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Old 01-27-2011, 03:18 PM   #1
citi
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sudoers list


where can i find this list, I've been using linux for about two years I'm an IT student and find it cool as NY is right now but I normally use ubuntu. today I got fed up of logging in as root every time I need to perform a minor admin task, so I decided to install "sudo", long story short when I tried to execute this usually simple command how shocked I was to be informed that not only don't I have permission to do so but I've been put on report(to whom i'm still Waiting to find out). I'm used to ubuntu, new to fedora,but I now understand the slogan "Linux For Human Beings"
 
Old 01-27-2011, 03:25 PM   #2
eSelix
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To edit sudoers run command "visudo". Check manual for sudoers ealier. Probably you need only add yourself to group admin as in sudoers file should be already
Code:
# Members of the admin group may gain root privileges
%admin ALL=(ALL) ALL
You shouldn't be shocked that normal user cannot use sudo command, it is for administrators only.
 
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Old 01-27-2011, 03:37 PM   #3
citi
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sudoers list?

use ubuntu new to fedora
used sudo all the time and never was put on report, and to whom am i being reported to? where is the "sudoer's list" located and who's idea was this? if i have the proper password, it's my computer, if its smart enough to put me on report then it should be smart enough to recognize a personal workstation from one that's connected to a administered network
 
Old 01-27-2011, 03:47 PM   #4
Disillusionist
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This should have been added to your existing post rather than double posting the same problem.

Attempts to use sudo by users that aren't in the sudoers file are reported to the root account. The system doesn't know that this is a personal machine so you can't really blame the OS for doing what it is programmed to do.

As eSelix states in your other post, you should log in as root and use the visudo command to edit the sudoers file.

Once you are in the sudoers file you won't be "reported" again.
 
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Old 01-27-2011, 03:47 PM   #5
TobiSGD
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The (mis)use of sudo in Ubuntu is a special case, it is only done so in Ubuntu (and derived distros), and not in others. So it is Ubuntu that is behaving abnormal. In most other distros you use su to become root.

You can use
Code:
su -c visudo
to set up sudo the way you want. Be aware that you have to type in the root password, not that of your user.
To get more info how to do that try
Code:
man sudoers
And by the way, computers aren't only as smart as they are set up. The computer doesn't care who is his owner, he only cares what is written in its config files. So set it up right, and he will be as smart as you wish .
 
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Old 01-27-2011, 04:24 PM   #6
onebuck
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Please post your thread in only one forum. Posting a single thread in the most relevant forum will make it easier for members to help you and will keep the discussion in one place. This thread has been merged with the original.
 
Old 01-27-2011, 08:01 PM   #7
citi
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Thumbs up stand corrected

Quote:
Originally Posted by Disillusionist View Post
This should have been added to your existing post rather than double posting the same problem.

Attempts to use sudo by users that aren't in the sudoers file are reported to the root account. The system doesn't know that this is a personal machine so you can't really blame the OS for doing what it is programmed to do.

As eSelix states in your other post, you should log in as root and use the visudo command to edit the sudoers file.

Once you are in the sudoers file you won't be "reported" again.
My apologies, I've never used any other distro besides Ubuntu so it was new to me, but you live you learn(at least some of us do), thank you. PS: I've never belonged to a forum of any sort so I'm learning that as well when i posted the fist one I wasn't sure if it went through. I still think if you can write code that will quote three rules and tell me I'm on report, add a line or two that tells it the difference between personal computer and an administered net-workstation. just in case you plan to ask, I'm just starting to "play" with python so I can't. At least not yet, soon though, very soon. Member of PyAtl, haven't been there in a while though, night classes and all. Thanks For the info though. citi
 
Old 01-27-2011, 08:33 PM   #8
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citi View Post
add a line or two that tells it the difference between personal computer and an administered net-workstation.
But how do you think the machine should recognize? My three main machines (workstation/laptop/server) are on a heterogeneous network with a variable number of other machines, but they are my personal machines (except the server, it works as a server for all machines on this net). How should any of these machines recognize that they are personal machines? And why do you think that personal machines need to have sudo configured? This may bring up a flamewar, but in my eyes the way Ubuntu uses sudo is simply a misuse of an otherwise good concept. And yes, I have sudo on my machines, but not to get general root access.

