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Old 07-18-2010, 03:45 PM   #136
Dinithion
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Aha! Thank you so much. I actually got it. (after googling "subclause").
Since English isn't natural to me, it is difficult to distinguish the two. I did some online exercises, but I have to think real hard to know when to use what. So I'm not sure I dear use it, but hopefully. We'll see.
 
Old 07-18-2010, 03:48 PM   #137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
It's ok to never use whom, but you should know that when you listen to it, 'who' sounds out of place when used instead of 'whom'.
Well, actually, that's the deal with second languages. You can't always follow your intuition. Since I don't use it as an everyday language, I can't just talk and use whatever sounds right, because to me they both seem reasonable.

Last edited by Dinithion; 07-18-2010 at 03:55 PM.
 
Old 07-18-2010, 03:50 PM   #138
XavierP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jay73 View Post
Other example:
"My parents, whom I lived with the first 18 years of my life, ..."
What does "whom" refer to? To "My parents". So we replace whom with "my parents" and we get:
"I lived with my parents ..."
Here the subject of the sentence is not "my parents" but "I" so we use "whom".
Your example reminded me of a sketch from Not The Nine O'Clock News - Not The Parrot Sketch. This will tell you how to use "whom"
 
Old 07-19-2010, 04:12 AM   #139
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So with Linux, I am learning some English too. Nice one here for some who do not speak english natively though we do learn it at school level.
 
Old 07-21-2010, 06:17 PM   #140
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Hi

Is it forums or fora...?

AFAIK forum is latin so latin plural should be fora, but in English language does "forums" is a meanigless concept...?
 
Old 07-21-2010, 06:20 PM   #141
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some stuff in English language is weird... :

A computer cooling fan, refers to a device that is used to cool a computer, but it can also refer to a person that is adept of computer cooling... :

a fan of computer cooling = a computer cooling fan
 
Old 07-21-2010, 06:55 PM   #142
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Quote:
A computer cooling fan, refers to a device that is used to cool a computer, but it can also refer to a person that is adept of computer cooling... :
I know what you mean.

 
Old 07-22-2010, 06:37 AM   #143
XavierP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexvader View Post
Hi

Is it forums or fora...?

AFAIK forum is latin so latin plural should be fora, but in English language does "forums" is a meanigless concept...?
Both are correct. I guess that "fora" is absolutely correct if you want to be exact, but "forums" is in common usage and is accepted.
 
Old 07-22-2010, 03:11 PM   #144
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...and ppl say there are big differences between Aussie English and "Queen's English"... English is rather homogeneous IMHO...

...You should listen to guys from RyuKyu Islands ( Okinawa Honto ) speaking in Tokyo... I ts like some alien landing... LMAO
 
Old 07-22-2010, 03:38 PM   #145
frenchn00b
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shall we say:
Quote:
- in the beginning of 2010
or
Quote:
- at the beginning of 2010
?
 
Old 07-22-2010, 03:43 PM   #146
MrCode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexvader
You should listen to guys from RyuKyu Islands ( Okinawa Honto ) speaking in Tokyo... I ts like some alien landing... LMAO
Speaking Japanese, or English (or both)?
 
Old 07-22-2010, 04:25 PM   #147
Alexvader
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Speaking Japanese...

The Ryukyu Shoto, or Nansei, were not originally part of Japan...

They have several indigenous Languages, that are similar to what is spoken in mainland China, but different from island to island...

Yonaguni, Yaeyama, Naha Okinawan, Shuri Okinawan, Kunigami, Amami, Miyako....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryukyuan_languages

Those guys cannot undestand eachother... do you think they try to understand modern Japanese... ? ROFL
 
Old 07-22-2010, 05:06 PM   #148
XavierP
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It's "at the beginning of 2010, ...". We would say "in 2010, ..."
 
Old 07-23-2010, 04:36 AM   #149
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexvader View Post
...and ppl say there are big differences between Aussie English and "Queen's English"... English is rather homogeneous IMHO...
There are lots of different regional accents in England. For example, Oldham and Manchester are only about 6 miles apart, but the accents are totally different.
 
Old 07-23-2010, 08:20 AM   #150
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Quote:
There are lots of different regional accents in England.
I don't think he's talking about "accents". I think he's referring to the "properness" of a given dialect of English.

For example, in spelling: "color" (American English) vs. "colour" (British English).
 
  


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