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Old 12-07-2017, 06:32 AM   #16
michaelk
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wdarledge,
per the rules
Quote:
Do not post any messages that are obscene, vulgar, sexually-orientated, hateful, threatening, hostile or insulting.
Personal attacks on others will not be tolerated.
Flame Wars will not be tolerated.
Do not post if you do not have anything constructive to say in the post.
You can be direct and unflinching while using civil language.

And this is also directed to everyone else that has posted in this thread.

Last edited by michaelk; 12-07-2017 at 12:08 PM.
 
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Old 12-07-2017, 05:41 PM   #17
wdarledge
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
Thank you for not reading what I wrote and running some similar command in who knows what directory.

However, none of your partitions appear to be full so it doesn't matter that much.

What does (please run this command as I wrote it)
Code:
ls -al ~/.local/share | grep Trash
show? It might be that you can't write into your trash folder.

EDIT: Ah, @RadicalDreamer asked something similar and you no longer have a trash folder. Maybe you should create one and try again. Try running
Code:
mkdir -p ~/.local/share/Trash
followed by
Code:
chmod u=rwx,g=,o= ~/.local/share/Trash
and see if that helps. If it doesn't, you might have to create a couple of subdirectories in there (~/.local/share/Trash/files and ~/.local/share/Trash/info) which should be accessible only by you (same permissions as the Trash directory).

I apologize for the error in judgement about your direction to run a command 'df -h' in my "Home directory".

Maybe I just don't get "Home" directory as a 'fixed place' but, that it rather is logical and so "has no place"!

I guess, the whole Root/root thing has all of you upset. So, if this is Holy, then let it be Holy...nobody in here thinks more highly

of Linus than I do. If this goes back to him then, Who am I to question it? I really don't know.

But, that means I still do NOT know what the "Home directory is then. Is it /usr/local? Is it the "Home" for the iso's in question? What would make a

Directory "HOME" to me? That it boots-up into it? Or that it, by default, is where the programs in question "Trash" resides? Just because my

downloads folder is in "Home" or root, does it make THAT directory home? Why? There's nothing there but crap I want, not the stuff that makes

this whole thing TICK!

if Home is "/root" with a little "r" then so be it. But, this is a guess on my part and therefore by definition has NO AUTHORITY for validity!

So when you guys type out commands and say "run it in your Home directory" then I think to myself "where's that?


Now, to the first command, here is the one result of that command (as you typed it, in the 'default' Terminal directory of "bash-4.3# or /root:

bash-4.3# ls -al ~/.local/share | grep Trash
drwx------ 4 root root 4096 Dec 7 16:08 Trash
bash-4.3#
 
Old 12-07-2017, 06:03 PM   #18
TracyTiger
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Run the following two commands one at a time.
Code:
cd
pwd
It will display the home directory for the user you are currently logged in as.
 
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Old 12-07-2017, 06:14 PM   #19
wdarledge
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelk View Post
wdarledge,
per the rules


You can be direct and unflinching while using civil language.

And this is also directed to everyone else that has posted in this thread.

"michaelk"

Yes sir! I will be obedient to this directive as my Source of Authority on the subject of Flame Wars from now on.


It is hard to know who to obey in here as a "Newbie". There are those you have had here for decades who "think they own the joint" and those are the

unofficial leaders, apparently like Darth Vader. These "unofficial leaders" mean squat to me~! Other than "formal" leaders we are all equals

in here and everywhere else we choose to go in our daily lives. If someone, for instance, on the streets of Dallas, stops me and says "get down on

your knees and put your hands behind your back", then I look first to see if it is an Officer of the Law. If the answer to that question is NO...

then it is ON! This is called survival!


You must understand, that for me to be obedient, there has to be a "fixed authority structure". Darth Vader is NOT a "fixed authority" figure in here

as far as I can tell (and likely nowhere else either) and I find it repugnant for someone NOT in Authority over me to try and exercise Authority

over me that has NOT been given to them~! Especially when what is being called into question is not the words I used -none of them vulgar, none of

them "uncivil". Angry, yes, but to no one in particular, nor directed towards any group/sub-group in particular. Instead, directed towards a problem

in particular that had me beat! A type of "Shout at the Devil" type of thing.


If, however, "VENTING" is NOT ALLOWED on linuxquestions.org, then you should reply to this comment with that affirmation. Because, at this point, I

need to know if "VENTING" is something that I should NOT do on here in the future.


With that said, I will walk away from this fight, and from every other one that is presented to me ON YOUR AUTHORITY from this point forward to

time existent~!

David A.
 
Old 12-07-2017, 06:23 PM   #20
wdarledge
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by TracyTiger View Post
Run the following two commands one at a time.
Code:
cd
pwd
It will display the home directory for the user you are currently logged in as.
yes but if I am in /urs/local or in /root or in one of the lib folders, these commands will tell me where I am at but, none of that makes me

understand which of those paths, directories, structures is my "Home directory".

I do, however, get lost easily in Terminal, so the 'pwd' command is "invaluable" and the 'cd' command is beautiful all the way back to Win98~! )

It's just with that one, if in ls or dir i get 6 directories including /share as in the first example, and that I am supposed to run a command

looking for remenants of "TRASH" in there, it gets difficult when, in trying to get to that sub-folder, Bash will not let me. It "shows it in

ls or dir" but, when I type #/cd /share i get "invalid file or directory" >|<
 
Old 12-07-2017, 06:38 PM   #21
wdarledge
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by RadicalDreamer View Post
Have you:
Code:
rm -r ./local/share/Trash
?
ok, radical, i'll bite:


"Where is ./local ??????????


with all sincerity I don't know where this is. ./ is supposed to be the "current working directory" right? but, if you put local on the end

of that then, I am lost at that point~! I'm sorry, this is alphabetical and rudimentary to y'all but, not to me and I get so lost trying to find

authority on these type of issues because even in a Google search, the answers on this subject are baffling...then there's always the "dude, what

distro are you using" question that follows . it took me a long time to figure "that one out" because there is NO AUTHORITY on this one either~~!


Just some of my guesses:

./local = ./ = current local working directory (for the program "TRASH" in particular, or what folder the ISO for "TRASH" resides)

distro = short for "distribution" or RedHat, Slackware, Ubuntu, Sun...does Novell still issue a Gnome based "distro"(side-note_)


please correct me if I am wrong!!
david
 
Old 12-07-2017, 06:41 PM   #22
TracyTiger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wdarledge View Post
yes but if I am in /urs/local or in /root or in one of the lib folders, these commands will tell me where I am at but, none of that makes me understand which of those paths, directories, structures is my "Home directory".
Repeating Richard Cranium's response in a previous post. You didn't actually type the commands but assumed you knew what the result would be. Linux/Unix is not MS DOS.

I believe you are mixing up the current working directory with the home directory. They are not the same.

The cd commands (without arguments) changes the current working directory to the user's home directory. Each user account has its own home directory.

Quote:
ls or dir" but, when I type #/cd /share i get "invalid file or directory" >|<
You may benefit from a basic tutorial on Linux. Perhaps someone else has a link pointing to a good basic tutorial. With a better understanding of some of the basics you would be less frustrated.

Last edited by TracyTiger; 12-07-2017 at 06:43 PM.
 
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Old 12-07-2017, 06:47 PM   #23
michaelk
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It should be
Code:
~/.local/share/Trash
The dot/period indicates a hidden directory.
 
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Old 12-07-2017, 06:53 PM   #24
Darth Vader
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@wdarledge

Me, unofficial leader here? Last I checked, instead I was some kind of black sheep...

BTW, I strongly recommend you to learn first how the Slackware filesystem is structured and works.

Looks like you have no idea, then you risk to put down your own installation.

@all Where we have some detailed docs about this theme?

Last edited by Darth Vader; 12-07-2017 at 06:55 PM.
 
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Old 12-07-2017, 07:08 PM   #25
bassmadrigal
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To go a bit further on TracyTiger's post. Each user will typically have their home directory in /home/ under their username. So, for you, it would be /home/wdarledge/ and for me it would be /home/bassmadrigal/. The major exception to that rule (that you'd use) is the root account. Root's home directory is /root/.

When you are logged in as any user, if you type cd and press enter, The shell will return you to your home directory.

The home directory has a shortcut, and that's the tilde (~). If you type the tilde by itself, it is the same as typing /home/wdarledge/. So, you can access the home directory 3 different ways: cd, cd ~, and cd /home/wdarledge/ So, if you needed to access the trash folder that they've been mentioning, you can access it from anywhere in the system by using ~/.local/share/Trash/ or /home/wdarledge/.local/share/Trash/

If you want to access another user's home directory (let's say mine), you can use the tilde with the username right after it... like ~bassmadrigal/.local/share/Trash/, however, this is usually only beneficial as root, since permissions would prevent wdarledge from accessing bassmadrigal's home directory.

Two other things to be aware of is the . and .. "folders". A single period indicates the current directory and the double period is the parent directory. That is why you will sometimes see people to use ./random-command to run "random-command" (being whatever command you want to run).

Hopefully this helped a bit and didn't make things more confusing. Feel free to ask any other questions if you need more clarification.
 
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Old 12-07-2017, 09:26 PM   #26
Richard Cranium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
If you want to access another user's home directory (let's say mine), you can use the tilde with the username right after it... like ~bassmadrigal/.local/share/Trash/, however, this is usually only beneficial as root, since permissions would prevent wdarledge from accessing bassmadrigal's home directory.
As an additional warning, if you create directories and files as the root user, those directories and files will be owned by root. Such files are normally not modifiable by other users and can cause odd behavior. The root user can change the ownership of those directories and files via the chown command.
 
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Old 12-07-2017, 09:32 PM   #27
Richard Cranium
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_filesystem contains some information that you might find useful about how the file system is put together.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filesy...archy_Standard is what most Linux systems follow.
 
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Old 12-07-2017, 09:40 PM   #28
Richard Cranium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wdarledge View Post
I apologize for the error in judgement about your direction to run a command 'df -h' in my "Home directory".
I apologize for that snark.

After thinking about it, there's no guarantee that your user's ~/.local directory isn't mounted on its own partition or logical volume. The global df -h shows everything and since no partitions were full, that couldn't be the problem.

Since you don't know any of us from Adam, there's no reason for you to blindly execute whatever commands that we tell you to do. (Although high reputation folks should be pretty safe to listen to.) If you don't know what the command is doing, please ask and make us explain it.
 
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Old 12-08-2017, 07:19 AM   #29
brianL
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Here's a good book about using the commandline:

http://linuxcommand.org/tlcl.php

Download the pdf.

And have a look at the Slackware Documentation Project, link at the bottom of this post.

Last edited by brianL; 12-08-2017 at 07:20 AM.
 
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Old 12-10-2017, 11:04 AM   #30
lighter973
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post

instead I was some kind of black sheep...
You're not the black sheep, I am
 
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