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Old 12-10-2017, 12:34 PM   #31
wdarledge
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Talking now, THAT is what I'm talkin' bout....


Quote:
Originally Posted by lighter973 View Post
You're not the black sheep, I am
Hahahaha......nice~~~~ )
 
Old 12-10-2017, 12:38 PM   #32
wdarledge
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by TracyTiger View Post
Repeating Richard Cranium's response in a previous post. You didn't actually type the commands but assumed you knew what the result would be. Linux/Unix is not MS DOS.

I believe you are mixing up the current working directory with the home directory. They are not the same.

The cd commands (without arguments) changes the current working directory to the user's home directory. Each user account has its own home directory.



You may benefit from a basic tutorial on Linux. Perhaps someone else has a link pointing to a good basic tutorial. With a better understanding of some of the basics you would be less frustrated.

YES, i guess I have been trying NOT to do that.....flying by the seat of my pants has gotten me this far, which is a working Linux box and no idea of how to effectively use it

")!! i am completely overwhelmed now, which is what I was hoping not to be by all of these tutorials. shoot, I wasn't doing anything else today anyway~~~ )))

thanks for your replies, they are helpful and I appreciate it.
David
 
Old 12-10-2017, 12:48 PM   #33
wdarledge
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelk View Post
It should be
Code:
~/.local/share/Trash
The dot/period indicates a hidden directory.
hold it ...!!!

are you saying that, wait... so ~ = Home Directory, not in just slang, but for real in the Linux command structure~! I guess I have to STOP using it for an exclamation

point then in here! ) also,

then, ~/.local/share/Trash = a hidden "local" directory in the folder structure under the "Home" parent directory? so, /root = Home so, ~/.local is a hidden folder in /root?

don't worry about answering my confusion. it is better to let a drowning person to wear themselves out first before attempting a rescue or they will drag you down with them!

you and RichardCranium have done an exlemprary job of getting to the problem ---- i don't really understand the file structure of Linux!!! RichardCranium has given me

a few reads, and since I am the anal type, that is just what I intend to do.

Thank you for sticking with me to get me to this point. As I said earlier, this is "exactly" what I was trying to avoid. Not because I don't like to study but, "I" like to

choose what to learn, not what I need to learn choosing me! That is too much like College. And other than IIKA, and girls, College was a major DRAG!!!

Anyway, thank you!
David A.
 
Old 12-10-2017, 01:10 PM   #34
wdarledge
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
To go a bit further on TracyTiger's post. Each user will typically have their home directory in /home/ under their username. So, for you, it would be /home/wdarledge/ and for me it would be /home/bassmadrigal/. The major exception to that rule (that you'd use) is the root account. Root's home directory is /root/.

When you are logged in as any user, if you type cd and press enter, The shell will return you to your home directory.

The home directory has a shortcut, and that's the tilde (~). If you type the tilde by itself, it is the same as typing /home/wdarledge/. So, you can access the home directory 3 different ways: cd, cd ~, and cd /home/wdarledge/ So, if you needed to access the trash folder that they've been mentioning, you can access it from anywhere in the system by using ~/.local/share/Trash/ or /home/wdarledge/.local/share/Trash/

If you want to access another user's home directory (let's say mine), you can use the tilde with the username right after it... like ~bassmadrigal/.local/share/Trash/, however, this is usually only beneficial as root, since permissions would prevent wdarledge from accessing bassmadrigal's home directory.

Two other things to be aware of is the . and .. "folders". A single period indicates the current directory and the double period is the parent directory. That is why you will sometimes see people to use ./random-command to run "random-command" (being whatever command you want to run).

