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Old 07-03-2011, 09:03 PM   #781
SigTerm
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WARNING: not a native english speaker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
How would you (in simple terms) explain the meaning of the word 'drive' as in 'a driven individual'? Thanks
"driven" == "motivated" (by something).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Can "mobilized" be considered? i.e. A mobilized man?
AFAIK, "mobilize" is normally applied to troops/army (or people in political campaigns?). "to be mobilized" almost sounds like "to be drafted into army and sent to frontline" (although it isn't the actual meaning), I definitely wouldn't use it in this case,
 
Old 07-03-2011, 10:15 PM   #782
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SigTerm View Post
AFAIK, "mobilize" is normally applied to troops/army (or people in political campaigns?). "to be mobilized" almost sounds like "to be drafted into army and sent to frontline" (although it isn't the actual meaning), I definitely wouldn't use it in this case,
Yes, that sounds sound. (is that a correct English now? ;D)
 
Old 07-03-2011, 11:37 PM   #783
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Quote:
is that a correct English now?
Technically yes, but I personally would've used something like "Yes, that seems sound." or "Yes, that sounds good.".
 
Old 07-04-2011, 12:08 AM   #784
frenchn00b
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"it sounds good" is also right

and
"it sounds fine"?

Last edited by frenchn00b; 07-04-2011 at 12:09 AM.
 
Old 07-04-2011, 12:23 AM   #785
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrCode View Post
Technically yes, but I personally would've used something like "Yes, that seems sound." or "Yes, that sounds good.".
I actually liked using two nearly same words having altogether different meanings i.e. sounds sound. I thought that would make it an interesting statement.
 
Old 07-14-2011, 04:48 AM   #786
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What do you call a man who's nature is opposite of aggressive?

The words I am thinking are:

Tender
Docile
Gentle
Subtle


Not sure which one fits right?
 
Old 07-14-2011, 04:51 AM   #787
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Hi,

That depends on the context.

Here are a few opposites of aggressive:
- passive
- defensive
- friendly
- submissive

Last edited by druuna; 07-14-2011 at 05:19 AM. Reason: grammar
 
Old 07-14-2011, 04:54 AM   #788
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Passive and defensive don't fit right. I am talking of someone who has a jolly nature and doesn't get offended easily.
 
Old 07-14-2011, 05:02 AM   #789
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
The words I am thinking are:

Tender
Docile
Gentle
Subtle
None of those words fit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
What do you call a man who's nature is opposite of aggressive?

Not sure which one fits right?
calm, peaceful, tolerant, easy going, laid back, friendly. Or you could cheat and use "non-agressive"

When you need synonym/antonyms, use google - it'll quickly direct you to relevant thesaurus/dictionary site. I'd also advise to avoid translating words from your language into english, becuase it is quite possible that meaning of translated word won't *excatly* match original meaning.
 
Old 07-14-2011, 11:08 PM   #790
TheIndependentAquarius
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Thanks SigTerm,

"Laid back" is the exact word that fits in, IMO.
I looked up its synonyms in thesaurus . com which says:
Quote:
easygoing, lax, low-pressure, mellow, undemanding, unhurried
All these words fit in just too well!
 
Old 07-15-2011, 05:01 AM   #791
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I haven't read through the whole thread, so if this has been posted I apologize. This always makes me laugh..
I before E
 
Old 07-15-2011, 07:26 AM   #792
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Quote:
Anisha: What do you call a man who's nature is opposite of aggressive?

The words I am thinking are:

Tender
Docile
Gentle
Subtle


Not sure which one fits right?
You call him "Des" (Just joking of course)

He could also be called:

Timid
Diplomatic
Meek (Note "Meek" does not infer a coward or weak, but one of quiet strength and purpose, yet thinking nothing great of himself)
 
Old 07-15-2011, 09:33 AM   #793
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
You call him "Des" (Just joking of course)
Nice to know that you are still alive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desdd57 View Post
He could also be called:
Timid
AFAIK, timid means one who doesn't have the courage to raise his voice.

Quote:
Diplomatic
This means, one who knows how to act/speak according to the situation.
 
Old 07-15-2011, 10:17 AM   #794
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
AFAIK, timid means one who doesn't have the courage to raise his voice.
Right; from Latin timere, to fear.
 
Old 07-15-2011, 10:38 AM   #795
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Hello,

I found this thread by chance

Here my question: what is the difference between the words "what" and "which".

For me it looks "more correct" to write "Which distribution should I use?" but as far as I see most (native englishspeaking) members here at LQ would write "What distribution should I use?".

Is there any rule when one has to use "what" or "which" or do they mean the same?

Markus
 
  


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