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Old 06-20-2015, 11:27 AM   #1216
maples
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheIndependentAquarius View Post
So can I say - have you been to the Paras hospital?
Paras is the name of the hospital.

Or should I say - have you been to Paras hospital?
If "Paras Hospital" is the name of the hospital, then you should leave out "the".

If you're referring to a hospital in a city named "Paras" then you would say "the Paras hospital".

Hope this helps!
 
Old 06-26-2015, 01:57 PM   #1217
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Ok, I have a question that I've been afraid to ask on Stack.

One of the first capitalization rules Americans learn within American English is that 'I' as the first person pronoun is always capitalized.

For example, "That girl said that *I* was a witch."

My understanding is that 'I' as first person pronoun is always capitalized in British English also.

I see 'I' not capitalized often enough in other versions of English that I wonder if the capitalization is not standard outside British and American English.
"She said that i was a witch."

Can anyone who knows other English dialects/traditions tell me if this is so?
 
Old 06-26-2015, 02:15 PM   #1218
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I'm not a native speaker of English, but I doubt it's correct to write the first person pronoun not capitalised in any English variant. I've often seen it written in lower case, but it's generally in places like Facebook, Internet fora, etc., where many people don't pay attention to the rules.
 
Old 06-26-2015, 02:33 PM   #1219
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odiseo77 View Post
I'm not a native speaker of English, but I doubt it's correct to write the first person pronoun not capitalised in any English variant. I've often seen it written in lower case, but it's generally in places like Facebook, Internet fora, etc., where many people don't pay attention to the rules.
This is correct. "I" a first person pronoun to be correctly used is always capitalized. However people get lazy, as odiseo is saying when they post on facebook, especially with their smart phones. I've noticed that tablets and smart phones do not auto-capitalize just "I", and then amazingly they'll change the number six by replacing the "i" with an "e", and invariably do that in a professional email to your boss! One of the reasons I hate using my tablet to write anything significant...
 
Old 06-29-2015, 12:15 PM   #1220
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
This is correct. I've noticed that tablets and smart phones do not auto-capitalize just "I", ...
That's why I thought it must not be a rule, my iPhone (personal) and my Android (work) always auto-correct 'i' to 'I'.
 
Old 02-09-2017, 01:09 PM   #1221
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The first two questions are easy

1. [can go] [she]
gives the solution "she can go."

2. [she] [to the park] [can go]
gives the solution "she can go to the park.".

3. However the following is more difficult:
[can go] [she] [with me] [to the park]

"She can go to the park with me."
or
"She can go with me to the park."

which one is the (most) correct one?
 
Old 02-10-2017, 03:21 AM   #1222
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Quote:
"She can go to the park with me."
or
"She can go with me to the park."

which one is the (most) correct one?
The second one is more correct, but there is nothing terribly bad about the first one.

More is used with two options not most.
 
Old 02-10-2017, 11:38 AM   #1223
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachboy2 View Post
The second one is more correct, but there is nothing terribly bad about the first one.

More is used with two options not most.

Thank you !!

"She can go with me to the park." It has maybe the less important at the end... maybe.

Are there maybe any grammatical rules to know which one would be better?
 
Old 02-10-2017, 11:47 AM   #1224
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Quote:
It has maybe the less important at the end... maybe.
That's right.

She and me are joined together since the two them (combined) are doing the going and their destination is the park.
 
Old 02-10-2017, 12:53 PM   #1225
DavidMcCann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeratul View Post
"She can go to the park with me."
or
"She can go with me to the park."

which one is the (most) correct one?
Both are equally correct in terms of word order, although "come" is more idiomatic that "go".
"She can come with me."
"She can go with John."

The difference between "come" and "go" is subtle and depends on the overall view of the situation. So
"All right, I'm going" said to some-one who's asked you to go somewhere.
"I'm coming" called out to some-one who's called you.
"Come with me" but "Go with John" because they're both said by me and so view the motion from my point of view.

The word order depends on the circumstances. As pointed out, the more important information comes first. In fact "park" in the first case and "me" in the second would be stressed in speech.

Last edited by DavidMcCann; 02-10-2017 at 12:58 PM.
 
Old 02-12-2017, 04:52 AM   #1226
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Here are two examples illustrating the correct use of more and most.

Which is the most unpleasant treatment at the dentist?

1. a checkup
2. a filling
3. an extraction
4. root canal work.

Which is the more unpleasant treatment at the dentist?

(a) a checkup
(b) an extraction
 
Old 04-04-2019, 11:14 AM   #1227
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A question to native speakers of English:

When someone says, for instance, "up there" it can mean "around there" depending on the context, right? (As a vague/undetermined/informal way of speaking). For instance, if you're in the Southern area of the USA and you're referring to a city in the Northern area of the USA, you can say "up in New York"/"up there in New York". Am I correct?

Last edited by jazzy_mood; 04-04-2019 at 11:42 AM.
 
Old 04-04-2019, 12:52 PM   #1228
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They both sound fine to me. "Up in New York" is probably best, with "up there" used when the conversation has already established the location.

The use of "up" is interesting. Geographically, it can mean
1. Northwards: "up in Edinburgh" for someone in England.
2. To a more prestigious place:
to a capital ciry: "up to London", even for someone living to the north.
to university: "going up to university" or "up to Cambridge".
"up West" in East London usage, meaning to the central entertainment and shopping district.
3. And then there's "up the Thames", as in "up-stream".
 
Old 04-04-2019, 01:26 PM   #1229
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
They both sound fine to me. "Up in New York" is probably best, with "up there" used when the conversation has already established the location.

The use of "up" is interesting. Geographically, it can mean
1. Northwards: "up in Edinburgh" for someone in England.
2. To a more prestigious place:
to a capital ciry: "up to London", even for someone living to the north.
to university: "going up to university" or "up to Cambridge".
"up West" in East London usage, meaning to the central entertainment and shopping district.
3. And then there's "up the Thames", as in "up-stream".
Thanks for the clarification; that was pretty much my guessing too .
 
Old 04-13-2019, 02:46 PM   #1230
Trihexagonal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzy_mood View Post
A question to native speakers of English:

When someone says, for instance, "up there" it can mean "around there" depending on the context, right? (As a vague/undetermined/informal way of speaking). For instance, if you're in the Southern area of the USA and you're referring to a city in the Northern area of the USA, you can say "up in New York"/"up there in New York". Am I correct?
"Up there in New York" would be redundant IMO.

I live in the Midwest and would say "in New York", if I was referring to the North Pole I would say "at the North Pole". While I might say "up there in that tree" because that's the way we talk around here, would not say "up in New York", "up there in New York" or "up there at the North Pole" even informally.


I don't normally speak like this when talking to people and while it's a way's from the way they talk on the Beverly Hillbillies not too far off.
 
  


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