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Old 07-28-2009, 03:17 AM   #1
rohinee
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Can't find newly downloaded programmes


I recently picked up a BENQ netbook which runs on Linpus Linux Lite. I've never used Linux before, and, to be honest, I'm not having a good time. I installed Frostwire this morning, but I can't seem to locate it anywhere. It doesn't show up on the programme list and searching my hard drive for it resulted in nothing. Help!
 
Old 07-28-2009, 03:29 AM   #2
karamarisan
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I'm sorry to hear that things haven't gone perfectly smoothly for you so far, but honestly, I've been doing this for six years or so and they still don't. Try to understand that Linux isn't necessarily bad because it's different from what you're used to. If you're willing to put in the effort required to learn a new system, it can be extremely rewarding.

So, then - what exactly did you do to install it?
 
Old 07-28-2009, 03:46 AM   #3
jdkaye
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Hi Rohinee,
Open up a terminal and type
Code:
which frostwire
and that will tell you what folder it is in. (If that's what you want to know). Unless you used a very weird procedure, the installation should put the executable in your path (/bin, /usr/bin, /usr/local/bin, etc.) so just typing "frostwire" (no quotes) in a terminal window should get it to run.
cheers,
jdk
 
Old 07-28-2009, 10:21 AM   #4
widda
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JDKaye (hope I spelt it right, can't see it, and I could blow the session if I try to scroll right now.
I'm new at this and share the poster's (ditto for name) puzzlement, and I don't understand your answer, tho someday it'll be obvious.
Critical is this sequence
"in your[?] path (/bin, /usr/bin, /usr/local/bin, etc.)
Q1: How is it "my" path?
Q2: Does "/bin, /usr/bin" for instance mean the bin inside the usr inside the bin inside the root.
Hope you or someone passing by would throw a little light.
 
Old 07-28-2009, 10:55 AM   #5
onebuck
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by widda View Post
JDKaye (hope I spelt it right, can't see it, and I could blow the session if I try to scroll right now.
I'm new at this and share the poster's (ditto for name) puzzlement, and I don't understand your answer, tho someday it'll be obvious.
Critical is this sequence
"in your[?] path (/bin, /usr/bin, /usr/local/bin, etc.)
Q1: How is it "my" path?
Q2: Does "/bin, /usr/bin" for instance mean the bin inside the usr inside the bin inside the root.
Hope you or someone passing by would throw a little light.
Your path is the environment that you will be working with for your executable utility/programs that you can execute;

Quote:
excerpt from 'PATH';

PATH is an environment variable on Unix-like operating systems, DOS, OS/2, and Microsoft Windows, specifying a set of directories where executable programs are located. In general, each executing process or user session has its own PATH setting.
The 'bin' is a directory of files within '/bin' that contains binary utilities that are used to perform different actions. If you attempt to perform the 'ls' command from the cli your 'PATH' will point to the search areas that you are allowed to perform from. Hopefully the '/bin' is in your 'PATH' when you execute the command of choice. Otherwise you will get a error.

As for the 'Q2', it's as I stated above. The '/bin' is the 'bin' directory which contains the files '/bin'. This container can be on the same partition as '/' or another partition with the files that would be mounted to the '/bin'.

Just remember everything is treated as a file. In order to find the file of choice you must provide the means to directly access or default to your 'PATH'. If I want the 'ls' then I could input '/bin/ls' or 'ls' if my 'PATH' is pointing to '/bin'.

'Rute Tutorial & Exposition' is a book that covers GNU/LINUX system administration.

The above link and others available from 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 07-28-2009, 09:42 PM   #6
widda
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Thumbs up

Thanks Onebuck for that explanatory effort! It's pretty hard to get a grip on the terminology, so the longer the sentence, the more poorly-understood terms there are, so one thing is clear, my understanding of Linux filesystem is very low, despite attempts to absorb some texts.
There's a few 'folksy' versions which just interfere, for me. I need a hierarchical, tree-type diagram, and clear translations of the directories' purposes (contents). I think.
Anyway I'll gladly start with Slackware links and whatever others are in yr reply up there somewhere.
I am enjoying Mandriva Spring with Xfce desktop(weak old laptop) after only a short time (June) with Linux; no further interest in Windows.
 
