdf readers, collectively name notes (like sticky yellow "adesive" notes) and decorations (like underlining) as "annotations".
Maybe it is because many programmers are not english mother tongue. Or maybe it is correct to call notes and decorations together "annotations". I do not know, I am asking here.
Many tutorials or wiki entries about annotating a book uses "annotations" for both types of items. Again, it could be because of the authors being not english mother tongue. In other languages, in fact, words like "annotate" encompass also underlining or drawing arrows, circles, writing marginalia and so on, in addition to "create and attach or link to notes", as a whole process that goes along study.
I feel that underlining, highlighting and striking are sort of acts of annotation. I may be wrong.
My question above (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ml#post5137505 merged here by another user) is about annotations made by the user, not by the creator of the document (i.e. a book), annotations of both types (notes and decorations) that have a unique goal for the reader to add relevant information in various forms.
Thanks in advance
 
Old 03-20-2014, 11:56 AM   #1165
DavidMcCann
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: CentOS, Salix
Posts: 2,963

Rep: Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768Reputation: 768
Annotating means adding a note or an explanation. Adding underlining or a coloured background is emphasising. When a writer quotes a passage and italicises part of it, they'll add a note "my emphasis".
 
Old 03-29-2014, 03:02 PM   #1166
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,535
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999
Could you tell me if the following sentence sounds ok to a native ear? If not, how would you change it? NAME = Name of the company.

Quote:
Do you have the feeling you have seen a picture like the one above before? If so, chances are it was on one of NAME’s walls.
Thank you.
 
Old 03-29-2014, 03:27 PM   #1167
sgosnell
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2008
Location: Baja Oklahoma
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 340

Rep: Reputation: 59
Somewhat stiff, but it's understandable and grammatically correct.
 
Old 03-29-2014, 03:50 PM   #1168
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,535
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
Somewhat stiff, but it's understandable and grammatically correct.
Thank you. Any recommendation to make it less stiff?

It's the beginning of a newsletter article and 'the picture above' is a picture/diagram that is above the article.
 
Old 03-29-2014, 04:22 PM   #1169
metaschima
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2013
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 958

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I'd say:

If you've seen the above picture before, chances are it was on one of NAME's walls.

Shorter, less stiff, more straightforward.
 
Old 03-30-2014, 04:01 AM   #1170
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,535
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999Reputation: 999
Ok. Thank you
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Using KVocTrain to Build Your Foreign Language Vocabulary LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-16-2007 03:21 AM
english spelling/grammar kpachopoulos General 4 11-14-2005 06:18 PM
Proper grammar questions. randyriver10 General 17 08-17-2004 03:14 PM
Can I have english menu with chinese/english/spanish input? codec Linux - General 9 10-04-2003 07:18 PM
Grammar/ Parser questions? JMC Programming 0 06-06-2002 03:18 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:13 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration