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Old 04-01-2012, 06:41 AM   #1006
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Now, instead of discussing the title, could you please help me in the composition?
I'm not a native speaker but I think that the above sentence might sound a bit too direct. I assume you're talking about a photography forum where, like here, members are volunteers and don't like to be told what to discuss. Perhaps, if you removed the "Now, instead of discussing the title" bit, it would sound more polite.

Having said that, it would be helpful to see your sentence in the context.
 
Old 04-01-2012, 07:29 AM   #1007
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It is all here: http://photo.stackexchange.com/quest...-what-happened

It is in comments of the second answer. You have to click "add/show comments" to see "all" talks.

Last edited by TheIndependentAquarius; 04-01-2012 at 07:36 AM.
 
Old 04-01-2012, 09:27 AM   #1008
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Without contet it's difficult to say but, generally, "could you please" is used when you want somebody to do something straight away or to stress that you really want them to do it like "Could you please stop making that noise!". If you want to ask nicely you should probably use "please could you".
Edit: I agree with sycamorex that starting a sentance with "Now" is a little dirrect. Perhaps "Please could we discuss composition now, instead of the title?", or similar, would be more passive.

Last edited by 273; 04-01-2012 at 09:32 AM.
 
Old 04-01-2012, 10:12 PM   #1009
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Is this a bit off subject. Or am I misunderstanding?

You are inclined to abruptness (which I like for I know any discussion with you is going to be lively and interesting.) This abruptness can come accross as bossiness)

There is a possibility that we shall be going to India (close to New Delhi) for a few months

Take care Anisha - from Des

Last edited by Desdd57; 04-02-2012 at 10:37 AM. Reason: Spelling
 
Old 04-02-2012, 06:34 AM   #1010
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
You are inclined to abruptness .... This abruptness comes accross as bossiness
Please then correct that statement to make it look non-abrupt. Or you think what others have suggested is perfect?
 
Old 04-02-2012, 10:25 AM   #1011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Please then correct that statement to make it look non-abrupt. Or you think what others have suggested is perfect?
You wrote :
[QUOTE]Now, instead of discussing the title, could you please help me in the composition? [/QUOTE

]I'm not too good at this but for what it is worth - how about:

"I would really like to hear your thoughts and advice on the composition"

The rest of the sentence is IMHO probably not not needed - uhm! I think

Last edited by Desdd57; 04-02-2012 at 10:31 AM.
 
Old 04-02-2012, 11:44 AM   #1012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
"I would really like to hear your thoughts and advice on the composition"
That's quite nice, and somewhat "too" polite. But, it does make sense to lower the tone down as much as we can when we are "asking" for help! Thanks.
 
Old 04-02-2012, 07:36 PM   #1013
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I checked out the link in your signature. There are some very good photos there - but I don't know how to tell which ones are yours.

If the 3 that first show are yours, then I think you have a talent: I suppose different people may see different messages, for example I particularly like the candles - because it reminds me of how finite we are: which in turn helps to face up to reality

Anyway tell me which photos are yours and I'll put my two pence worth in

Last edited by Desdd57; 04-04-2012 at 03:59 PM. Reason: off subject
 
Old 04-02-2012, 09:49 PM   #1014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
That's quite nice, and somewhat "too" polite.
That's a cultural thing. In India people are generally helpful to each other. In England and English-derived cultures less so. So in India there is no need to dress up a request for help -- you just directly ask for what you want. In English-derived cultures, help is a "favour" so you are more likely to get help if you ask in a way that acknowledges that. I think that is the root of how the behavioural conventions were established. A typical Indian request for help would be regarded as very disrespectful and rude in an English-derived culture. And, vice versa, a normal request for help in a English-derived culture sounds distastefully obsequious to Indian ears.
 
Old 04-03-2012, 03:45 AM   #1015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
That's quite nice, and somewhat "too" polite. But, it does make sense to lower the tone down as much as we can when we are "asking" for help! Thanks.
Perhaps one should write requests in a "too polite" tone - then seek to "abruptise" them a little. Rather than the other way around.

I think that your comment Catkin that it is largely a cultural thing has much merit. Although that will not prevent us from endeavouring to make sure we are polite where possible

Last edited by Desdd57; 04-04-2012 at 04:02 PM. Reason: proper nouns
 
Old 04-05-2012, 10:58 PM   #1016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
A typical Indian request for help would be regarded as very disrespectful and rude in an English-derived culture. And, vice versa, a normal request for help in a English-derived culture sounds distastefully obsequious to Indian ears.
For past few months I have been active on the 1x (writing critiques). I don't prefer to
beat around the bushes and sugar coat statements to make them look soft, and for this I
received an infraction. Mods there said that I was being harsh and rude.
A German Mod there living in India (Tata steel (Jamshedpur)) told me that he didn't
find my critiques too harsh/rude, and I was pleased to hear that till I heard his reasons.
He said that in (Tata steel (Jamshedpur)) all the people are quite rude, and therefore
he's used to rudeness now!!

Well, if he had found some people rude I would have understood it, but if he's finding all
the people rude then perhaps the problem lies somewhere else!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
Perhaps one should write requests in a "too polite" tone...
Being polite is of course nice and compulsory too, but I don't think there is any
need to be "too" polite. The statement which you suggested in the previous post sounds
as if one is "desperate" to get help. I don't want to sound "desperate".
In that particular case, I think I shouldn't have demanded another answer from him.
He would have answered anyway if he wanted to. After all it is a volunteer forum.
BTW, thanks for the appreciation of the photos (I have only 3 of them, there).

Last edited by TheIndependentAquarius; 04-05-2012 at 11:09 PM.
 
Old 04-06-2012, 04:22 AM   #1017
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Is there any particular situation where attaching the in front of a noun makes sense?
 
Old 04-06-2012, 04:36 AM   #1018
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Many, for example "That is the girl I will marry"
 
Old 04-06-2012, 04:40 AM   #1019
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girl is a noun?? Oh, I was talking about "proper" noun.
Anisha is a noun, ah well I was talking about names like "Anisha".
 
Old 04-06-2012, 04:43 AM   #1020
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Example : "Been on the 1x?"
 
  


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