LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-01-2004, 12:05 PM   #1
blackman890
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Iceland
Posts: 94

Rep: Reputation: 15
editing settings n proFTP(daemon)


can someone help me configuring proFTPd?
 
Old 11-01-2004, 02:13 PM   #2
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
the manpage can:
Code:
man proftpd
if you want help here, be more specific...
 
Old 11-01-2004, 03:23 PM   #3
blackman890
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Iceland
Posts: 94

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
well, what i wan't is to configure it, i found a good ite: http://www.proftpd.org/docs/faq/link...h5.html#AEN452 but the proplem is that i can't open '/etc/proftpd.conf'
all i get is (in X) 'you don't have permission to read this file' or was it 'open this file'

anyway, i am using Mandrake 10.0, that followed a magasine called Linux Format and proftpd followed with it, and using KDE 3.2
 
Old 11-01-2004, 03:28 PM   #4
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
Code:
ls -l /etc/proftpd.conf
-- mine is 644 for root:root, and i haven't touched it...

i'm sure we're all proud of you for using a non-root user for day-to-day tasks, but in this case you'll need more access rights. so logon to root from shell, and then you can edit that file...
 
Old 11-16-2004, 12:02 PM   #5
blackman890
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Iceland
Posts: 94

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
well, how do i change permission in console?
i wan't to be able to change permission on a file (or a folder)

a normal user be able to read and write into a file
and change the permission on a folder from 'view content' to 'modifie and view content'
 
Old 11-16-2004, 12:14 PM   #6
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
chmod for change permission
chown for change ownership

let's see here, basic ascii-based permissions tutorial...

you have 3 realms, if you will...
1) owner
2) group
3) world
each has 3 permission groups
1) read
2) write
3) execute

now, string those all together, and you would look at it like:
rwxrwxrwx
--owner rwx followed by group rwx followed by world rwx
got that?

now, all those permissions can be either on or off, in binary a 1 or a 0
so let's turn everything on, and you get
--owner 111 group 111 world 111, or 111111111
convert those to decimal, where 111 = 7, and you get permission leve 777

take away write access from someone, and it would be 101, convert to decimal = 5... say we leave owner/group with full permissions, and take away write access from everyone else, we would now have permission level 775...

follow?
 
Old 11-16-2004, 03:36 PM   #7
blackman890
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Iceland
Posts: 94

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
so if i wan't to change permision, then i do:

'chmod 111111111' or 'chmod 777'
if i wan't to take permission off, then i do:
'chmod 111111101' or 'chmod 775'
which will make the file be able to read and write for root and users, but not for the world, they can only read and execute, got that
so am i suposed to add the file name after like:
'chmod 774 directory_or_filename'
?

BlackMan890
 
Old 11-16-2004, 03:41 PM   #8
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
Quote:
chmod 774 directory_or_filename
yup, you use the decimal, that's why i breifly went through those conversions -- the quoted gets you permissions rwxrwxr--

you will about never use permissions 777

now, root will have access, no matter what... the first grouping is for the owner of the file... you can change that using
Code:
chown user:group file
 
Old 11-16-2004, 03:46 PM   #9
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
more: try using
Code:
man chmod
for more info... you can also use options like [ugoa]+x and [ugoa]-w, and limit those for each *group* if you prefer that over the decimal conversions method...

Quote:
with zero or more of the letters `ugoa';
these control which users' access to the file will be
changed: the user who owns it (u), other users in the
file's group (g), other users not in the file's group (o),
or all users (a)
 
Old 11-16-2004, 04:25 PM   #10
blackman890
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Iceland
Posts: 94

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
wow, thanks guys
lol, i got some MAJOR proplem, in the folder, i had added a couple of files that i could modifie and read and so on, but take a look

# chmod 774 name_of_a_folder
#

ok i go to the folder and check the permission,, and i can modifie the folder, i enter, AND every file is locked, all i get is:

file/bla/folder_name/a_file doesn't seem to exist anymore

and i go to console and do:

vi nameoffile

and it seems to work
when i check the permission, then i get suprised, i can change the permission (in X, not in console) but i am only a user, so i check if i can modifie permission on the folder i just chager, and i get the normal (can't modifie)

what happened?
 
Old 11-17-2004, 10:30 AM   #11
blackman890
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Iceland
Posts: 94

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
bump

-=*bump*=-
 
Old 11-17-2004, 03:29 PM   #12
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
sorry... kinda stopped reading after the thanx bit...

anyways...

ok, let's look at a scenerio, and you tell me if i'm understanding your problem:

you don't have access to a folder, so you chmod it, but you still don't have access to anyting in the folder... is this the case?

there is a 'recursive' option (-R) which you can use with both chmod and chown to recurse through directories into sub-directories, and hit every file along the way... but there is a danger to mention -- you must not start at too high a level, imagine what would happen if (as root) you ran
Code:
chmod 000 -R /
i bet that'd really bugger things.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Settings daemon problem Draiocht Slackware 2 09-14-2005 08:00 PM
Gnome-settings-daemon failed slackwarefan Slackware 3 03-09-2005 06:30 AM
Gnome Settings Daemon prob RedFox314 Slackware - Installation 2 02-17-2005 03:11 AM
gnome settings daemon b0uncer Linux - Software 1 10-05-2003 04:33 AM
Daemon Settings Failed At Startup!!!!!!!! kDwosk Linux - Newbie 2 08-22-2003 05:46 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:36 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration