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  1. Old Comment

    They stole the parts off of my pinchiiiii lawnmower! Cabrones.

    Those were some crazy vatos!
    Who'd steal from a mug like that?
    Posted Yesterday at 12:50 PM by Habitual Habitual is offline
  2. Old Comment

    My Philosophy of a Gnu/Linux Slackware user.

    Personally, I am not here to help anyone do anything other than learn to help themselves.
    I am (silently) of the response vector that they "reap what they sow".
    "They don't know that they don't know." ... until ... "How do I ask a smart question?"
    and even that is an offense to many.

    The Information that most seek is 'out there'.
    I am not the progenitor of anything resembling "original".
    I am a keyboard commando and this is my-kungfu.
    Rule Number One: Fix more than you break.
    Rinse, Lather, and Repeat.

    It's a matter of numbers getting people up to speed
    on what it takes to install, maintain and repair a Linux System.

    I read it on the 'net. Same as everybody here this day.

    Have you hugged your SysAdmin today?
    Posted Yesterday at 09:42 AM by Habitual Habitual is offline
    Updated Yesterday at 09:46 AM by Habitual
  3. Old Comment

    My Philosophy of a Gnu/Linux Slackware user.

    I am starting to approach LQ threads with a similar philosophy.

    1. If not enough information : ignore or refer to the manual
    2. If vague question : ignore
    3. If asking to be spoon fed information (knowingly or unknowingly ): flame
    4. If questions provide background, detailed information and the OP is making an effort: references and hints - but never the outright answer.

    I don't like to spoon feed or breed laziness by promoting "ask and you shall receive." I think that if you want to be spoon fed and be lazy, you should be paying for support and advice regarding you operating system. My knowledge was formed over years of research, education, and trial/error. Nothing personal, I just think my time is more valuable spent doing something constructive, fun, or profitable.
    Posted 06-30-2015 at 01:56 AM by mralk3 mralk3 is offline
  4. Old Comment

    "Systemd sometimes doesn't shutdown" -- collecting links and info

    Eventually it ceased to occur, it seems. I wonder if everybody is still hating systemd as much or even more.
    Posted 06-25-2015 at 12:07 PM by the dsc the dsc is offline
  5. Old Comment

    My Philosophy of a Gnu/Linux Slackware user.

    I agree with you both.

    In ${DAYJOB} I routinely link the docs to users with a brief but concise summary of exactly what they need to know because, well, most of my customers are paying hard earned cash for support and as such have the right to demand I google a term for them (and that is a dramatized oversimplification, of course, as most of my customers are highly skilled IT Engineers and Developers). I used to assist on LQ because of my love of Linux and BSD, but I eventually grew weary of hand holding. There is zero justification for me to go out of my way to provide knowledge that I attained the hard way if the user isn't willing to meet me in the middle. Afterall, it isn't like every problem posted to the forum is immediately obvious and requires zero mental effort on my part.

    In short, I refuse to hand hold without pay. A well-written question that is clear and concise and shows that the user has done work to attempt to solve the problem I can justify expending effort to answer, however.
    Posted 06-24-2015 at 07:59 AM by rocket357 rocket357 is offline
    Updated 06-24-2015 at 08:01 AM by rocket357
  6. Old Comment

    My Philosophy of a Gnu/Linux Slackware user.

    Quote:
    Do we as Gnu/Linux Slackware users need to have a softer touch with interacting with members who fail to help themselves?
    No. What Slackware users need is a Slackware forum. That way they would not be constrained by LQ's commercial-friendly rules. At least, that is how I see things.
    Posted 06-24-2015 at 02:50 AM by Randicus Draco Albus Randicus Draco Albus is offline
  7. Old Comment

    Rough script that waits until processes finish their businesses, then exit

    I think that /dev/shm is quite handy and more appropriate for some temporary files, even more so for temporary files with no actual data, like in this case. It's both faster in itself (at least than hdd) and by reducing writes to the hdd it also will leave the hdd free to only work on writes that really matter. My old hdds are unbearably slow, so, even if I couldn't really measure the difference (and I never rally bothered to), I'd avoid writing things that don't really need to be written, just on principle.

    Or, almost that. There are a few people who actually have scripts that will copy the whole "./config/webbrowser/profile" folder to /dev/shm while it's in use, and update it back to the hdd with rsync when they close the browser. But I don't do that, mostly because I'm also somewhat short on RAM. I thikn arch linux even has this script packaged.



    But I speak as a more or less single-user (non root) desktop perspective, for server/real system administrators, the thing may really be very, very wrong, for some good reason I can't really imagine right now.
    Posted 06-23-2015 at 09:58 PM by the dsc the dsc is offline
  8. Old Comment

    Shifting Gears (again)

    Congratulations! Hope it all goes well.
    Posted 06-23-2015 at 03:22 PM by vmccord vmccord is offline
  9. Old Comment

    Second day of summer

    Been pretty wet in eastern KS too. Raining right now.
    Posted 06-23-2015 at 03:18 PM by vmccord vmccord is offline
  10. Old Comment

    Rough script that waits until processes finish their businesses, then exit

    Hi, your choice of work directory being /dev/shm... is strange. The only places I consider safe to write user data is /home/$USER or /tmp. /dev is, let's call it a reserved directory, don't put stuff there as a general rule.
    Posted 06-17-2015 at 12:32 AM by rhubarbdog rhubarbdog is offline
  11. Old Comment

    Bye proprietary.

    Is "weather" a binary or data file vs text file? The "-a" flag is to process such files as if they were text files. If it is already a text file you shouldn't need the "-a" flag.

    I wonder if you have grep aliased to "grep -a" on your Mint install and maybe that is why it works both ways there?
    Posted 06-16-2015 at 03:56 PM by MensaWater MensaWater is offline
    Updated 06-17-2015 at 03:20 PM by MensaWater
  12. Old Comment

    Reviving a teenage Mac with Debian

    Thanks - nice to hear another success story.
    Posted 06-05-2015 at 09:29 PM by wagscat123 wagscat123 is offline
    Updated 06-05-2015 at 09:30 PM by wagscat123
  13. Old Comment

    Reviving a teenage Mac with Debian

    I used to run Debian on a G4 iBook, and it ran nicely with a full XFCE desktop. It's a bit lighter and snappier than other distros, but I haven't tried Jessie on the ibook since it bit the dust not too long ago. Hope your experiences continue to be as good as mine were on this hardware.
    Posted 06-04-2015 at 10:34 PM by goumba goumba is offline
    Updated 06-04-2015 at 10:36 PM by goumba

  



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