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Old 10-02-2011, 01:02 PM   #1
jrhorn424
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Question Post-install Tips, User Permissions, and Auto-mounting External Drives


I have a number of questions for the community.
  1. Do you have any general tips for what to do after installing Slackware?
  2. I created an everyday user, but this user doesn't have access to sbin by default, so I have to go root or su to mount drives. Is this the recommended security settings, or should I add the new user to an admin group? If so, which group?
  3. In KDE, plugging in an external drive (usually) automatically mounts all the partitions, and they're usable via konqueror. However, in fluxbox, I've so far had to go su, manually create mountpoints and mount the devices. Is there a way to automate this? Also, is it OK to chown a mountpoint to the regular user so I don't have to stay root to do backups?
 
Old 10-02-2011, 01:13 PM   #2
ButterflyMelissa
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Hey there!

Quote:
Do you have any general tips for what to do after installing Slackware?
Enjoy the setup, use it on a daily base...

Quote:
I created an everyday user, but this user doesn't have access to sbin by default, so I have to go root or su to mount drives. Is this the recommended security settings, or should I add the new user to an admin group? If so, which group?
This is not only normal, but recommended/required behaviour. Dont change that. It is normal, and safe. That way, the user (you, in fact) cannot accidentally mess things up.

Quote:
In KDE, plugging in an external drive (usually) automatically mounts all the partitions, and they're usable via konqueror. However, in fluxbox, I've so far had to go su, manually create mountpoints and mount the devices. Is there a way to automate this? Also, is it OK to chown a mountpoint to the regular user so I don't have to stay root to do backups?
Dont know that much about Fluxbox, but should'nt you have dbus in the mix? I suspect this to be started int...rc.conf? In Arch it's this line in xininrc (in the user's home)

Quote:
exec ck-launch-session dbus-launch startfluxbox
Dunnow about Slack, though...

Luck!

Thor
 
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Old 10-02-2011, 03:30 PM   #3
jrhorn424
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Automounting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thor_2.0 View Post
Dont know that much about Fluxbox, but should'nt you have dbus in the mix? I suspect this to be started int...rc.conf? In Arch it's this line in xininrc (in the user's home)
Thanks for replying! I found a thread on Slackware and USB storage. I've started hald and messagebus, but I haven't yet downloaded vsupdfstab (I don't have a network card installed yet). That's an old suggestion, and I would hope that in 13.37, this functionality would have made it into the core.

I'll keep poking around.
 
Old 10-02-2011, 03:43 PM   #4
jrhorn424
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thor_2.0 View Post
This is not only normal, but recommended/required behaviour. Dont change that. It is normal, and safe. That way, the user (you, in fact) cannot accidentally mess things up.
Would it be advisable to add sbin to the user's PATH, so that something like sudo shutdown -h all would work without having to go su?
 
Old 10-02-2011, 04:02 PM   #5
Bindestreck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrhorn424 View Post
Would it be advisable to add sbin to the user's PATH, so that something like sudo shutdown -h all would work without having to go su?
You dont need to add whole /sbin to PATH because of using "shutdown" and/or other small software/scripts. You can set /sbin/shutdown to the sudoers-file so you can execute it without password.

You can then put it into the Fluxbox-menu and use the command:
[exec] (Shutdown) {sudo /sbin/shutdown -h now}

Last edited by Bindestreck; 10-02-2011 at 04:04 PM.
 
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Old 10-02-2011, 09:32 PM   #6
jrhorn424
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eXpander_ View Post
You dont need to add whole /sbin to PATH because of using "shutdown" and/or other small software/scripts. You can set /sbin/shutdown to the sudoers-file so you can execute it without password.
I've already added jrhorn424 to the sudoers file and to the wheel group, and I've enabled the wheel group in the sudoers file. Shouldn't that take care of it?

I'm not familiar with adding commands to the sudoer file.
 
Old 10-03-2011, 02:38 AM   #7
jrhorn424
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrhorn424 View Post
In KDE, plugging in an external drive (usually) automatically mounts all the partitions, and they're usable via konqueror. However, in fluxbox, I've so far had to go su, manually create mountpoints and mount the devices. Is there a way to automate this? Also, is it OK to chown a mountpoint to the regular user so I don't have to stay root to do backups?
Turns out, if I use the thunar file manager instead of konqueror in fluxbox, automounting works within fluxbox. I just had to pick a better file manager.
 
Old 10-03-2011, 05:03 AM   #8
Bindestreck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrhorn424 View Post
I've already added jrhorn424 to the sudoers file and to the wheel group, and I've enabled the wheel group in the sudoers file. Shouldn't that take care of it?

I'm not familiar with adding commands to the sudoer file.
If you enable wheel-group, then you can basically execute (correct me if I'm wrong) almost everything without a password ( if you enabled the wheelgroup with NOPASSWD). Im not sure if that is a good idea.

The best is to add the /sbin/<program-name> to the sudoers-file. Something like this:

##
## User privilege specification
##
root ALL=(ALL) ALL
expander ALL=(ALL) ALL
expander ALL= NOPASSWD: /sbin/shutdown
 
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:45 AM   #9
onebuck
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Hi,

Welcome to LQ!
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrhorn424 View Post
Thanks for replying! I found a thread on Slackware and USB storage. I've started hald and messagebus, but I haven't yet downloaded vsupdfstab (I don't have a network card installed yet). That's an old suggestion, and I would hope that in 13.37, this functionality would have made it into the core.

I'll keep poking around.
You should read 13.37 CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT.
No need to take steps backward.

Two good references SlackwareŽ Essentials & SlackwareŽ Basics.

Another useful resource would be 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!

You will find the following tutorial useful;
Quote:
excerpt from sticky 'So you want to be a Slacker! What do I do next?';

'New tutorials for installing and configuring Slack ' is a thread for a great tutorial: http://genek.net/LinuxAdventures/ins...allation1.html by 2handband. I recommend that all should look at this new tutorial for Slackware. Great for everyone!

http://genek.net/LinuxAdventures/sysadmin/index.html << new temp link

Newbies will learn a lot by following the sections within. As for the experienced users, it's a good place for us to recommend corrections or suggest areas that concern you. I for one participate with 2handband on subjects that I'm interested in: Slackware! Several other members have participated.
If you want to go multilib then Multilib Slackware for x86_64.

Few more Alien_Bob's links that you will find VERY useful;
This post may seem as a potpourri but just culls from the Sticky, Threads & 'Slackware-Links'.

Happy Slacking!
 
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Old 10-03-2011, 10:44 AM   #10
Woodsman
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Quote:
I've already added jrhorn424 to the sudoers file and to the wheel group, and I've enabled the wheel group in the sudoers file. Shouldn't that take care of it?
Not quite. The sudoers list allows that user to run commands and programs without a password. Adding names to the sudoers lists does not change the default search path for commands. For non root users the default search path for commands does not include /sbin and /usr/sbin.

I add my primary user to the wheel group and a few commands in the sudoers lists. For about a dozen "administrative" commands I create a sym link in /usr/local/bin to the /usr/sbin command. For example, I have sym links for lspci, lsusb, hdparm, ifconfig, route, runlevel. That way I don't have to meddle with the default search path or type the full path to use those commands.

For other commands that are in the /sbin or /usr/sbin directory, using su to obtain access to those commands is a tad inconvenient. Yet that is the intent with the 'nix multi-user security model.

Bear in mind when a user types the full path to an administrative commmand (/sbin, /usr/sbin), the user then excutes the command. The command itself might impose restrictions on usage, but the user still can run those commands when typing the full path.
 
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