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Old 10-21-2010, 11:36 PM   #331
TheIndependentAquarius
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When some person dies, we say it as follows:
Quote:
You know, X's father has expired !
Is expired the correct word here ?

I find the following too sharp:
Quote:
You know, X's father has died !
 
Old 10-22-2010, 06:22 AM   #332
H_TeXMeX_H
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I would say 'You know, X's father has passed away !'. Expired is more for consumer goods than people.

Technically, I tend to be blunt, so actually I'd say: He died.
 
Old 10-22-2010, 06:42 AM   #333
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We would tend to use euphemistic expressions to refer to death e.g.

He's gone to meet his maker.
She's gone to a better place.
He's no longer with us.
She's pushing up the daisies.

etc. etc.

I personally would avoid the word DEATH.

This list amused me : I wouldn't use half of the expressions but others might.
http://www.listology.com/rosiecotton...eathdeadto-die
 
Old 10-22-2010, 07:23 AM   #334
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Well, I prefer to avoid euphemisms, such as "passed away". And "expired" is usually for things like TV licenses. But if you feel uncomfortable using "died", say "passed away".
I like that list you linked to, esteeven.

Last edited by brianL; 10-22-2010 at 07:25 AM.
 
Old 10-22-2010, 08:02 AM   #335
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esteeven View Post
He's gone to meet his maker.
She's gone to a better place.
He's no longer with us.
She's pushing up the daisies.
I'm not one to use euphemisms, but I must say that the first 2 are ridiculous ... how can you possibly know ?

#3 is ok.

#4 is more of a joke ... you say this while laughing ...
 
Old 10-22-2010, 09:36 AM   #336
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When speaking of death, I would just say "he/she's gone" or similar. Either that, or I just say, straight out, "he/she/it's dead". I'm not really one to use the religious metaphors, either ("gone to meet his/her maker", etc.).

And then of course there's the old Star Trek one: "He's dead, Jim".

Last edited by MrCode; 10-22-2010 at 09:37 AM.
 
Old 10-22-2010, 10:35 AM   #337
druuna
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Monty python comes to mind

Dead parrot sketch:
Quote:
Mr. Praline: 'E's not pinin'!
'E's passed on!
This parrot is no more!
He has ceased to be!
'E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
'E's a stiff!
Bereft of life, 'e rests in peace!
If you hadn't nailed 'im to the perch 'e'd be pushing up the daisies!
'Is metabolic processes are now 'istory!
'E's off the twig!
'E's kicked the bucket, 'e's shuffled off 'is mortal coil, run down the curtain and joined the bleedin' choir invisibile!!
THIS IS AN EX-PARROT!!
 
Old 10-23-2010, 06:10 AM   #338
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One the Python team missed out:
'E's popped 'is clogs.
 
Old 10-23-2010, 01:13 PM   #339
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My biggest fear of dying and going to hell is I will bump into onebuck... LOL (only joking)
 
Old 10-23-2010, 01:25 PM   #340
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hughetorrance View Post
My biggest fear of dying and going to hell is I will bump into onebuck... LOL (only joking)
LOL
 
Old 10-23-2010, 02:04 PM   #341
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I'm not afraid of death ... in fact, I'm not afraid of anything
 
Old 10-23-2010, 02:36 PM   #342
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Talking fear no evil

Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
I'm not afraid of death ... in fact, I'm not afraid of anything
How about your fear of drawing and publishing your self portrait... LOL

ps you are right to fear no thing... !

Last edited by hughetorrance; 10-23-2010 at 02:38 PM.
 
Old 10-23-2010, 02:44 PM   #343
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hughetorrance View Post
How about your fear of drawing and publishing your self portrait... LOL
But .... the ... the black helicopters ...

Actually, I did draw a self portrait once ... it was psychotic, I drew it partly like a shattered mirror with a large eye in the background. Not sure why I drew it, it just came out that way. I may still have it, or it may be with the art teacher. It was hard to make, I needed a mirror.
 
Old 11-17-2010, 02:37 AM   #344
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Is this statement "Grammatically" correct ?
Quote:
Shakespeare would have faced a tough competition had he been alive today
You will be surprised to know that "expired" is used *very* commonly in India while referring to someone's death No idea why !!
 
Old 11-17-2010, 03:03 AM   #345
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anishakaul View Post
Is this statement "Grammatically" correct ?


You will be surprised to know that "expired" is used *very* commonly in India while referring to someone's death No idea why !!
AFAIK it is perfectly acceptable but the "a" is unnatural and pedantically it should be "Shakespeare would have faced tough competition were he alive today" because the "if" makes the being conditional.

From the Free Dictionary (my bolding): "Usage: Were, as a remnant of the past subjunctive in English, is used in formal contexts in clauses expressing hypotheses (if he were to die, she would inherit everything), suppositions contrary to fact (if I were you, I would be careful), and desire (I wish he were there now). In informal speech, however, was is often used instead".

EDIT: There are many usages in Indian English that differ from English English; they may be direct translation of Indian languages; they may be older forms that were in use in English English but have been dropped from modern English English.

Last edited by catkin; 11-17-2010 at 03:07 AM.
 
  


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