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Old 05-01-2006, 10:48 AM   #46
egag
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merchtemeagle
Wherefore should /boot be ext2 ?
to add to the answer allready given...

the /boot dir is allmost used as readonly.
you only write there when placing a new kernel.

and i believe a journal needs about 32MB
so you also save some space with ext2.

egag
 
Old 05-01-2006, 11:05 AM   #47
merchtemeagle
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So what would be the easiest way to change my current /boot partition from ReiserFS to ext2?
 
Old 05-01-2006, 11:26 AM   #48
Penguin of Wonder
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Ouch, my guess is you'd have to use a liverun like Knoppix to redo it. If I were you I wouldn't worry about it till I decieded to upgrade or reinstall. Your not really hurting yourself by having /boot as reiser. Just wasting alittle extra space, which you wouldn't be using anyway because like egag said, you only write to your /boot when you install a new kernel.
 
Old 05-01-2006, 11:27 PM   #49
Old_Fogie
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So let me see if I get this right then. If I were to reload slackware, I should run the cfdisk, let it wipe out my hda2 (which is my current " / " root partition my home's are there too) and use the CFDISK to make it reiser then, and just go thru my slack setup.

Or should i be making a partition as ext2 for /boot stuff only and a whole different partition for my / root directory and my homes?

The documentation is really confusing on this, sorry to steal the thread
 
Old 05-01-2006, 11:32 PM   #50
Penguin of Wonder
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Here's a good layout, you can pick the sizes though:

Code:
/dev/hda1   /boot   ext2
/dev/hda2   /swap   swap
/dev/hda3   /root   reiserfs
/dev/hda4   /home   reiserfs
If you want more paritions than that, thats fine too. I know most slackware users set thiers up with seperate /var, /tmp, etc.

One last recomendation, your /boot should be no more than 50M max.
 
Old 05-02-2006, 10:46 AM   #51
Old_Fogie
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thank you
 
Old 05-02-2006, 11:38 AM   #52
gargamel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penguin of Wonder
Ouch, my guess is you'd have to use a liverun like Knoppix to redo it...
Or SLAX, if you want to stick with what you love... ;-)

http://www.slax.org

(No flame, Knoppix is great, but SLAX is good, too).

gargamel
 
Old 05-02-2006, 11:38 AM   #53
mike160
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Whats the advantage of having diiferent file systems and/or seperate partions for different directories ???
 
Old 05-02-2006, 11:44 AM   #54
gargamel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsiu
A few general questions: 1. How often is Slackware released? Is it updated roughly every 6 months or when the team feels like it? 2. How many people is actually on the Slackware team? Does Patrick Volkerding do all the work himself? I was told that Slackware was a one-man show, I was wondering if the statement was literal?
1. Both: Roughly every 6 months, when the team leader feels like it. 2. Pat V. is making all the decisions, based on technical reasons, as opposed to marketing reasons, but he listens to users and is always willing to accept proper patches and good ideas from helpful contributors. In short: There's only a very small team dedicated to maintain Slackware, but there's always the Bazaar model, with contributors passing by and dropping their stuff for use in the distribution. The number of 'visitors' is unknown. But then: Slackware is the 'purest' Linux around in the sense that it avoids vendor patches; from that perspective almost everyone contributing to Linux is contributing to Slackware, making a total estimated number of roughly 25,000 developers. Calming, isn't it? gargamel
 
Old 05-02-2006, 05:15 PM   #55
Penguin of Wonder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike160
Whats the advantage of having diiferent file systems and/or seperate partions for different directories ???
Well we've already discused why you use ext2 for /boot. The biggest reason i'm aware of for putting different directories on sepearte paritions is for security reasons. For example, since /boot is alone, and shouldn't be automounted at boot, it helps protect your boot sector from being compromised by viruses. Something Windows suffers some. Also another thing, if you keep your /home seperate, that makes it really easy to upgrade without losing all your precious data. /root is kept sepearte for many of the same reasons that /boot is. Though /root has to be mounted for your system to run. Which is why we have file permissions.
 
Old 05-02-2006, 06:10 PM   #56
dkpw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gargamel
But then: Slackware is the 'purest' Linux around in the sense that it avoids vendor patches; from that perspective almost everyone contributing to Linux is contributing to Slackware, making a total estimated number of roughly 25,000 developers. Calming, isn't it? gargamel
A great idea, well expressed.

I feel calm.
 
Old 05-09-2006, 08:43 PM   #57
Old_Fogie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penguin of Wonder
Here's a good layout, you can pick the sizes though:

Code:
/dev/hda1   /boot   ext2
/dev/hda2   /swap   swap
/dev/hda3   /root   reiserfs
/dev/hda4   /home   reiserfs
If you want more paritions than that, thats fine too. I know most slackware users set thiers up with seperate /var, /tmp, etc.

One last recomendation, your /boot should be no more than 50M max.
I have a 60 gig drive that I want to play and reload slackware 10.2 with, especially seeing how fast reiser is on an old pc I have here for data drives, I can only imagine how much better it would be on my faster pc.

Would these sizes be okay? Based on what you have above for my 60 gig drive?

Code:
/dev/hda1   /boot   ext2   <----I should be 50 meg here max
/dev/hda2   /swap   swap         <----I have 1 Gig of ram in the pc so I do 800 meg here
/dev/hda3   /root   reiserfs     <-----Not sure really what size this should be in gig.
/dev/hda4   /home   reiserfs <---I guess the rest of the hard drive.
With /var and /tmp <--I've heard of people crashing if not enough room so I think I just put them in with /home as it defaults for now.
 
Old 05-09-2006, 08:58 PM   #58
merchtemeagle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Fogie
With /var and /tmp <--I've heard of people crashing if not enough room so I think I just put them in with /home as it defaults for now.
Hmm, what do you mean, putting /var and /tmp in /home?
 
Old 05-09-2006, 09:04 PM   #59
Old_Fogie
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Sorry I meant leaving them in the "/" folder as it defaults too.
 
Old 05-09-2006, 09:07 PM   #60
merchtemeagle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Fogie
Sorry I meant leaving them in the "/" folder as it defaults too.
You mean leaving them on the same partition as "/" ?
They are always under the "/" directory.

Besides, if they are full, leaving them on the same partition will crash your system. Putting them on another one will still allow you to keep your system up.
 
  


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