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Old 05-13-2009, 05:07 AM   #106
colucix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
Is the right one, the other looks all wrong.
Thank you. Hence do I negate "to have" only when it is used as an auxiliary verb? E.g.
Quote:
I have not finished my book, yet
 
Old 05-13-2009, 05:35 AM   #107
brianL
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I don't really know all the technicalities of grammar (left school at 15 with no qualifications), all I know is what sounds/looks right.
Quote:
I have not finished my book, yet
That looks OK.
 
Old 05-13-2009, 05:49 AM   #108
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I have not finished my book, yet

That comma is not needed, it looks like you're going to continue the sentence or something.

Anyway, there's always more than one way to say something, and they are all acceptable as long as they make sense and sound ok.

In this case you could also say:

I have not yet finished my book. (a less good way, but still acceptable, grammar nazis may step in here)
I have yet to finish my book. (the best way, IMO)

Last edited by H_TeXMeX_H; 05-13-2009 at 05:51 AM.
 
Old 05-13-2009, 05:53 AM   #109
colucix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
I have yet to finish my book. (the best way, IMO)
Good to know. I have always used "yet" at the end of the sentence. Thank you.
 
Old 05-13-2009, 09:16 AM   #110
jay73
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It is a matter of emphasis. If you place "yet" at the end, you emphasize incompleteness; if you place "finished my book" at the end, you emphasize the thing that has not been completed yet.

Quote:
I have a very basic question: some minutes ago I posted a message in a forum and I wrote:
Quote:
version 2 does not have the =~ operator
is this an error? Maybe I should negate "to have"?
Quote:
version 2 has not the =~ operator
Thank you.
I believe that the second one should read "It has not any =~operator" to be perfectly grammatical. It would sound rather British, formal and possibly a bit archaic, though.And there is a third version:
It has not got any =~operator.
But syntax (the way words are strung together) is only part of the story. "Proper usage" is also largely a matter of pragmatics, that is, context (age, gender, class, geography, history, situation, ... ). What sounds right to the grandparent does not necessarily sound to the grandchild, what sounds right to Americans does not necessarily sound right to the British and even within those areas there can be disagreement. Or sometimes the same words take on different meanings in different contexts.
 
Old 05-13-2009, 10:02 AM   #111
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Another option: has no =~ operator

Robin
 
Old 05-13-2009, 10:53 AM   #112
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It all depends on the degree of formality you want in whatever you're writing or saying. As jay73 says, some of the examples look and sound more formal, or old-fashioned, than others. At one end of the spectrum, you've got "legalese", with its "heretofores" and such like abominations, at the other is a more conversational tone - writing as you would speak to your readers.
 
Old 06-06-2009, 10:23 AM   #113
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I'm building a website for a company who will be selling some products in the UK. The products are manufactured by another company (XYZ) abroad. As I've seen both versions on the internet, I'm slightly confused as to which one(s) is/are correct:
a) The official UK distributor of XYZ
b) The UK official distributor of XYZ
c) The UK's official distributor of XYZ

It will be on the home page of the website, next to the company's logo.

thanks

Last edited by sycamorex; 06-06-2009 at 10:24 AM.
 
Old 06-06-2009, 10:29 AM   #114
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Quote:
a) The official UK distributor of XYZ
Looks best to me.
 
Old 06-06-2009, 10:34 AM   #115
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Thanks.
 
Old 06-14-2009, 12:47 AM   #116
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Little english question, A or B or C is correct?
a) I have usually been doing the same thing
or
b) I have been usually doing the same thing
or
c) I usually have been doing the same thing

alternative, it is correct?
a') I have been doing the same thing usually
b') it is likely corrected into the right way.


Is there any information concerning the use of "The" in writing. Shall we try to avoid it as much as possible?
"The trees of Peru are always green during summer."
"Trees of Peru are always green during summer."
talking about general trees of Peru.
 
Old 06-14-2009, 12:53 AM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by colucix View Post
Good to know. I have always used "yet" at the end of the sentence. Thank you.
Quote:
I have yet to finish my book. (the best way, IMO)
With " to ", I guess the meaning is bit different.

The sentence
Quote:
I have not finished my book yet
is correct and sounds good. The "yet" is correct at the end. The comma was not necessary in your first example and should be removed. (I am not native, so never sure)

Last edited by frenchn00b; 06-14-2009 at 12:54 AM.
 
Old 06-14-2009, 05:40 AM   #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frenchn00b View Post
Little english question, A or B or C is correct?
a) I have usually been doing the same thing
or
b) I have been usually doing the same thing
or
c) I usually have been doing the same thing

alternative, it is correct?
a') I have been doing the same thing usually
b') it is likely corrected into the right way.


Is there any information concerning the use of "The" in writing. Shall we try to avoid it as much as possible?
"The trees of Peru are always green during summer."
"Trees of Peru are always green during summer."
talking about general trees of Peru.
none of the above, not sure what you're trying to say, but maybe:

I usually do the same thing.
I have been doing the same thing.
I tend to do the same thing.

Trees in Peru are always green during the summer.
The trees in Peru are always green during summer.

Try not to use too many "the"s per sentence. Only one of the nouns has "the" before it in most cases. Putting many "the"s will make the sentence hard to pronounce. "The" tends to add specificity to what you are talking about, if you're talking about a specific group of trees you would use "the trees", if just trees in general use "trees". So "the" makes nouns more specific in a way. Note: I'm no expert in grammar, these are just heuristics rules I've picked up myself.

Last edited by H_TeXMeX_H; 06-14-2009 at 06:11 AM.
 
Old 06-14-2009, 05:57 AM   #119
brianL
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I haven't seen all the trees in Peru, so I can't honestly say whether they are always green or not.
 
Old 06-14-2009, 03:02 PM   #120
frenchn00b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
none of the above, not sure what you're trying to say, but maybe:

I usually do the same thing.
I have been doing the same thing.
I tend to do the same thing.

Trees in Peru are always green during the summer.
The trees in Peru are always green during summer.

Try not to use too many "the"s per sentence. Only one of the nouns has "the" before it in most cases. Putting many "the"s will make the sentence hard to pronounce. "The" tends to add specificity to what you are talking about, if you're talking about a specific group of trees you would use "the trees", if just trees in general use "trees". So "the" makes nouns more specific in a way. Note: I'm no expert in grammar, these are just heuristics rules I've picked up myself.
thanks for the "The"!!

Regarding the USUALLY above, it is to know if we shall place it between
have/has and "been + verb-conjuguated"(?)

Example that is correct: the likely, ... -ly stuffs are usually between has/have and verb:
ex: The tress in this XYZ town have likely suffered from the hard winter.
(btw. shall I have 'the' before 'hard winter'?)

Greetings for the useful tricks/hints!
 
  


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