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Old 05-07-2008, 03:37 AM   #1
shadowsnipes
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HowTo: Upgrade Slackware 12.0 to 12.1


This HowTo will show you an example of how to upgrade Slackware 12.0 to 12.1.

Note: This HowTo is just a guide and does not cover all possible scenarios. Rather it attempts to expand on the great information carefully compiled in the UPGRADE.TXT and CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT through a practical example. Again, this HowTo is just a guide and may not be correct for your situation. Use your brain and adjust accordingly. If you have any questions, concerns, comments, or complaints please voice them through posting. This is a forum after all

Updates:
All of the most recent changes are in RED.

2008-07-03
  • Note about Liberation Fonts overriding MS TTFs
  • Link to Beautiful Fonts thread

2008-05-18
  • Split HowTo into two parts
  • Expanded Updates section
  • More kernel package information, patching sources for non-SMP, UTF8 console
  • Added more to Miscellaneous Fixes section - mostly because I saw a few threads crop up recently about some of the issues I had not discussed (though were still in the CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT).
  • Discussed Remote Control changes in Audacious

2008-05-08
  • Latest Slackpkg recommendations added
  • Notes about rc.modules symlink, files under etc/modprobe.d

The sections of this HowTo are:
Part 1
Should You Upgrade?
Things You Need to Upgrade
Backup Computer
Getting 12.1 Sources
Create List of Non-Slackware Software
Begin Upgrade
Mass Upgrade
Alternative Mass Upgrade with slackpkg
Kernel Packages

Part 2 - Skip to post #19
LILO and the Fancy Bootsplash
Get Rid of Obsolete Slackware Packages from 12.0
Merge Changes for Config Files
Update Your Graphics Drivers (if needed)
Miscellaneous Fixes
Rebuild/Upgrade any Non-Slackware Packages (as Needed)
Fix Other Random Problems


** Should You Upgrade? **
This should be the first thing you ask yourself. What's in it for you? If you aren't sure, you should read the following docs:
ANNOUNCE.12_1
RELEASE_NOTES
CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT

How much work will it take? Well that depends on your system. If your system is in a state of disaster with software installed who knows where then it might be a better idea to backup and install a fresh Slackware 12.1 instead.


** Things You Need to Upgrade **
1) Slackware 12.1 sources – however you can get them: On a CD/DVD, local mirror, from a slackware mirror, network mount, etc
2) Slackware 12.0 installation – This is a HowTo on upgrading from 12.0 after all...

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT
Note that upgrading from a Slackware version earlier than 12.0 is NOT supported at all and will almost certainly lead to breakage.
So, for instance, you can't directly upgrade (safely) from Slackware 9.0 to 12.1. You would probably need to upgrade incrementally to each version. After you're done you need to post a member success story

3) Time – This is not a one click upgrade process. It will require that you think. Take your time and do it right the first time. Please read the UPGRADE.TXT and CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT before attempting an upgrade! This HowTo does not cover everything included in those files.
4) (Newest Graphics Driver) – It might be a good idea, for instance, to grab the latest Nvidia driver now if you are going to need it later.


** Backup Computer **
This is without a doubt the first thing you should do before making any major system changes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UPGRADE.TXT
Before you begin, I would strongly recommend making a backup of your
system, or, if not the entire system, at least the /etc directory. You
might find that you need to refer to a few things after the upgrade
process is complete. Back it up, or take your chances.

** Getting 12.1 Sources **
Most people will probably download the full iso, but if you have downloaded some sources from -current previously it might be more worth your while to simply mirror. In my case I had previously used Alien Bob's mirror-slackware-current.sh to create a local mirror of -current and install cds. I had used these to test -current. Before using mirror-slackware-current.sh I recommend you create mirror-slackware-current.conf based upon the options that you want changed from the defaults (see beginning of mirror-slackware-current.sh).

An example mirror-slackware-current.conf
Code:
BUILDER="shadowsnipes <email@youremail.com>"
SLACKROOTDIR="/mnt/path/to/Slackware_Mirror"
ISO="NONE"
EXCLUDEFILE="/home/USERNAME/scripts/mirror-slackware/mirror-slackware-excludes"
My mirror-slackware-excludes contains
Code:
pasture/ 
source/ 
slackware/kdei/
Also, if you run the script with -h you can see the runtime arguments available.

After -current became Slackware 12.1 all I had to do was
change my mirror folder names from slackware-current to slackware-12.1 and slackware-current-iso to slackware-12.1-iso.