Hopefully this helped a bit and didn't make things more confusing. Feel free to ask any other questions if you need more clarification.

this is "WAY" helpful ..... the . and the .. "folders" i am familiar with as a way to cd.. to get back to root in Windows, apparently, same here in Linux.

also, the ~ being = Home directory is very, very useful, thanks!

when i logout i see david login: so, david is machine name then. that means that means when I see root@david:~# that means that david is higher in the

parent/sibling structure than /root ! so, username = computer name ?? and when you type /home/bassmadrigal that means really /bassmadrigal/home or

/bassmadrigal/root ?? so, when you type file structure, you type them "backwards"?? oh GOD ...


in Windows, you give the machine a name. then you create a user- primary user. you log into the desktop, then open command and it gives you C:\

here, in LInux, you create a Primary User on installation. That effectively becomes BOTH! the machine name and the 1st user? then root@david is really /david/root !!

is this correct?

am i retarded? am I making too big of a deal about it? to me, it seems pretty "essential" that I understand this point!

thanks for your help,
david
 
Old 12-10-2017, 01:15 PM   #35
wdarledge
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_filesystem contains some information that you might find useful about how the file system is put together.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filesy...archy_Standard is what most Linux systems follow.

...give me the afternoon, both of these will be read before Sunset.

unless they are bigger than I can swallow in one day. then, I don't know. 2weeks minimum.

you have my word I will "Study to show myself approved"!

david
 
Old 12-10-2017, 03:48 PM   #36
bassmadrigal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wdarledge View Post
when i logout i see david login: so, david is machine name then. that means that means when I see root@david:~# that means that david is higher in the

parent/sibling structure than /root ! so, username = computer name ?? and when you type /home/bassmadrigal that means really /bassmadrigal/home or

/bassmadrigal/root ?? so, when you type file structure, you type them "backwards"?? oh GOD ...
No, in this context, david is your computer name and has nothing to do with users on the computer. You can check and see what your hostname/computer name is by simply typing hostname. The david login: is asking you to type the username you want to log into the computer named "david". Once logged in, the prompt, by default, is set to say "your username"@"your computername", so it meant you were root, logged onto the machine called david, or root *at* david. If I were to log in (assuming I had an account), it would say bassmadrigal@david. But you can change this to display whatever you want using the PS1 variable, however, that will be beyond the scope of this post. By default, it will show username@computername current-directory: (the current directory will be replaced by ~ if you're in that user's home directory). So, if you were root and in /root/, it would show:

Code:
root@david ~:
If you were root in wdarledge's home folder, it would show:

Code:
root@david /home/david:
If you didn't intend for your computer to be named "david", you might've mistaken the installer prompt to name your computer as a way to create a user. Well, Slackware's installer doesn't prompt for you to create a user and will only allow you to setup the password for root. Once the installer is complete, you reboot and then once you log in as root, you can then begin customizing your system, including adding any additional users (easy to do using the adduser script). If you want to change the name of the computer, you can do by running the netconfig script as root.

And all created users other than root will have their home directories physically under the /home/ directory with a subdirectory of their username. So, for me, it would be /home/bassmadrigal/ (you can change that to be whatever directory you want, but that's the default and almost everyone sticks with it unless they have a strong reason not to, or it's a user account for a system user, which may not even have a home directory).

If you want to see all the user accounts and their home directories, you can view it in /etc/passwd. This is kinda like a text-based database. The various entries are separated by a colon. The first entry is the username, the second is a placeholder for the password, but that's no longer stored in this file. The third is the user ID or UID (in Slackware, the regular user IDs start at 1000, with the remaining being reserved for system users). The fourth is the group ID or GID. Most regular users will be assigned to the users group which has a GID of 100. The fifth section is typically the comment field, but can sometimes be used to store the user's full name, if added. The sixth field is finally the one that will show the user's home directory. The seventh and final field will show the user's default shell, typically /bin/bash.

So, now for an example of my main user's entry in my computer's passwd file.

Code:
jbhansen:x:1000:100:Jeremy Brent Hansen,,,:/home/jbhansen:/bin/bash
So, my username is jbhansen, my UID is 1000, and my GID is 100. My full name is listed in there (the commas are extra separators of the comment field added by the adduser command -- they can be ignored here). My home directory (~jbhansen) is /home/jbhansen, and I use /bin/bash as my shell.

