LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 12-04-2010, 10:57 AM   #406
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,563
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeratul View Post
Code:
I will carry my bottles pack
is correct, rather than:
Code:
I will carry my bottle pack
No -- both are correct but the "bottle pack" is so much more natural that "bottles pack" sounds strange. The plural form is only used when the singular form is ambiguous. For example "marbles" are small round balls, used as toys and presumably originally made from marble (stone). If you had a box to keep your marbles in you could say "marble box" but that could mean they box was of marble so it would be natural to say "marbles box".

Last edited by catkin; 12-04-2010 at 11:03 AM.
 
Old 12-04-2010, 11:01 AM   #407
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,563
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179
Quote:
Originally Posted by odiseo77 View Post
Which one of these would be the best?
Both forms can commonly be heard but I find the first easier to understand so prefer it.

BTW, it's better to use CODE tags than QUOTE tags in this thread because they are preserved after hitting the Quote button whereas QUOTE tags and contents are stripped.
 
Old 12-04-2010, 11:17 AM   #408
odiseo77
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Location: Caracas, Venezuela
Distribution: Debian Sid, OpenSUSE 13.1
Posts: 1,019

Rep: Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
Both forms can commonly be heard but I find the first easier to understand so prefer it.
Thanks for the clarification. I also find the first easier to understand (and to say it, if I'm speaking or writing). I thought the second one were more formal because for my job, I have to read a lot of academic articles in english, and I have the idea that the second form is preferred over the first one in these writings, when using phrasal verbs (which sometimes makes some phrases hard to follow when they're too large).


Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
BTW, it's better to use CODE tags than QUOTE tags in this thread because they are preserved after hitting the Quote button whereas QUOTE tags and contents are stripped.
Fixed, thanks for the advice .
 
Old 12-06-2010, 02:11 AM   #409
TheIndependentAquarius
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,633
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897
Quote:
I hope you win lots of verbal stouches.
What does it mean ?
 
Old 12-06-2010, 04:21 AM   #410
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,563
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179
Quote:
Originally Posted by odiseo77 View Post
I have to read a lot of academic articles in english, and I have the idea that the second form is preferred over the first one in these writings
...
when using phrasal verbs
...
And people carry a lot of bottle packs in academic articles?

What's a phrasal verb? I could look it up but it's about time I asked a question in this thread.
 
Old 12-06-2010, 04:24 AM   #411
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,563
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179
Quote:
Originally Posted by anishakaul View Post
What does it mean ?
No such word as stouche AFAIK. Could it be touché, a French word taken into English which can mean to win a point. Context?
 
Old 12-06-2010, 04:29 AM   #412
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,605
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1047Reputation: 1047Reputation: 1047Reputation: 1047Reputation: 1047Reputation: 1047Reputation: 1047Reputation: 1047
Quote:
What's a phrasal verb? I could look it up but it's about time I asked a question in this thread.
It's a verbal group consisting of a verb + (usually) a preposition/adverb.

LOOK FOR as in:
I am looking for my keys.

Mind you, not all verb+preposition/adverb combinations are phrasal verbs, eg.

Can you go up the stairs and check what it was?

Here GO UP is not a phrasal verb as the adverb UP just specifies the direction without modifying the meaning of the main verb.
As opposed to eg, 'look for' where 'look' and 'look for' have completely different meanings.
 
Old 12-06-2010, 04:33 AM   #413
TheIndependentAquarius
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,633
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
No such word as stouche AFAIK.
or it could be slouches ? But what would the sentence mean then ? It is meaningless to discuss this as the exact word is not known
 
Old 12-06-2010, 06:49 AM   #414
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,139
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
That wouldn't make any sense with slouches. Where did you get that phrase from, Anisha? As catkin said "touché" means a winning point, in fencing originally. So I hope you win lots of verbal touches could mean winning points in an argument or debate.
 
Old 12-06-2010, 06:55 AM   #415
TheIndependentAquarius
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,633
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897
I got that phrase in a mail from Australia! I asked "him" its meaning before asking here, "he" wrote back:
Quote:
Stouch is an old English word meaning conflict (I think)
and I couldn't still understand what he meant and
 
Old 12-06-2010, 07:03 AM   #416
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,563
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179Reputation: 1179
Ah! He meant stoush. Probably comes from the sound of hitting someone.
 
Old 12-06-2010, 07:13 AM   #417
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware & Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 7,139
Blog Entries: 52

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by anishakaul View Post
I got that phrase in a mail from Australia!
Ah! Could be an example of Strine.
 
Old 12-07-2010, 05:34 AM   #418
TheIndependentAquarius
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,633
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897
Thx 2 bth f u

What this mean now ?
Quote:
your spirit comes across the ether
What is ether here ?
 
Old 12-07-2010, 05:36 AM   #419
pwc101
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,847

Rep: Reputation: 128Reputation: 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by anishakaul View Post
Thx 2 bth f u

What this mean now ?
Nothing. That means nothing.

If you were being creative, you might say it means "Thank you to both of you".
Quote:
Originally Posted by anishakaul View Post
What is ether here ?
Second definition from http://oxforddictionaries.com/view/entry/m_en_gb0275000
 
Old 12-07-2010, 05:42 AM   #420
TheIndependentAquarius
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,633
Blog Entries: 29

Rep: Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897Reputation: 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwc101 View Post
Nothing. That means nothing.

If you were being creative, you might say it means "Thank you to both of you".
Are you serious here or being sarcastic ? I had written that statement just for poking fun to both those members with whom I have been interacting for quite a while now!

and my question was w.r.t "ether" only.

and I did see that definition of "ether" before but I couldn't understand how it relates to that sentence.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Using KVocTrain to Build Your Foreign Language Vocabulary LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-16-2007 04:21 AM
english spelling/grammar kpachopoulos General 4 11-14-2005 07:18 PM
Proper grammar questions. randyriver10 General 17 08-17-2004 04:14 PM
Can I have english menu with chinese/english/spanish input? codec Linux - General 9 10-04-2003 08:18 PM
Grammar/ Parser questions? JMC Programming 0 06-06-2002 04:18 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:17 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration