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Old 08-27-2012, 04:19 PM   #16
SecretCode
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Since /tmp isn't full (according to df) and you have plenty of RAM, I suspect this is a misleading error message caused by something else. I would test other things to narrow down what causes the error message. Such as:

Code:
fallocate -l 10485760 /tmp/tmp # create a 10MB file in /tmp

wget http://www.linuxquestions.org/ -B /tmp # saved a small index.html file in /tmp
and then repeat with larger files.
 
Old 08-27-2012, 07:11 PM   #17
forbinproject
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@rknichols, the RAMTMP option isn't present in /etc/default/tmpfs. It is, however, present in /etc/default/rcS for some reason. The only reason I looked is because it was cross referenced in /etc/default/tmpfs. I went ahead and switched the yes to no, dropped to ctrl alt f1, sudo /etc/init.d/mdm stop, but I kept getting some sort of write cache error on a fixed time interval (maybe 5-10 seconds)? I was trying to lsof | grep /tmp (and also "/tmp", just in case), but no output of anything using /tmp. I eventually couldn't issue any command, so I used reisub. Everything rebooted fine, but I wasn't able to complete the full process you linked here from LM Forums, which haven't elicited much by the way. I've always found better help in this forum. I'm just not sure how best to proceed. I wasn't unable to umount /tmp, or check for processes using /tmp to my satisfaction.

Output of /etc/default/tmpfs.

Code:
# Size defaults for tmpfs filesystems mounted in early boot, before
# filesystems from /etc/fstab are mounted.
#
# NOTE: This file is deprecated.  Please see rcS(5) for details on how
# to configure tmpfs size limits.
#
# _SIZE variables are the maximum size (in bytes) that tmpfs
# filesystems can use.  The size will be rounded down to a multiple of
# the page size, 4096 bytes.  If no size is set, TMPFS_SIZE will be
# used as the default.
#
# Note that more complex mount options may be used by the creation of a
# suitable entry in /etc/fstab.  For example:
# 	tmpfs	/run	tmpfs	size=10%	0	0
# is equivalent to RUN_SIZE=10%, and will override the RUN_SIZE
# setting.  This will allow additional options such as nr_blocks and
# nr_inodes to be used, and also adjustment of the mode, nodev,
# nosuid, noexec options should any change from the defaults be
# necessary.

# TMPFS_SIZE: maximum size for all tmpfs filesystems if no specific
# size is provided.  If no value is provided here, the kernel default
# will be used.
TMPFS_SIZE=20%

# RUN_SIZE: maximum size of /run (was previously /var/run)
#
# Defaults to 10% core memory; the size required varies widely
# depending upon the demands of the software being run; this heuristic
# scales /run usage on system size.  Samba in particular has been seen
# to use at least 50MiB in a large heavily used server.  Typical usage
# is hundreds of KiB, maximum is tens of MiB.
RUN_SIZE=10%

# LOCK_SIZE: maximum size of /run/lock (was previously /var/lock)
#
# Typical usage: tens of KiB; maximum hundreds of KiB.  Default of
# 5MiB should ensure the limit is never reached.
LOCK_SIZE=5242880 # 5MiB

# SHM_SIZE: maximum size of /run/shm (was previously /dev/shm)
#
# No default size; the size required varies widely depending upon the
# demands of the software being run.
SHM_SIZE=

# TMP_SIZE: maximum size of /tmp
#
# No default size.
TMP_SIZE=
This is the output of /etc/default/rcS now:
Code:
#
# /etc/default/rcS
#
# Default settings for the scripts in /etc/rcS.d/
#
# For information about these variables see the rcS(5) manual page.
#
# This file belongs to the "initscripts" package.

# delete files in /tmp during boot older than x days.
# '0' means always, -1 or 'infinite' disables the feature
TMPTIME=0

# spawn sulogin during boot, continue normal boot if not used in 30 seconds
SULOGIN=no

# do not allow users to log in until the boot has completed
DELAYLOGIN=no

# assume that the BIOS clock is set to UTC time (recommended)
UTC=yes

# be more verbose during the boot process
VERBOSE=no

# automatically repair filesystems with inconsistencies during boot
FSCKFIX=no

# mount /run/lock as a tmpfs (separately from /run)
RAMLOCK=yes

# mount /run/shm as a tmpfs (separately from /run)
RAMSHM=yes

# mount /tmp as a tmpfs
RAMTMP=no
Should I attempt to switch RAMLOCK and RAMSHM to "no"? I'm sorry I whizzed through the cache write through error. If I can reproduced the error, I'll post the output if you like.
 
Old 08-27-2012, 07:13 PM   #18
forbinproject
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@SecretCode. True, but I do more than that for doing a series of scans of my students' essays. I'd really like to do this in Linux, at home, and not have to resort to scanning them at the work site using Windoze.
 
Old 08-27-2012, 07:19 PM   #19
forbinproject
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"which haven't elicited much by the way."

Linux Mint Forums, that is.
 
Old 08-28-2012, 06:37 AM   #20
SecretCode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forbinproject View Post
@SecretCode. True, but I do more than that for doing a series of scans of my students' essays. I'd really like to do this in Linux, at home, and not have to resort to scanning them at the work site using Windoze.
More than what? Of course downloading a 50KB is something I don't expect to fail. But I also don't expect your students' essays or other google docs to be 600MB! I still think the error message is caused by something other than not having enough space in /tmp.
 
Old 08-28-2012, 08:16 AM   #21
Inkit
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Quote:
This is the error message: There is not enough room on the disk to save /tmp/8kGEfg+M.doc.part. Remove unnecessary files from the disk and try again, or try saving in a different location.
Is there any particular reason why you want to store stuff in temp. it gets wiped clean every time you shut down, and is meant to be a temporary storage space. If you're downloading stuff, why not save it to your disc and then open it. You can always delete what you don't want later on.

Last edited by Inkit; 08-28-2012 at 08:29 AM.
 
  


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