You can use man 5 passwd to view the manpage on the /etc/passwd file.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wdarledge View Post
in Windows, you give the machine a name. then you create a user- primary user. you log into the desktop, then open command and it gives you C:\

here, in LInux, you create a Primary User on installation. That effectively becomes BOTH! the machine name and the 1st user? then root@david is really /david/root !!

is this correct?
No, hopefully the above cleared this up a bit. root is the only example of a user (that you'll use -- there's actually a lot system users that you'll never log in with) who does not have a home directory under the /home/ folder. root's home folder, by default, is under /root/.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wdarledge View Post
am i retarded? am I making too big of a deal about it? to me, it seems pretty "essential" that I understand this point!
No worries about this. We all had to start somewhere. I was lucky in that I started with Linux in a college class back in like 2001, where we were only allowed to be at the console the whole class (I think it was 2-3 months). If anyone was caught starting X (the GUI that allows you to use the mouse), it would have a large effect on your grade. The class was great because it taught me to be comfortable in the CLI (command line interface, basically the console where you type your commands). I hope that we cleared some confusion up, but feel free to continue asking questions and/or clarifying if certain examples are accurate.

EDIT: Sorry for the ton of text. I didn't realize how much it was until I posted it. Hopefully I didn't dump too much on you.

Last edited by bassmadrigal; 12-10-2017 at 03:54 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-10-2017, 06:18 PM   #37
wdarledge
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Cool brand-new Maserati's ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
No, in this context, david is your computer name and has nothing to do with users on the computer. You can check and see what your hostname/computer name is by simply typing hostname. The david login: is asking you to type the username you want to log into the computer named "david". Once logged in, the prompt, by default, is set to say "your username"@"your computername", so it meant you were root, logged onto the machine called david, or root *at* david. If I were to log in (assuming I had an account), it would say bassmadrigal@david. But you can change this to display whatever you want using the PS1 variable, however, that will be beyond the scope of this post. By default, it will show username@computername current-directory: (the current directory will be replaced by ~ if you're in that user's home directory). So, if you were root and in /root/, it would show:

Code:
root@david ~:
If you were root in wdarledge's home folder, it would show:

Code:
root@david /home/david:
If you didn't intend for your computer to be named "david", you might've mistaken the installer prompt to name your computer as a way to create a user. Well, Slackware's installer doesn't prompt for you to create a user and will only allow you to setup the password for root. Once the installer is complete, you reboot and then once you log in as root, you can then begin customizing your system, including adding any additional users (easy to do using the adduser script). If you want to change the name of the computer, you can do by running the netconfig script as root.

And all created users other than root will have their home directories physically under the /home/ directory with a subdirectory of their username. So, for me, it would be /home/bassmadrigal/ (you can change that to be whatever directory you want, but that's the default and almost everyone sticks with it unless they have a strong reason not to, or it's a user account for a system user, which may not even have a home directory).

If you want to see all the user accounts and their home directories, you can view it in /etc/passwd. This is kinda like a text-based database. The various entries are separated by a colon. The first entry is the username, the second is a placeholder for the password, but that's no longer stored in this file. The third is the user ID or UID (in Slackware, the regular user IDs start at 1000, with the remaining being reserved for system users). The fourth is the group ID or GID. Most regular users will be assigned to the users group which has a GID of 100. The fifth section is typically the comment field, but can sometimes be used to store the user's full name, if added. The sixth field is finally the one that will show the user's home directory. The seventh and final field will show the user's default shell, typically /bin/bash.

So, now for an example of my main user's entry in my computer's passwd file.

Code:
jbhansen:x:1000:100:Jeremy Brent Hansen,,,:/home/jbhansen:/bin/bash
So, my username is jbhansen, my UID is 1000, and my GID is 100. My full name is listed in there (the commas are extra separators of the comment field added by the adduser command -- they can be ignored here). My home directory (~jbhansen) is /home/jbhansen, and I use /bin/bash as my shell.

You can use man 5 passwd to view the manpage on the /etc/passwd file.



No, hopefully the above cleared this up a bit. root is the only example of a user (that you'll use -- there's actually a lot system users that you'll never log in with) who does not have a home directory under the /home/ folder. root's home folder, by default, is under /root/.



