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Old 02-14-2011, 06:18 AM   #661
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Which one of these will fit now?
or
Code:
Which one of these would fit now?
If You say the first one is correct, that would/will mean 'would' is used when we are talking about past in the future?
 
Old 02-14-2011, 06:34 AM   #662
sycamorex
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IMO you could use either.

Quote:
If You say the first one is correct, that would/will mean 'would' is used when we are talking about past in the future?
Not really, when we refer to the past in the future we use normal past forms of verbs, eg.

Quote:
I'm sure next week you will tell me that I *was* wrong.
 
Old 02-14-2011, 06:37 AM   #663
TheIndependentAquarius
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Can you/someone just point me the link describing the usages of would/will? I need to know the exact rules and regulations.

EDIT: Or I should search it out myself perhaps
 
Old 02-14-2011, 06:57 AM   #664
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Can you/someone just point me the link describing the usages of would/will? I need to know the exact rules and regulations.

EDIT: Or I should search it out myself perhaps
Yeah, modal verbs are quite confusing and complex and it's best to learn them in a systematic way.
The materials on the internet don't usually cover the topic in depth.

If you can borrow (perhaps your local library) the following book, please do.
Thomson-Martinet: A Practical English Grammar
It looks a bit like a manual page, but it's very detailed and clearly explains the English grammar.
You can read it on the internet but there's something seriously wrong with this version. It's hardly
readable due to the lack of line spaces and other formatting elements.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/6661327/A-...omson-Martinet

I'd recommend getting a hard copy.

Have fun
 
Old 02-14-2011, 07:07 AM   #665
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Thanks for the effort, sycamorex, I found something interesting too: http://wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html

from Nylex's signature.

Last edited by TheIndependentAquarius; 02-14-2011 at 07:10 AM.
 
Old 02-14-2011, 09:03 AM   #666
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Thanks for the effort, sycamorex, I found something interesting too: http://wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html

from Nylex's signature.

You may want to take a look at http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_th...the_word_would.


IMHO, neither form would raise eyebrows during everyday conversation, but 'will' would be the better choice. But context and exact phrasing has a large impact on the decision on which to use.
 
Old 03-12-2011, 01:39 PM   #667
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Hi there,

Which version sounds best:

1. Solar panels let us save between 50% and 60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually.
2. Solar panels let us save between 50% and 60% of domestic hot water production costs annually.
3. Solar panels let us save from 50% to 60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually.
4. Solar panels let us save from 50% to 60% of domestic hot water production costs annually.

Any other modifications are welcome.

Thanks
 
Old 03-12-2011, 02:26 PM   #668
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
Hi there,

Which version sounds best:

1. Solar panels let us save between 50% and 60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually.
2. Solar panels let us save between 50% and 60% of domestic hot water production costs annually.
3. Solar panels let us save from 50% to 60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually.
4. Solar panels let us save from 50% to 60% of domestic hot water production costs annually.

Any other modifications are welcome.

Thanks
Solar panels save us from 50% to 60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually.

IMHO.
 
Old 03-12-2011, 04:50 PM   #669
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It may be even more correct to say:
Solar panels save us from 50-60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually.

But it depends on whether it's spoken or written.
 
Old 03-12-2011, 05:23 PM   #670
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XavierP View Post
It may be even more correct to say:
Solar panels save us from 50-60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually.

But it depends on whether it's spoken or written.
It's a website.
 
Old 03-12-2011, 06:51 PM   #671
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In that case, I think "Solar panels can save between 50-60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually".
 
Old 03-12-2011, 07:03 PM   #672
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Thanks all.
 
Old 03-12-2011, 07:21 PM   #673
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XavierP View Post
In that case, I think "Solar panels can save between 50-60% of domestic hot water production related costs annually".
This won't do! "between" needs to be coupled with "and", so you can have "save between 50 and 60 percent" or "save 50-60%"; your sentence is a classic case of changing horses in midstream.

The sentence is also made clumsy by using a huge qualifier (domestic hot water production related) before the noun, which is un-idiomatic in any language, and by redundant words. So

"Solar panels can save 50-60% of the cost of domestic hot water."
 
Old 03-12-2011, 09:27 PM   #674
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Good point on the between part. Not sure about your sentence shortening - it may be a website for a manufacturer or trade supplier.
 
Old 03-12-2011, 09:45 PM   #675
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The site is highly technical - it's a manufacturer's website.
 
  


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