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Old 09-23-2012, 11:02 AM   #1081
DavidMcCann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PTrenholme View Post
"You won" is an observation by a non-participant. (And might be better phrased as "You have won.")
Actually, that's a matter of dialect. "You've won" is English, "You won" is (recent) American.
 
Old 09-23-2012, 02:40 PM   #1082
smeezekitty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
Actually, that's a matter of dialect. "You've won" is English, "You won" is (recent) American.
"You've won" or "You have won" sounds good to me.
 
Old 09-26-2012, 05:31 PM   #1083
PTrenholme
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
Actually, that's a matter of dialect. "You've won" is English, "You won" is (recent) American.
True, but the O.P. used the "You won" phrase.

(Liking homonyms, when I hear "You won!" I'm sometimes tempted to reply "You too!")
 
Old 11-09-2012, 02:59 PM   #1084
markush
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Hello,

could please anyone tell my what's the plural of "dictionary"?

Thanks in advance

Markus
 
Old 11-09-2012, 03:33 PM   #1085
odiseo77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markush View Post
Hello,

could please anyone tell my what's the plural of "dictionary"?

Thanks in advance

Markus
"Dictionaries", I guess

(link: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/dictionary).
 
Old 11-09-2012, 03:36 PM   #1086
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Thanks odiseo77, a very helpful link, my favorite-onlinedictionary http://dict.leo.org/ende?lp=ende&lan...h=dictionaries doesn't even know the word.

Markus
 
Old 11-09-2012, 03:49 PM   #1087
odiseo77
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Yeah, it's very useful. It even has buttons to play the pronunciation of the words (either in American English or British English).
 
Old 11-10-2012, 05:19 AM   #1088
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Business: What is the difference between:

Code:
- a reminder

- a memo 

- a note
?

they basically are destined not to forget sthg. I do not see really the difference
 
Old 11-10-2012, 05:33 AM   #1089
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeratul View Post
Business: What is the difference between:

Code:
- a reminder

- a memo 

- a note
?

they basically are destined not to forget sthg. I do not see really the difference
I think it's only a reminder that is strictly used not to forget something. The other two have a wider range of uses with a note being a more generic one. A memo is a note used in a business context.


That's at least my understanding.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 06:00 AM   #1090
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeratul View Post
Business: What is the difference between:

Code:
- a reminder

- a memo 

- a note
?

they basically are destined not to forget sthg. I do not see really the difference
Reminder- "Remember to kill the mother in law"

Note- can also be something you write to someone else. "Cascade rang earlier, and is looking for the chainsaw. Can you please ring him and tell him where it is". Sometimes that is also counted as a memo.

Memo can mean a few things. It can mean 'summarizing the items of an agreement'- "In section 2, clause 15 of the contract it allows me to kill my mother-in-law if it doesnt rain for a month".
 
Old 11-10-2012, 12:05 PM   #1091
DavidMcCann
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Reminder: simply something to prevent yourself or someone else from forgetting. Unlike the others, it isn't necessarily written.

Note: (1) any brief written communication or (2) any brief record.
e.g. "I've sent her a note about it" and "Luckily, I made a note"

Memo (informal form of "memorandum"): A communication sent, often by a superior, to give brief information or instructions.
 
Old 01-07-2013, 04:38 PM   #1092
odiseo77
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Another silly question,

I've often seen this type of phrases (for example when commenting a picture on flickr):

Quote:
I love the mood to this picture
Coming from a Spanish speaking background the next phrase would sound more natural to me in this context:

Quote:
I love the mood in this picture
So, my question is, is any of these phrases better than the other in this context, or do they convey different meanings? What I understand is that the person who says it loves the mood the picture in question has.

Thanks in advance for your answers!

Last edited by odiseo77; 01-07-2013 at 04:40 PM.
 
Old 01-07-2013, 08:51 PM   #1093
NyteOwl
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"I love the mood in this picture" makes sense and indicates the idea you proposed, ie. the person who says it loves the mood the picture in question suggests or implies.

The other phrase, "I love the mood to this picture", while such a construct can sometimes be heard and the speaker generally means the same and the previous phrase, it is grammatically awkward at best and improper at worst.
 
Old 01-07-2013, 09:27 PM   #1094
odiseo77
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Thanks for the clarification, NyteOwl. I've seen the first type of phrase written so commonly on the net, that I started to think it was the right way to say it (though as you say, it sounds really awkward).

Regards.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 02:54 AM   #1095
stf92
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Any substitute key for <TAB> (autocompletion)?

Sorry. I missed the thread.

Last edited by stf92; 01-08-2013 at 03:00 AM.
 
  


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