Then run
Code:
mirror-slackware-current.sh -r 12.1
which mirrors the 12.1 release instead of -current. There were almost no changes between my latest copy of -current and 12.1.

Another tip for using this script: If you have to mirror onto a non-linux partition take out the 'p' from the actual rsync commands in the script so that they don't try to preserve permissions. In my case I only had enough free space on an external NTFS drive, so that is what I used. There are two places I had to change the script, since the sync is done twice. I simply changed a line that looks like
Code:
$RSYNC --delete --delete-excluded -z -rlptD \
to
Code:
$RSYNC --delete --delete-excluded -z -rltD \
Also, for this to work correctly on a non-linux partition you must make sure the user running the script is the owner (mount using the uid option).


** Create List of Non-Slackware Software **
Before you move on into the upgrade you need to properly assess where you are, and in particular, what non-slackware software you have installed.

By far the easiest way to do this is to use slackpkg, which you can find in /extra (for alternate scripts see this thread about Listing Non Stock Slackware Packages). It is recommended that you download the latest stable slackpkg release in order to have all the features used in this HowTo (such as batch and default_answer support). Do note, that the latest release is likely to be a later version than the one in the latest stable Slackware release, so you should add slackpkg to your blacklist to prevent accidentally downgrading it. You should also check the ChangeLog periodically to see if there are any crucial fixes.

Once you install it, be sure to edit blacklist, mirrors, and slackpkg.conf under /etc/slackpkg as desired (set the mirror to one for 12.0 for now). Then to get your list you can simply do
Code:
slackpkg update
slackpkg -dialog=off -batch=on -default_answer=no clean-system > NonSlackwarePackages.txt
NonSlackwarePackages.txt now contains a list of packages that aren't a part of the Slackware tree.

Now is a good time to get rid of any of those non-slackware packages that you no longer need. There is a chance that you will have to rebuild some of your custom packages after the upgrade.

I suggest organizing this list. You might want to, for instance, group some packages together that should be rebuilt or updated. You might also want to add any notes about software installed that is not packaged. It would be a good idea to refer to CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT again at this point.


** Begin Upgrade **
As root, go into runlevel 1.
Code:
telinit 1
Mount mirror or install medium.
If the files are on a cd then you will have to mount the other cd(s) in order to install the other packages. In my example, I was using a local mirror on my external hard drive (second partition).
Code:
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda2 /mnt/externalNTFS
cd into the mirror's directory
Code:
cd /mnt/externalNTFS/Slackware_mirror/Slackware-12.1/
upgrade glibc-solibs
Quote:
Originally Posted by UPGRADE.TXT
Upgrade your glibc shared libraries. This is important, or things might go haywire during the first part of the upgrade:
Code:
upgradepkg slackware/a/glibc-solibs-*.tgz
upgrade package utilities
Code:
upgradepkg slackware/a/pkgtools-*.tgz
** Mass Upgrade **
The most basic way to upgrade/install all of the packages is to follow UPGRADE.TXT.
Quote:
Originally Posted by UPGRADE.TXT
3. Upgrade everything else (and install new packages):

upgradepkg --install-new /root/slackware/*/*.tgz

If you wish to upgrade everything except for the KDEI language
packs for KDE (these take a lot of space and can be dealt with
after the main upgrade more quickly and easily), running this
script in the "slackware" directory will do the trick:

#!/bin/sh
for dir in a ap d e f k kde l n t tcl x xap y ; do
( cd $dir ; upgradepkg --install-new *.tgz )
done
Keep in mind that if you are using cds your packages will be split among them, so you will have to use more than one instance of upgradepkg. By the same token, the for loop snippet given above should be altered to reflect which packages sections are actually on the cd.

If you need any non-en_US language packs for KDE please refer to UPGRADE.TXT.

Also, if you don't want to upgrade/install certain packages (ie. blacklist them), then you will have to write a slightly more complicated script, install those package sections manually, or use something like slackpkg to help you.


** Alternative Mass Upgrade with slackpkg **
The trick to using slackpkg to do this is to specify a mount point as the mirror in /etc/slackpkg/mirrors. Since it is just a mount point, it does not matter what kind of device the partition is on as long as you can read it. In my case I had a local mirror on a NTFS partition on an external hard drive. I simply added the following to /etc/slackpkg/mirrors

Code:
cdrom://mnt/externalNTFS/Slackware_mirror/Slackware-12.1/
Of course, you could also specify a regular, non-local, mirror and use slackpkg in the usual way.

Blacklisting packages
It is also important to make sure /etc/slackpkg/blacklist has all the packages listed you don't want to be messed with. For instance, I do special things with my firefox packages so I list mozilla-firefox in the blacklist. Some people like to blacklist the kernel packages.

A keen observer might note that by default a/aaa_elflibs is already blacklisted, while the instructions in UPGRADE.TXT clearly have you installing them. In general, yes, aaa_elflibs should be blacklisted because it will overwrite your core libraries. During a full system upgrade, however, you can upgrade them, but you don't have to. The more important thing to realize is that this package is really only there to make sure you have the core libraries you need in case you do not do a full install of Slackware. As such, if you do a full install/upgrade of Slackware it is likely that you won't need that package anyways. If you aren't sure, simply check if all the files included are already installed (my pkg-sanity script or these other useful scripts may be of some help). In this upgrade, I found no libraries where missing from not installing it. If you do choose install it, for whatever reason, just make sure it is one of the first packages installed (which is probably why it has 'aaa' in the front). Another post on aaa_elflibs

Once your slackpkg configuration is all set, update with the new mirror
Code:
slackpkg update
and install the new packages
Code:
slackpkg install-new
Review the list and deselect any you are not ready to install at this point.

Note: By default, slackpkg will prompt you to handle new config files after installing/upgrading packages. If you need help on this skip down to the "Merge Changes for Config Files" section momentarily.

Upgrade all the packages
Code:
slackpkg upgrade-all
Again, review the list and deselect any you are not ready to install at this point. You might want to look at the kernel section of this HowTo before you upgrade them.

Since I was using fuse and ntfs-3g (both created via slackBuilds from slackBuilds.org) for my external NTFS partition, I decided not to upgrade those packages just to be safe. After all the other packages were installed I copied the packages to my hard drive, unmounted the external drive, stopped fuse (/etc/rc.d/rc.fuse stop), and then upgraded the fuse and ntfs-3g packages using upgradepkg. After that I started fuse and remounted the drive.

If you need any non-en_US language packs for KDE please refer to UPGRADE.TXT.


** Kernel Packages **
Keep in mind that the kernel image packages change the symlinks in /boot for System.map, config, and vmlinuz. This is important to note because a lot of people refer to vmlinuz in their boot manager's configuration. Which ever kernel image package is installed last (usually huge-smp) will have the symlinks pointing to its respective files. So, after upgrading your kernel packages you might have to fix these symlinks and modify your bootloader's configuration (/etc/lilo.conf for LILO) accordingly.

Also, if you ever modified your past kernel sources or built custom kernels, you should take a look in the following places to see if any clean up is necessary:
/usr/src
/lib/modules
/etc/rc.d/rc.modules*
In my case, I had a kernel sources folder and a module folder for a custom 2.6.21.5 kernel I had built that I needed to remove (I no longer intended to use them). I also had a rc.modules file for it that needed to be removed and the rc.modules symlink had to be fixed.

Please note that it is not recommended that you run the huge kernel for daily use (though it may not cause problems). Also, if you have one of those machines that don't work well with a SMP kernel you will need to patch your kernel sources.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT
As stated earlier, it is recommended that you use one of the generic kernels
rather than the huge kernels
; the huge kernels are primarily intended as
"installer" and "emergency" kernels in case you forget to make an initrd.
For most systems, you should use the generic SMP kernel if it will run,
even if your system is not SMP-capable. Some newer hardware needs the
local APIC enabled in the SMP kernel, and theoretically there should not be
a performance penalty with using the SMP-capable kernel on a uniprocessor

machine, as the SMP kernel tests for this and makes necessary adjustments.
Furthermore, the kernel sources shipped with Slackware are configured for
SMP usage, so you won't have to modify those to build external modules
(such as NVidia or ATI proprietary drivers) if you use the SMP kernel.

If you decide to use one of the non-SMP kernels, you will need to follow the
instructions in /extra/linux-2.6.24.5-nosmp-sdk/README.TXT to modify your
kernel sources for non-SMP usage.
Note that this only applies if you are
using the Slackware-provided non-SMP kernel - if you build a custom kernel,
the symlinks at /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/{build,source} will point to the
correct kernel source so long as you don't (re)move it.

If you decide to use one of the huge kernels anyway, you will encounter
errors like this:
kobject_add failed for uhci_hcd with -EEXIST, don't try to register
These occur because the respective drivers are compiled statically into the
huge kernels but udev tries to load them anyway. These errors should be safe
to ignore, but if you really don't want them to appear, you can blacklist the
modules that try to load in /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist. However, make sure you
remove them from the blacklist if you ever decide to use the (recommended)
generic kernels.
Also, if you need an initrd (you do if running the generic kernel) you will need to set that up. Please see /boot/README.initrd for instructions on this if needed.

Stock Kernels use UTF8 conole now
If you find you have problems with the console after this upgrade you might need to add the following append line for each of your kernel images listed in your /etc/lilo.conf. Personally, I had no such problems, so this was not needed for me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT
The new 2.6.24.x kernels default to use a UTF8 console. This might break some
things, so if you prefer the "old" default, you'll need to add this to your
kernel's lilo stanza: append = "vt.default_utf8=0"
Finally. since your kernels changed you will need to run lilo (assuming you are not using another bootloader). Before you do that, make sure your /etc/lilo.conf is still pointing to the correct images, and you can also choose to add a bootsplash to your Lilo prompt. This is covered in the next section.


This HowTo is continued at Post #19

Last edited by shadowsnipes; 07-03-2008 at 12:00 PM.
 
Old 05-07-2008, 09:04 AM   #2
rworkman
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Excellent post, shadowsnipes; I *really* like that you made many references to the existing documentation instead of trying to rewrite it.

Moderators, please sticky this, as it will surely be useful to people.

There are a couple of points I'd like to make:
1. No idea how I missed the two removed packages in C&H, but thanks for the note on those. I'll try to do better next time
2. About slackpkg leaving config files as *.orig, that is a *really* big issue in /etc/modprobe.d/ - the explanation about it is in C&H.
 
Old 05-07-2008, 09:12 AM   #3
dive
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Good post.

The slackpkg method is how I did it, but I used a normal mirror in /etc/slackpkg/mirrors. That way you don't need download the iso.
 
Old 05-07-2008, 10:09 AM   #4
onebuck
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Hi,

Great post!
 
Old 05-07-2008, 04:19 PM   #5
pwc101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowsnipes View Post
Create List of Non-Slackware Software
Before you move on into the upgrade you need to properly assess where you are, and in particular, what non-slackware software you have installed.

By far the easiest way to do this is to use slackpkg, which you can find in /extra. Once you install it, be sure to edit blacklist, mirrors, and slackpkg.conf under /etc/slackpkg as desired (set the mirror to one for 12.0 for now). Then to get your list you can simply do
Code:
slackpkg update
slackpkg -dialog=off -batch=on -default_answer=no clean-system > NonSlackwarePackages.txt
NonSlackwarePackages.txt now contains a list of packages that aren't a part of the Slackware tree.

Now is a good time to get rid of any of those non-slackware packages that you no longer need. There is a chance that you will have to rebuild some of your custom packages after the upgrade.

I suggest organizing this list. You might want to, for instance, group some packages together that should be rebuilt or updated. You might also want to add any notes about software installed that is not packaged. It would be a good idea to refer to CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT again at this point.
First off, thanks for the great post. I'll be referring it to during my upgrade, although I'm contemplating a clean install, since I haven't done one for a couple of releases, and I'm sure there's all sorts of nastiness lurking in the recesses of /usr...

However, I'm sure I'm just being dense, I can't get slackpkg to generate a list of non-Slackware packages. When I run the second command (after the slackpkg update), I just get the slackpkg usage information output into NonSlackwarePackages.txt. I've edited the relevant files in /etc/slackpkg; is there some more obvious step I'm missing?
 
Old 05-07-2008, 10:50 PM   #6
shadowsnipes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwc101 View Post
However, I'm sure I'm just being dense, I can't get slackpkg to generate a list of non-Slackware packages. When I run the second command (after the slackpkg update), I just get the slackpkg usage information output into NonSlackwarePackages.txt. I've edited the relevant files in /etc/slackpkg; is there some more obvious step I'm missing?
It's not your fault; It's mine. I should have pointed everyone to the newer version of slackpkg, since the one released for 12.0 (slackpkg 2.61) does not have the batch argument yet. It should be safe to install slackpkg 2.70.3 from 12.1's repo instead.

I apologize for the confusion. I'll edit my HowTo promptly.
 
Old 05-07-2008, 11:11 PM   #7
rworkman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowsnipes View Post
It's not your fault; It's mine. I should have pointed everyone to the newer version of slackpkg, since the one released for 12.0 (slackpkg 2.61) does not have the batch argument yet. It should be safe to install slackpkg 2.70.3 from 12.1's repo instead.