Last edited by TobiSGD; 01-27-2011 at 08:36 PM.
 
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Old 01-27-2011, 08:44 PM   #9
citi
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
The (mis)use of sudo in Ubuntu is a special case, it is only done so in Ubuntu (and derived distros), and not in others. So it is Ubuntu that is behaving abnormal. In most other distros you use su to become root.

You can use
Code:
su -c visudo
to set up sudo the way you want. Be aware that you have to type in the root password, not that of your user.
To get more info how to do that try
Code:
man sudoers
And by the way, computers aren't only as smart as they are set up. The computer doesn't care who is his owner, he only cares what is written in its config files. So set it up right, and he will be as smart as you wish .
i never save any thing important to the home folder, most i have to worry about is my downloads and i always back those up. good advice but i'm not that type of novice. i rarely make mistakes of that kind
 
Old 01-27-2011, 08:56 PM   #10
citi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citi View Post
i never save any thing important to the home folder, most i have to worry about is my downloads and i always back those up. good advice but i'm not that type of novice. i rarely make mistakes of that kind
sorry this was ment for the "do yourself a favor and back up" comment. and i don't mean to offend any of you. i'm just getting to know you all.
 
Old 01-27-2011, 09:09 PM   #11
citi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
But how do you think the machine should recognize? My three main machines (workstation/laptop/server) are on a heterogeneous network with a variable number of other machines, but they are my personal machines (except the server, it works as a server for all machines on this net). How should any of these machines recognize that they are personal machines? And why do you think that personal machines need to have sudo configured? This may bring up a flamewar, but in my eyes the way Ubuntu uses sudo is simply a misuse of an otherwise good concept. And yes, I have sudo on my machines, but not to get general root access.
I feel the same way as you do, which is why I installed it in the first place. I use it to do quick installs, un-installs, and updates. If I'm doing something I'm not supposed to, why warn me; so I can get my story straight by the time admin gets to me. to quote G.I. Joe " Knowing is half the battle".
in a grand scale, i'm new to IT and may be brainwashed by the "Windows" world don't you have to specify whether your logging on to the network or the workstation, or is that just a microsoft thing. if so that would be one way. if not.......well as I said I'm learning.

Last edited by citi; 01-27-2011 at 09:44 PM.
 
Old 01-27-2011, 09:19 PM   #12
TobiSGD
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First of all, the backup statement is part of my signature and was not meant directly for you, but for anyone who reads it. Just because there are many people which do not backup and the cry about lost data if anything goes wrong.

Quote:
I use it to do quick installs, un-installs, and updates.
These are administrative tasks. I use a root shell for that, not sudo. I only use sudo for mounting ISO-files and rebooting/shutting down the system. Not less, not more. Any other administrative task is made via su or an explicitly started root terminal, started with gksu.
 
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Old 01-27-2011, 09:22 PM   #13
citi
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Please post your thread in only one forum. Posting a single thread in the most relevant forum will make it easier for members to help you and will keep the discussion in one place. This thread has been merged with the original.
I like that line, will use it when applicable, Gary.
 
Old 01-27-2011, 09:52 PM   #14
citi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
First of all, the backup statement is part of my signature and was not meant directly for you, but for anyone who reads it. Just because there are many people which do not backup and the cry about lost data if anything goes wrong.

These are administrative tasks. I use a root shell for that, not sudo. I only use sudo for mounting ISO-files and rebooting/shutting down the system. Not less, not more. Any other administrative task is made via su or an explicitly started root terminal, started with gksu.
didn't Know tobi, I'm new to this forum, and blogging as a whole. all in time, all in time. thank you
 
Old 01-27-2011, 09:57 PM   #15
citi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
First of all, the backup statement is part of my signature and was not meant directly for you, but for anyone who reads it. Just because there are many people which do not backup and the cry about lost data if anything goes wrong.

These are administrative tasks. I use a root shell for that, not sudo. I only use sudo for mounting ISO-files and rebooting/shutting down the system. Not less, not more. Any other administrative task is made via su or an explicitly started root terminal, started with gksu.
I'm still a student. I haven't administered anything other than my workstation and the ones where I reside and all except mine run windows.
 
  


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