LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 08-24-2006, 07:03 AM   #1
GEJOE DANIEL
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Posts: 81

Rep: Reputation: 15
Accessing my telnet system and editing /etc/fstab


1) I configured my system(Fedora-5) as telnet server.This was done by editing
the file ekrb5-telnet in xinetd.d as follows.I changed the last option of disable from yes to no..:

cat /etc/xinetd.d/ekrb5-telnet
# default: off
# description: The kerberized telnet server accepts only telnet sessions, \
# which use Kerberos 5 authentication and encryption.
service telnet
{
flags = REUSE
socket_type = stream
wait = no
user = root
server = /usr/kerberos/sbin/telnetd
server_args = -e
log_on_failure += USERID
disable = no
}

After this i configured my firewall to access my system thro' telnet .But whenever i tried to connect to my system from another system i got the following message:

Trying 192.168.32.5...
telnet: connect to address 192.168.32.5: Connection refused

But i was able to connect to my system using ssh from another system...
what's wrong??

2) What's the meaning of each entry in a single line found as follows in /etc/fsab:
/dev/sda1 /mnt/usbpen auto noauto,user,rw,exec 0 0

what does noauto and auto mean?what's rw exec 0 0???
Please help...
Thanks in advance..
Gejoe Daniel
 
Old 08-25-2006, 01:50 AM   #2
odcheck
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, RHEL, Debian
Posts: 978

Rep: Reputation: 31
1st other ports are used by telnet and ssh you will have to take a look at your Firewall config.
2nd the fstab... what does all this gibberish mean? As you see, every line (or row) contains the information of one device or partition. The first column contains the device name, the second one its mount point, third its filesystem type, fourth the mount options, fifth (a number) dump options, and sixth (another number) filesystem check options.
auto , this isn't a filesystem type :-) The option "auto" simply means that the filesystem type is detected automatically.
And with noauto, the device can be mounted only explicitly
rw Mount the filesystem read-write, also note the exec option. It's especially useful if you'd like to be able to execute something from the device.

regards
 
Old 08-25-2006, 02:02 AM   #3
IBall
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Distribution: Ubuntu, Debian, Various using VMWare
Posts: 2,088

Rep: Reputation: 62
Why do you want telnet?

Telnet is a legacy protocol, that is extremely insecure. All data is transmitted in plain text, including passwords. SSH can be viewed as a replacement for telnet, and is secure because all data is encrypted, so your data can not be intercepted by a 3rd party. SSH also has some other useful features, such as access to your files through SFTP and SCP.

Having said that, is the telnet daemon running? Try "ps aux | grep telnet" to make sure. Also, can you telnet to your own machine? Try "telnet localhost" to try.

--Ian

Last edited by IBall; 08-25-2006 at 10:53 PM.
 
Old 08-25-2006, 10:03 PM   #4
GEJOE DANIEL
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Posts: 81

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
thanks for the info about fstab file...
what about the telnet then..i understood about ssh and telnet now..i just wanted to test telnet as it's still available with the distro..just tht only...let me give additional information...
To find whether any process(daemon) is running for telnet :

[root@cool ~]# ps aux |grep telnet
root 2558 0.0 0.1 3912 680 pts/1 S+ 08:26 0:00 grep telnet
[root@cool ~]# ps -aux |grep telnet
Warning: bad syntax, perhaps a bogus '-'? See /usr/share/doc/procps-3.2.6/FAQ
root 2561 0.0 0.1 3916 716 pts/1 S+ 08:26 0:00 grep telnet


I tried to telnet my system itself using my ip address available:

[root@cool ~]# telnet 192.168.32.5
Trying 192.168.32.5...
telnet: connect to address 192.168.32.5: Connection refused
telnet: Unable to connect to remote host: Connection refused
 
Old 08-25-2006, 10:56 PM   #5
IBall
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Distribution: Ubuntu, Debian, Various using VMWare
Posts: 2,088

Rep: Reputation: 62
From this line:
Quote:
[root@cool ~]# ps aux |grep telnet
root 2558 0.0 0.1 3912 680 pts/1 S+ 08:26 0:00 grep telnet
The telnet daemon is not running, so you will not be able to connect. If you must use telnet, then install telnetd using your distro's package manager.

You will find that there is no difference between using telnet and SSH, accept that SSH is more secure.

--Ian
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
fstab editing similar Linux - Newbie 4 03-15-2006 05:52 AM
editing the fstab nkoplm Linux - Newbie 1 06-30-2005 02:21 AM
Editing fstab GingerMegs Linux - Software 1 06-04-2005 04:24 PM
Who is editing my fstab???!!! laszlo Linux - Newbie 5 06-30-2004 05:37 AM
Fstab editing Ando Linux - General 4 06-29-2003 05:17 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:16 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration