LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 09-06-2007, 09:20 AM   #1
AtomicAmish
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: East coast, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 139

Rep: Reputation: 15
Permission denied after running xwmconfig


To change window managers from openbox to KDE, as a regular user I ran xwmconfig. The message I get when xwmconfig closes is:

Code:
rm: cannot remove '/home/username/.xinitrc-backup': Permission denied
mv: cannot move '/home/username/.xinitrc/' to '/home/username/.xinitrc-backup': Permission denied
After this, startx just hangs. How can I get X working again?
 
Old 09-06-2007, 09:44 AM   #2
Karimo
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Valencia
Distribution: slackware64-current
Posts: 63

Rep: Reputation: 15
A very simple thing: have you checked permission of /home/username/.xinitrc-backup? have you?
 
Old 09-06-2007, 10:02 AM   #3
AtomicAmish
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: East coast, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 139

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
I have not. Though I have a couple of minor install issues, this is my first hitch in regular operation. New Slackware user here, though I'm not new to Linux.

So. I will chmod .xinitrc-backup and .xinitrc to read and write permission for my user and see if that takes care of it.

Thanks for the reply, Karimo.

Last edited by AtomicAmish; 09-06-2007 at 10:04 AM.
 
Old 09-06-2007, 10:49 AM   #4
AtomicAmish
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: East coast, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 139

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
As root in my user's directory, I just did:
Code:
chmod ./.xinitrc -rwx------
and the permissions do not change. Again: As root, and the permissions didn't change. Of course xwmconfig still gives the same error.

Screenshot:
http://i15.tinypic.com/2epiwxw.jpg

I made the permissions restrictive for safety reasons, but even if they need to be broader the user can do whatever is needed.

What is going on here?
 
Old 09-06-2007, 11:37 AM   #5
uselpa
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Luxemburg
Distribution: Slackware, OS X
Posts: 1,507

Rep: Reputation: 46
man chmod

Please...
 
Old 09-06-2007, 12:32 PM   #6
AtomicAmish
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: East coast, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 139

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks for the response, uselpa.
 
Old 09-06-2007, 08:01 PM   #7
AtomicAmish
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: East coast, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 139

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Permissions for both .xinitrc and .xinitrc-backup have been changed to 0755 and there is no improvement. The same error messages are given at exit from xwmconfig, and startx times out and doesn't start X.
 
Old 09-07-2007, 04:16 AM   #8
tramni1980
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Tübingen, Germany
Distribution: Slackware64-13.37
Posts: 737

Rep: Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtomicAmish View Post
Permissions for both .xinitrc and .xinitrc-backup have been changed to 0755 and there is no improvement. The same error messages are given at exit from xwmconfig, and startx times out and doesn't start X.
as root run:
chown username /home/username
chmod 0700 /home/username
 
Old 09-07-2007, 08:17 AM   #9
AtomicAmish
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: East coast, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 139

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thank you, tramni1980. I need to work on my chmod skills.
 
Old 09-07-2007, 02:55 PM   #10
Karimo
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Valencia
Distribution: slackware64-current
Posts: 63

Rep: Reputation: 15
the files under your home directory must be owned NOT by root, but by your user account, so: chown and chmod when such things will happen again =)
 
Old 09-07-2007, 06:10 PM   #11
AtomicAmish
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: East coast, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 139

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karimo View Post
the files under your home directory must be owned NOT by root, but by your user account, so: chown and chmod when such things will happen again =)
That makes sense, of course, but the two affected files were owned by the user. So I don't see why they were giving permissions problems.

Anyway, thanks for the reply.
 
Old 09-08-2007, 03:38 AM   #12
tramni1980
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Tübingen, Germany
Distribution: Slackware64-13.37
Posts: 737

Rep: Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtomicAmish View Post
That makes sense, of course, but the two affected files were owned by the user. So I don't see why they were giving permissions problems.

Anyway, thanks for the reply.
Sometimes permissions of directories are changed by scripts you run and do not understand well. Also when you copy files to a directory as root some permissions change. The issue is not quite clear to me too.
 
Old 09-08-2007, 04:33 AM   #13
Karimo
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Valencia
Distribution: slackware64-current
Posts: 63

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtomicAmish View Post
That makes sense, of course, but the two affected files were owned by the user. So I don't see why they were giving permissions problems.

Anyway, thanks for the reply.
Is not sufficient, sometimes, that the file is owned by the user.
For instance: a file owned by the user with permissions 400 can't be written or executed by the user.
Your .xinitrc files must have had permissions like 400 because, although owned by the user, the user itself couldn't write to that file (infact 400 means: r-- --- --- [Only reading permission only for the user]).
A little clearer now?
 
Old 09-08-2007, 04:39 AM   #14
tramni1980
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Tübingen, Germany
Distribution: Slackware64-13.37
Posts: 737

Rep: Reputation: 37
Besides, to be able to delete a file from a directory, you must have a write permission to that directory. To be able to cd to a directory, or to modify a file in a directory you have to have the executable perission, etc.
 
Old 02-14-2008, 09:43 AM   #15
AtomicAmish
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: East coast, USA
Distribution: Slackware 12.0
Posts: 139

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Karimo, tramni1980 - a very belated thank you for your replies. I hadn't noticed them when they were posted.

Everything is running smoothly for months now and I'm chown-ing and chmod-ing as needed.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
can't execute c++ binaries, "permission denied"... even though permission is 777 SerfurJ Programming 14 02-20-2009 05:50 AM
'permission denied" inspite of right permission flags on network drive anirudhvij Linux - Enterprise 8 05-22-2007 06:57 AM
Permission Denied when running a program? tolvar Linux - Newbie 1 09-07-2005 09:18 AM
Permission denied on client when running install script residing on NFS server dstotz Linux - Newbie 2 12-11-2004 03:10 PM
Eclipse SDK v3.0 running problem: "Permission denied" AlexDunnCpp Linux - Newbie 1 08-03-2004 12:45 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:23 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration