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Old 08-17-2011, 10:55 PM   #811
SigTerm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
What is the meaning of "vet" in the following quote?
Although I normally see "vet" being used as "veterenarian", apparently it has extra meaning.

vet:
Quote:
to appraise, verify, or check for accuracy, authenticity, validity, etc.: An expert vetted the manuscript before publication.
Also, my own question:

Is it possible to say "cat washes its face" in english using only TWO words? I.e. "cat ...(place a verb here)..."? I can't remember an english verb that means "wash one's face". Maybe there's another expression for cats (like "making muffins" for kneading)?

Last edited by SigTerm; 08-17-2011 at 10:59 PM.
 
Old 08-17-2011, 11:05 PM   #812
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
Although I normally see "vet" being used as "veterenarian", apparently it has extra meaning.

vet:
Thanks, I thought vet meant the short form for doctor of animals,
I have that dictionary link too, should have searched there before.
 
Old 08-18-2011, 08:36 AM   #813
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
Although I normally see "vet" being used as "veterenarian", apparently it has extra meaning.

vet:

Quote:
to appraise, verify, or check for accuracy, authenticity, validity, etc.: An expert vetted the manuscript before publication.
As a noun, "vet" is a commonly-used short form of both "veterinarian" and "veteran," though you should be able to tell the difference in context. The definition given above is the verb form, which is correct for the original question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
Also, my own question:

Is it possible to say "cat washes its face" in english using only TWO words? I.e. "cat ...(place a verb here)..."? I can't remember an english verb that means "wash one's face". Maybe there's another expression for cats (like "making muffins" for kneading)?
Unless "cat washes its face" is an idiom I'm not familiar with that has a two-word equivalent, I'd say no.
 
Old 09-01-2011, 12:07 AM   #814
TheIndependentAquarius
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Code:
For few moments I thought you were sleepy.
OR
Code:
For few moments I thought you were feeling sleepy.
Which one is more appropriate?
 
Old 09-01-2011, 12:18 AM   #815
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Quote:
Which one is more appropriate?
…depends on the context. For example, your first one is a more objective statement (if "objective" can be applied to a term like "sleepy" ), whereas your second one is indicating more of a subjective view (you thought the one you were addressing might have felt sleepy, without necessarily actually being sleepy).

I hope that makes some kind of sense…the way I put it might not have been the most ideal.
 
Old 09-01-2011, 02:30 AM   #816
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Code:
For a few moments I thought you were feeling sleepy.
You missed the "a".
 
Old 09-01-2011, 02:33 AM   #817
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Need an "a" before few, like so:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Code:
For a few moments I thought you were sleepy.
OR
Code:
For a few moments I thought you were feeling sleepy.
Which one is more appropriate?
Beaten to it by Caravel. Faster typers should be banned!

Last edited by brianL; 09-01-2011 at 02:35 AM.
 
Old 09-01-2011, 02:34 AM   #818
TheIndependentAquarius
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Okay, understood about "a". Now, what
about the word "feeling"? Is that needed?
BTW, the statement was meant to be a pun.
 
Old 09-01-2011, 02:39 AM   #819
brianL
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"feeling" isn't really needed, but it's not wrong to put it there. And it was meant as a joke, not exactly a pun.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pun
 
Old 09-01-2011, 02:44 AM   #820
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What is exactly called a "friendly" sarcasm?

The dict. says:
Code:
the humorous use of a word or phrase so as to emphasize or suggest its different meanings or applications, or the use of words that are alike
So, by "sleepy" I hinted that he was being
absent minded. Isn't that still a pun?
 
Old 09-01-2011, 02:56 AM   #821
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No a pun, is when a play on words that are phonetically similar eg:

Quote:
Originally Posted by internet
He kept an alarm clock in the back window of his car. He was always ahead of his time.
 
Old 09-01-2011, 03:23 AM   #822
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phil.d.g View Post
No a pun, is when a play on words that are phonetically similar eg:
Which words are phonetically similar in the example?
 
Old 09-01-2011, 03:29 AM   #823
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Ronnie Barker has an excellent guide to English pronunciation here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJ0nFQgRApY
and also
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdMZZ...eature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moDPm...eature=related

floppy

Last edited by floppywhopper; 09-01-2011 at 03:39 AM.
 
Old 09-01-2011, 03:29 AM   #824
TheIndependentAquarius
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Okay, will that sleepy statement be called
a "tongue in cheek"?

I somehow used to think all this while that
a pun, and a tongue in cheek
are sort of "friendly" sarcasms, which are
not meant to be hurtful.
 
Old 09-01-2011, 03:37 AM   #825
phil.d.g
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
Which words are phonetically similar in the example?
None.

It made sense in my mind at the time. What I should of said is a pun is the use of a phrase to mean one thing, but is usually taken to mean something else. Example still stands.
 
  


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