No worries about this. We all had to start somewhere. I was lucky in that I started with Linux in a college class back in like 2001, where we were only allowed to be at the console the whole class (I think it was 2-3 months). If anyone was caught starting X (the GUI that allows you to use the mouse), it would have a large effect on your grade. The class was great because it taught me to be comfortable in the CLI (command line interface, basically the console where you type your commands). I hope that we cleared some confusion up, but feel free to continue asking questions and/or clarifying if certain examples are accurate.

EDIT: Sorry for the ton of text. I didn't realize how much it was until I posted it. Hopefully I didn't dump too much on you.

my mind works in a radial, net type of thing. a question comes in, i go out like a net. it is exhausting. when I get clarity, it becomes one line to that knowledge

to be retrieved, every time. what i am saying is, when I get clarity on a question, my CPU usage goes from 86% to 2 or 3%, so NO, you didn't dump too much on me. i am

calmer right now than at any point this day! so "Thanks"~!

i was able, from what you taught me to:
1.) login as my user = darledge in root
result: darledge@david :/$ this clarified the other way as you presented. now I know that this probably would not be done unless you were doing Desktop
Support in a Corporation but, was powerful in that it started to create in me that "I" am not root. root is root!
2.) and from earlier, on my own, I learned that:
File System = Root and that
Home = root
therfore: the Root/root thing that got me in Trouble in the 1st place or that root or Home is a part of the greater File System

which leads-out from a little of the knowledge on the 1st wiki you sent in the graph (graphs are very helpful to me) that helped lead to the 2.) discovery above.


"RAMDISK" - ASU Rams, tech professor, 1981 or so, he wrote this language, my interaction with it existed on 5 1/4" floppies and I presume a mainframe somewhere nearby.

I was damn good at it but, had it in my mind to be a businessman and didn't pursue it. I also had a Computer class in Spring 1977 at Trinity. At that point my head

was not in the game and withdrew from the class. There was a dude that "lived" in that Computer lab. Don't remember what language they used. Or Programming. But,

when I look back..."that was the dude" i knew that Succeeded in life!! Not the Jocks, not the Soches, not the Greasers....."that dude" is CTO somewhere laughing his

ass off on the way home from work in his brand-new Maserati.... ))
 
Old 12-10-2017, 07:37 PM   #38
bassmadrigal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wdarledge View Post
i was able, from what you taught me to:
1.) login as my user = darledge in root
result: darledge@david :/$ this clarified the other way as you presented. now I know that this probably would not be done unless you were doing Desktop
Support in a Corporation but, was powerful in that it started to create in me that "I" am not root. root is root!
As a regular user, you may go to the root /, but typically only to navigate somewhere else. They typically don't have permission to make any changes. But, Linux encourages the principle of least privilege, essentially stating you should only be root when you need to be and for as little as possible. Anything you run as root has full access to the system, so if there's bugs or other issues with the program, it could cause a lot of issues. If you happen to run the wrong command as root, you could break your system or accidentally delete something important. I don't say that to worry you, but to just encourage you to only use root when needed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wdarledge View Post
2.) and from earlier, on my own, I learned that:
File System = Root and that
Home = root
therfore: the Root/root thing that got me in Trouble in the 1st place or that root or Home is a part of the greater File System
Yes, this is one pain point I have of Linux. It can add to confusion when you're trying to specify one or the other. But, it looks like you at least understand it, so that's helpful
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-12-2017, 11:13 PM   #39
Richard Cranium
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Well, plants start at the root.

The filesystem starts at the root (/).

The user that exists at the start and can make more is known as root.

So, it doesn't have to be that confusing, if you squint your eyes and tilt your head just so.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-13-2017, 12:23 PM   #40
wdarledge
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by gauchao View Post
Please, moderate your language. I have the answer to your problem, but I don't feel quite interested in helping someone who speaks so rudely in a friendly forum. Anyway, this will do the trick:



Then you can go back to your nice MS-OS...

"Thank You" for your kind reminder to watch my language.

Please see my formal Apology in my Blog.

Yes, my language is taught. I apologize as I didn't mean it to offend. My friends find it offensive if I don't cuss ) Still, please
see my blog for further points.

And, thanks for the command as well. The Trash thing kinda got lost to me in all of the worry about being found guilty of offensive language
in here. It seems to work fine now, or at least as far as I can tell.

And, no thanks to the MSDOS thing, I know you meant it in only the kindest of ways, but Linux is much more fun~!

You cannot defeat hate with hate. You have to use love to defeat hate. Martin Luther King Jr.

David
10
out
 
Old 12-13-2017, 12:25 PM   #41
wdarledge
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
Well, plants start at the root.

The filesystem starts at the root (/).

The user that exists at the start and can make more is known as root.

So, it doesn't have to be that confusing, if you squint your eyes and tilt your head just so.

Right, absolutely right. I found that if I held my mouth just .... "so", that it all seemed to work out just fine.

Thanks for the Post. All of you are very kind to me, a Newbie, and with time, I shall return the favor to some Newbie in the future.

Always Pay It Forward or the point was lost to begin with~!

David
Noob
 
Old 12-13-2017, 12:35 PM   #42
wdarledge
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Question xwindows authentication for new user

Quote:
Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
As a regular user, you may go to the root /, but typically only to navigate somewhere else. They typically don't have permission to make any changes. But, Linux encourages the principle of least privilege, essentially stating you should only be root when you need to be and for as little as possible. Anything you run as root has full access to the system, so if there's bugs or other issues with the program, it could cause a lot of issues. If you happen to run the wrong command as root, you could break your system or accidentally delete something important. I don't say that to worry you, but to just encourage you to only use root when needed.



Yes, this is one pain point I have of Linux. It can add to confusion when you're trying to specify one or the other. But, it looks like you at least understand it, so that's helpful

"bassmadrigal"

I am Sorry to come to you directly about this. Please tell me if I should go back out, in the future, to the Forum to find answers. But,

a Google Search turned up #adduser and #passwd and I set up a new user darledge and it authenticates just swell~. But,

when I try to run the xWindows program #startx i get the following:

# xauth: time out in locking authority file //.serverauth.1140
and
# xauth: time out in locking authority file //.xauthority

then I have to ^z to escape out or just go make coffee and it seems to exit out all by itself eventually.

i seem to have bumped up against xwindows internal authentication HAL by accident.

is there something I have missed here? i mean, in adding a user. i don't remember having this trouble in 2004/5 with the Novell distro I was using
at the time.

and...thanks for all the time you have spent on me. some say, I am a lost cause. I find, that kind of sentiment just makes me TRY HARDER~! )
david
 
Old 12-13-2017, 01:43 PM   #43
wdarledge
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Angry on what authority do you make this statement?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
wdarledge, + all other Americans:
ASS = donkey
The word you want is ARSE.
Pisses me off when people misuse my language.
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/ass?s=t

please see definition #3....

now, do you have more authority than dictionary.com or are YOU just being an ARSE?
david
 
Old 12-13-2017, 01:46 PM   #44
wdarledge
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Angry on what authority do you make this statement?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
wdarledge, + all other Americans:
ASS = donkey
The word you want is ARSE.
Pisses me off when people misuse my language.
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/ass?s=t

please see definition #3....

now, do you have more authority than dictionary.com or are YOU just being an ARSE?
david

also, please see
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/arse?s=t
 
Old 12-13-2017, 02:07 PM   #45
bassmadrigal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wdarledge View Post
a Google Search turned up #adduser and #passwd and I set up a new user darledge and it authenticates just swell~. But,

when I try to run the xWindows program #startx i get the following:

# xauth: time out in locking authority file //.serverauth.1140
and
# xauth: time out in locking authority file //.xauthority
Depending on the instructions you followed for adduser, you may have not added your user to the proper groups, although, that seems less suspect here and more like a permissions issue.

However, to verify, can you post the output of the groups command? There should be like 5-10 groups assigned.

But your timeouts in locking a file could be related to a few different things. To narrow those down, can you provide the output of ls -la ~darledge to see if there's any permission issues in the base of your home directory.
 
  


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