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Old 01-02-2017, 04:07 PM   #31
JockVSJock
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I also know IT Professionals who are "confident in their answers" even if they don't know what they are talking about. They are smooth and say just the right thing or things to get the position, so they get hired.

A few months later, they either quit or get fired because they were able to convince everyone they were the perfect candidate, yet couldn't do the work.

Quote:
Personally, I will give someone a closer look that can communicate during the interview with positive feedback rather than someone who boasts about their certs. Not to say one cannot be proud of their achievements but to do so politely when queried.
I don't understand what you mean here about communicate, please elaborate and give us some examples. Give us some interview tips for IT professionals, as there are so many unfilled positions looking to be filled.

...and I always hear "I'm been screening resumes and interviews for a long time now." Great. How about mentoring, coaching and training those in the lower rungs, as it took me around 14 years to move from entry level IT to Linux System Admin with college degrees and certs, and enthusiasm for the position.

I see such a lack of mentoring and coach in IT. I've reached out a number of times to those in these positions asking for guidance or help and its gone nowhere.

Matter of fact:

https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...th-4175574306/

I asked sundialsvcs career questions before and never got a response.

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
The best way to do that is to buddy-up to someone whose job it is right now to do that: to work alongside them.

Your career path should always strive to leverage what you have already learned, as a vehicle for exposing you to the next thing that you want to know.
While I like what your saying...however in this day and age where everyone is replaceable, I have yet been in a work environment, where I could "buddy-up" with a person a level above me so I could advance to their position. In their eyes, I'm gunning to replace them.

In a previous position, where I worked help desk, I was doing all of the sys admin work, except I didn't have the title or pay. When it came time to promotion, in taking into account all of my degrees, certs, experience and I was doing the sys admin work, I still couldn't get promoted either internally or when I applied outside the company, I didn't have the right experience.

At least with certs, I can setup a lab and from there, lab, lab and lab away.

So let me ask you this. I'm almost two years into my current position as a Linux sys admin and I'm already thinking about the next position, to advance, however I don't know what that is or where it is.

What are your recommendations?

Quote:

I never heard back on this and was curious on how you would answer the question that I've posed.

In my eyes, as someone who is senior, I'm hoping sundialsvcs can give some specific examples career-wise on how to get a foot in the door, and advance from there...

And yes, salary negotiation is the last phase. I hang up on head hunters when the first question they ask me what rate I'm looking for.

Confidence and knowledge comes with years of real world experience, and if you can't get either the knowledge or experience, then it seems to me certs a way to show a potential employer that you can do the job, as long as you didn't dump the exam.

Last edited by JockVSJock; 01-02-2017 at 08:17 PM. Reason: wanted to include sundialsvcs past posts
 
Old 01-03-2017, 06:36 AM   #32
onebuck
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Hi,

I will answer for myself. I have mentored over the years several individuals and find it rewarding for all. I found that when someone would reach out for help or reinforcement then that would open the door for good results for all. No magic bullet here since you are the one who needs to reach out. Unless a superior is assigned to you then it is entirely up to you to handle that by approaching someone within your team to assist in your endeavors.

Myself, I would willingly provide help if I knew that person was willing to work with me and truly had the desires to learn and not be spoon fed. I have found that mentoring is rewarding for all envolved and the company will have success whenever the team achieves a good balance of skills. The company is the reason you are working and you should know what your responsibilities are from the job description. To work outside of that job description can be dangerous for everyone. Be sure to meet the job description requirements first and when you need help within that area then do request help and does not show weakness but the desire to achieve your tasks. Even if the request would seem to be a basic requirement, you should be clear as to your reason for requesting help or assistance.

Biggest problem is a person who oversells their abilities. Be true to yourself and everyone around you. If you are not able to do a task or question what the task is actually defined as then ask someone. To shy away from tasks can be damaging but when you are true about your abilities most good admins will know when to step in to aid someone.
Quote:

"Knowledge is of two kinds. We Know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it."- Samuel Johnson
Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
 
Old 01-03-2017, 08:47 AM   #33
JockVSJock
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I was hoping to hear back from sundialsvcs, as I keep asking him to respond in various posts, however I'm glad you responded.

However...been there and done that.

You talk about responsibilities of a job description. As a person going on three years of Linux Sys Admin and wanting to advance, a typical IT job description will have something like this:

Quote:
Must have the following experience

- 3 to 5 years of Linux Admin
- 5 to 7 years of Hypervisor
- Knowledge of networking (routing, switching, firewalls, SDN) along with IPv6 implementations
- Must know how to script (Perl, Python, Bash)
- Must be able to secure both Linux physical and virtual servers along with virtual machines
- Heavy Experience with DevOps
- Knowledge of Containers (Docker)
- Solid understanding of procurement process of hardware/software
- Knowledge of project management
- Able to understand business process and write documentation for others to use
- Soft skills with C Level Management, other internal departments and external vendors

There is no way a person has all of this experience, however you have been unemployed for awhile and you need work.

How would you prepare to interview for a job like this?

As for mentoring, I'm the only Linux Sys Admin where I work and I don't interact with other Linux Sys Admins, especially those who have more skills or knowledge them me, other then online, like this forum. I've reached out to others about mentoring and I never get a response. I'm curious on what is the best way to approach this. I've already expressed that most folks won't mentor because if you train someone up, its possible that person could become your replacement.
 
Old 01-03-2017, 11:53 AM   #34
lazydog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Not always this way. It depends on ones preparedness for that particular job or interview. I know admins that can work circles around guys who have degrees or certifications. How one handles their self when speaking to a qualified interviewer means a lot and will weigh just as much as to the weight of degrees or certs.
Sorry but HR filter will get your resume tossed or pushed to the bottom if you don't have a degree or cert when they are looking for someone with a degree or cert. You cannot get to the interview if you don't pass HR checks. And if you lie then you will be booted anyway. So it all comes down the the hiring company/manager and what they are willing to accept.
 
Old 01-04-2017, 11:26 AM   #35
onebuck
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Member response

Hi,

Most HR dept will rely on the dept that is looking for someone to fill the position. I have yet to meet a HR individual who could or would know how or whom to fill the position on just criteria levels. So resume will pass through the upper level Admins for their input to who to call for interviews.Some HR in larger firms will have company tech representative on staff via committee. Larger companies may use head hunters to fill their requests but those too will generally end up with the departments admins/supervisor.

Most resumes that I have thrown out were cookbook generated and would never reach the interview. Resume writing is a skill set that some people will not have therefore fall into using canned packages or generators.

I personally have met very successful Admins that do not have a degree and would cert after a supervisor requested after working for a period with the company. Blanket statements that one must be certified or have a degree is not always true for everyone. Personal networks do help people find good jobs that they are qualified to perform the tasks within the company. I have recommended several people for positions that they were qualified to perform the assigned task(s). Several surpassed expectations and did move up within the company. Of course you had better know the person you are recommending since you will have some skin in the game.

Hope this helps.
 
  


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