Old 07-28-2009, 09:47 PM   #7
widda
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The answer to Q2 is fully baffling!
Maybe Q2 was also!
 
Old 07-28-2009, 11:25 PM   #8
mrrangerman
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widda

THis is taken from one of my books.
Quote:
$PATH contains the name of the search path (search string) that the shell uses when it searches for your commands.

The Search Path

When you enter a command, the first thing that the shell does is search for the program. But where does is look? Many Unix system installations contain thousands of directories and it would be too time-consuming to look everywhere. To focus the search, the UNIX system shell maintains a search path, which is also called search string. The search path is a list of directories where the shell looks for your commands.
Most search paths include the current directory, the /bin directory, and /usr/bin directory, where most of the standard software is located. (Directories containing executable files are conventionally named bin because executable programs are stored in binary files.) Large applications that consist of many executable programs usually are installed into their own bin directory.
Open up a shell window and take a look at your path.

Code:
echo $PATH
Also check roots path, you will notice roots path contains a /usr/local/sbin the sbin stands for system binary which are programs only used by the root user.

Quote:
Q2: Does "/bin, /usr/bin" for instance mean the bin inside the usr inside the bin inside the root.
Hope you or someone passing by would throw a little light.
You got it! / is the first directory or top of the inverted directory tree, so /bin is a directory just under root /. Or should I say one level down. To better understand this go to your home directory and type pwd this will show the current directory you are in. Mine looks like this /home/dan dan is inside of home which is inside of root/ so my home directory is two levels down on the inverted tree.
Hope this helps
 
Old 07-29-2009, 01:59 AM   #9
widda
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mrrangerman
thanks, that was totally understood, feels good to understand something in here!
My $PATH is /usr/bin:/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/X11R6/bin/:/usr/games:/usr/lib/qt4/bin:/home/e/bin

X11R6/bin came up as an exercise from the excellent LinuxCommand.org I just now came across (which has a good guided tour of files which I printed because I can't keep CLI and webpage onscreen together) - well,whenever I entered /usr/X11R6/bin it says no such file or directory.
So there's some point I'm missing.

Also, after your post I tried a few commands to find root's path, but no correct guesses to see that path.

"from one of my books": Which one?
 
Old 07-29-2009, 02:00 AM   #10
widda
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Thumbs up

mr ranger man
 
Old 07-29-2009, 02:48 AM   #11
jdkaye
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If you entered /usr/X11R6/bin on a command line then you would expect an error since it is a folder and not an executable file. Try entering something appropriate like
Code:
ls -l /usr/X11R6/bin
and you'll see some output.
cheers,
jdk
 
Old 07-29-2009, 08:17 AM   #12
mrrangerman
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Quote:
widda

Also, after your post I tried a few commands to find root's path, but no correct guesses to see that path.
To find roots path open a shell terminal su to root then use the echo command, if you are using one of the Ubuntu's you may need to prefix the command with sudo

sudo echo $PATH

To su to root, in a terminal window type,

su

then you will be prompt for the root passwd.


Quote:
"from one of my books": Which one?
I have several books on linux and unix that was taken from a old unix book Copyright 1994

title
"The UNIX operating system Third Edition"

Author: Kaare Christian and Susan Richter

HERE

I found it on ebay for a lot cheaper than what that one is listed for, I just gave the link so you could see what the book looks like.
 
Old 07-29-2009, 09:33 AM   #13
widda
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mrrangerman
Thanks for your time; It's helped a real lot just to get even one or two little things simple precise and unambiguous. And the quote from the book was also that way,I like the style, thanks for link. It's Mandriva'09 Spring I'm using.

jdkaye, that is probably what I did, no command.

Speaking of newly downloaded program, which roheeni? started this thread with, I may be back soon with a question of that kind.

Good forums, appreciate the help.
 
  


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