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Old 03-30-2014, 11:46 PM   #1171
Xeratul
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I would like to or I want to be astronaut?


Hi,

Some rhetorical question. Shall my kid rather say:
- I would like to be astronaut.
or
- I want to be astronaut.

My kid say what he wants.

However I was just wondering about this distinction...


let us know what you might think about this.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 01:44 AM   #1172
k3lt01
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They are, for all intents and purposes, the exact same in meaning.

If you asked your kid "What would you like to be when you grow up?" they may well mimic your question in their response and say "I would like to be an Astronaut!"
If on the other hand you asked your kid "What do you want to be when you grown up?" they may mimic that version and reply "I want to be an Astronaut!"

Kids respond in ways they hear adults communicate, if you use want instead of would like it is more likely they will say want.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 03:37 AM   #1173
jamison20000e
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Rhetorical aside:

I would think "want" strives for greater desire but as dictates you'd have to be rich or strive yourself?

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...t-here-654375/

Edit: need desire

Last edited by jamison20000e; 03-31-2014 at 10:17 PM.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 08:57 PM   #1174
sgosnell
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Both are correct, it's more a matter of local dialect than anything else. I don't believe this is something worth worrying about.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 09:49 PM   #1175
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And merged with the Megathread.
 
Old 04-02-2014, 06:20 AM   #1176
brianL
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"Want" is, or can be, more demanding than "like to".
Example:
Me to previous tenants of rented house next door (terraced houses) playing very loud (c)rap:
I WANT YOU TO STFU!!!
Excuse me, but as I do not appreciate your taste in music, I would like you to moderate the volume.
 
Old 04-02-2014, 10:06 AM   #1177
jamison20000e
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Want is want, like is for FB. :smiley:
 
Old 05-26-2014, 12:27 PM   #1178
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Hi guys,

In this sentence what do you think could be the meaning of "a thing"?:

Quote:
Google wants to make NFC payments a thing.
I initially thought it was being used with the meaning of "fashion" or "trendy practice", but according to Oxford Dictionaries, in that case it should be "the thing": http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us.../thing?q=thing (definition 4.1). So, I take it it's being used with the connotation of "an established or genuine phenomenon or practice" (definition 3.6 of the previous link). I think both connotations are close to each other, but would like some enlightenment from native speakers anyway.

BTW, I found the sentence in a text I am translating. Although it has been published in another website, I'm not authorised to reproduce the content published in the original source, so I modified it slightly, even though it's just a part of a longer sentence.

So, what do you guys think?

Last edited by odiseo77; 05-26-2014 at 12:31 PM.
 
Old 05-26-2014, 09:59 PM   #1179
maples
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odiseo77 View Post
In this sentence what do you think could be the meaning of "a thing"?
To me, you could replace "a thing" with "something that people do"

Basically, Google wants to make NFC payments popular and wants people to use them.

As I see it, there is a slight (but important) difference between "a thing" and "the thing." Driving a car is "a thing." People drive cars every day. Driving a Ferrari (or any other fancy expensive fast car) is "the thing." Everyone wants to drive a Ferrari.
A (maybe) better example: Owning a smartphone is "a thing." Almost everyone has one. Owning the latest iPhone is "the thing." Once the newest one comes out, lots of people race to the stores just to have the newest iPhone. (which is stupid, in my opinion, but that's another thread...)

I hope this helps! Good luck!
 
Old 05-26-2014, 10:03 PM   #1180
metaschima
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It's slang.
 
Old 05-26-2014, 10:22 PM   #1181
maples
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metaschima View Post
It's slang.
I agree. I should have mentioned that in my original post...
 
Old 05-27-2014, 12:52 PM   #1182
odiseo77
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Thanks for your answers, guys.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maples View Post
To me, you could replace "a thing" with "something that people do"

Basically, Google wants to make NFC payments popular and wants people to use them.

As I see it, there is a slight (but important) difference between "a thing" and "the thing." Driving a car is "a thing." People drive cars every day. Driving a Ferrari (or any other fancy expensive fast car) is "the thing." Everyone wants to drive a Ferrari.
A (maybe) better example: Owning a smartphone is "a thing." Almost everyone has one. Owning the latest iPhone is "the thing." Once the newest one comes out, lots of people race to the stores just to have the newest iPhone. (which is stupid, in my opinion, but that's another thread...)

I hope this helps! Good luck!
That what I guessed after reading the dictionary definition, and makes sense in the context in which the phrase is, so I'll use an equivalent translation. Thanks for the explanation!

Cheers!
 
Old 09-01-2014, 06:47 AM   #1183
odiseo77
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Hi guys,

Is it ok to use 'okay' in a formal email to someone to express agreement? The situation is this, I'm having a job interview and the person who's going to interview me proposed a date and time for the interview. I want to tell them that I agree with making the interview in the date they suggested, but I'm not sure how to do this in a formal way. So, the question is, is the use of 'okay' fine in a formal letter, or are there better options to express agreement formally (without sounding too stiff)?

Thanks for any input!

Last edited by odiseo77; 09-01-2014 at 06:49 AM.
 
Old 09-01-2014, 10:28 AM   #1184
sgosnell
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Usage changes, but I don't think I would use it. There are better words and phrases.
 
Old 09-01-2014, 10:55 AM   #1185
metaschima
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I would use "good" or "fine" instead of "ok" for a formal letter.
 
  


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