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Old 06-29-2004, 04:52 PM   #1
diam0nd
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Some questions after a successful OpenBSD 3.5 installation


Hi, I've made my own OpenBSD 3.5 CD from the instructions that were listed in official and unofficial FAQs and guides, and now my OpenBSD is up-n'-running (and networking is ok too.)
now, what I want is to have a normal Window System, which will run the latest OpenBSD-ported KDE, plus the necessary packages, which in linux are installed automatically (Editors, Internet tools, Media tools, and all the other standard Utilities which comes with (I guess) every normal Linux distro (I know that not all of these kinds of packages are ported to OpenBSD, and I don't really need all of them, and I'm sure that I'll be just fine with what they can offer now.)
So how can I do all of that? this OpenBSD box was generally meant to be a desktop (yes, a desktop, not any kind of server/firewall/router) and for that I need all of these things.
TIA.
 
Old 06-29-2004, 06:44 PM   #2
chort
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Did you install the X sets during the installation? You need those to run X (obviously). You'll need at least xbase and xserv, although you'll probably want them all.

You should go read the OpenBSD FAQ because it covers how to get and install various software components (either by ports and compile yourself, or by binary packages from the FTP sites). KDE and all those other apps are in the ports/packages tree. You just need to install them. There are no "groups" of applications like in some Linux distros. You only install what you want/need so there's much less bloat.

As for the "desktop" vs. server bit, yes there are quite a few people who use OpenBSD as a "desktop" (I would call it a "workstation" since it's not just sitting there to look pretty). Really ask yourself what you're criteria is for selecting an operating system. Do you want something that is very simple to use, very secure, and very well coded? If yes, then use OpenBSD. If you want something that has lots of flashy multi-media aps and sexy 3D rendered graphics, than OpenBSD is not for you. Yes, OpenBSD has mplayer, xmms, etc but the focus of OpenBSD is not to make it run great with multi-media, the focus is to make it ultra-secure. If you don't give a crap about security, you're not going to appreciate that.

Last edited by chort; 06-29-2004 at 06:49 PM.
 
Old 07-01-2004, 05:58 AM   #3
newpenguin
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dont waste your time in making unix look like windows, simply use windows.
BSd's are not made to use on desktop's.
 
Old 07-01-2004, 11:10 AM   #4
the_gorf
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Oh I strongly disagree!! While most of my desktops at home and work are Linux, my media player/browser machine in my shop has run both OpenBSD and FreeBSD with X on it. It does quite well.

But I will admit that it isn't as convenient to deploy.
 
Old 07-01-2004, 12:31 PM   #5
diam0nd
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Well, I guess I didn't explained myself well. first, one-by-one:

chort: first, yes, I did installed all the X sets. second - I know what i'm standing in front of, I know that the main purpose in OpenBSD is security (and oh yeah for sure I appreciate that), and "sexy 3D rendered graphics" are really not my thing, and for SURE I don't want my OpenBSD to be like windows
so, why the heck do I want to use OpenBSD? so, first thing I want to get used to it, for future purposes, I wanna learn how to use and maintain this OS, again for future and maybe present purposes too... the thing is that I want two things in my OS: that it will be secure, and that I will be able to use it for daily purposes like coding, chattin', surfin', and so on... (oh and gaming / 3D stuff / multimedia is not really my thing...)
well, here ends the explanation part. now for the practical part. Now, I did read the FAQ, but unfortunately I didn't really got the idea of how I can get KDE up-n-running. and for the thing that there are no "groups" - if so, I guess I can't just pick the KDE package and do some installation, right? isn't there a dependency thing? (I don't just try that because I don't wanna screw the things up)
so that's it...
TIA.
 
Old 07-02-2004, 11:19 AM   #6
chort
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Read the section on ports and packages again. You can either download and install the pre-compiled KDE package, or you an compile it yourself from the ports tree. If you do follow the instructions for checking out the ports tree, you'll find it in /usr/ports/x11. When you build from source, depdendencies are automatically handled. If you install the package, it will let you know what the dependencies are and you have to install those first if they don't already exist.

Last edited by chort; 07-02-2004 at 11:21 AM.
 
Old 07-04-2004, 05:38 AM   #7
diam0nd
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Well I chose to install KDE from the ports tree, so I downloaded ports.tar.gz for OpenBSD 3.5 from ftp.openbsd.org, extracted, and typed 'make' in /usr/ports/x11/kde .
Now, It started compiling and downloading all the necessary things, and after a couple of hours I got an error that I have no more space. So, I did 'df -h', and saw that all my allocated space to /usr, which is 2.7G, is full. so, I reinstalled, but now with 4.0G for /usr, and again it filled up all the 4.0G... how can this be? in my slackware 9.1 box I have 2.1G used in /usr, and I have there not only KDE but all the other applications too. and I don't think I can allocate more than 4.0G for /usr... maybe I can find some way, but I can't know if that would help... what is the problem here? and what can I do?

Last edited by diam0nd; 07-04-2004 at 06:22 AM.
 
  


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