I apologize for the confusion. I'll edit my HowTo promptly.

Point them to slackpkg.org to get the latest stable release (2.70.4 at the moment), and then do two things:
1) add slackpkg to /etc/slackpkg/blacklist so that it doesn't try to "upgrade" itself back to the version in Slackware's /extra
2) keep an eye on slackpkg.org for future updates.

* making a mental note to see about upgrading slackpkg in /patches - 2.70.3 misses the kernel-headers package due to the weird ARCH designation in the full package name.
 
Old 05-08-2008, 12:00 AM   #8
shadowsnipes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rworkman View Post
Point them to slackpkg.org to get the latest stable release (2.70.4 at the moment), and then do two things:
1) add slackpkg to /etc/slackpkg/blacklist so that it doesn't try to "upgrade" itself back to the version in Slackware's /extra
2) keep an eye on slackpkg.org for future updates.

* making a mental note to see about upgrading slackpkg in /patches - 2.70.3 misses the kernel-headers package due to the weird ARCH designation in the full package name.
I'm trying to find a good way to make the changes for now. I'm running into problems become I've reached the maximum number of character allowed in a single post (should have split this one up, I suppose). Perhaps the moderators can cut me a little slack for this post, or maybe they can insert a post right after my first that I can edit.

Or perhaps I just need to be more concise

Edit:
By the way, I did add the Warning about extra (.orig) files under /etc/modprobe.d. Thanks for the reminder about this.

Edit 2:
I managed to fit in the slackpkg info by taking out the new find commands I added to list and remove .orig files

Edit 3:
I realize now that I could probably split the HowTo up into more than one post similar to how Shilo did in the "this is how I do it all" thread. I could just put a link at the end of the first post linking to the next.

This, of course, is not ideal, but doable. I'll wait to make any major changes like that until
1) I need to add/change enough information to warrant a need to split
2) I've gotten some feedback and know that splitting is the best feasible option

Thanks for the input everybody!

Last edited by shadowsnipes; 05-08-2008 at 12:21 AM.
 
Old 05-08-2008, 04:57 AM   #9
pwc101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowsnipes View Post
It's not your fault; It's mine. I should have pointed everyone to the newer version of slackpkg, since the one released for 12.0 (slackpkg 2.61) does not have the batch argument yet. It should be safe to install slackpkg 2.70.3 from 12.1's repo instead.

I apologize for the confusion. I'll edit my HowTo promptly.
Thanks shadowsnipes and rworkman.

Upgrading to the latest version solved the problem, and revealed I have 147 packages installed that are not part of Slackware... looks like the clean install will take a while to get just how I like it!

Thank <insert favourite deity here> for SlackBuilds!
 
Old 05-09-2008, 08:22 PM   #10
mm07
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Hey All,

Getting ready to upgrade 12.0 -> 12.1.
Reading all the posts, and the general consensus is that after the upgrade, I should recompile any custom software I built and installed.
And I should pull down the latest slackbuilds stuff and re-install that as well.


So my question is:
Why should I upgrade at all?? Why not just do a clean build if I'm going to have to reinstall/recompile everything anyway. (I realized the old stuff will work, but I'm talking recommended and best practices)

So I'm undecided...
I want to try an upgrade, but it seems like a little but of a waste of time..
I have a 10G / partition, and store all my data on another partition, so if I have to reinstall my added software anyway, I'm not sure what value an upgrade buy's me.

Thoughts and opinions?
-Mike
 
Old 05-09-2008, 08:56 PM   #11
shadowsnipes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mm07 View Post
Hey All,

Getting ready to upgrade 12.0 -> 12.1.
Reading all the posts, and the general consensus is that after the upgrade, I should recompile any custom software I built and installed.
And I should pull down the latest slackbuilds stuff and re-install that as well.


So my question is:
Why should I upgrade at all?? Why not just do a clean build if I'm going to have to reinstall/recompile everything anyway. (I realized the old stuff will work, but I'm talking recommended and best practices)

So I'm undecided...
I want to try an upgrade, but it seems like a little but of a waste of time..
I have a 10G / partition, and store all my data on another partition, so if I have to reinstall my added software anyway, I'm not sure what value an upgrade buy's me.

Thoughts and opinions?
-Mike
Well, you don't have to rebuild all of your custom software. As the HowTo says, you really only need to if something is broken. In my case, I had some broken libraries, so to be safe I went ahead and rebuilt practically all of my libraries. I also rebuilt stuff like WINE because newer versions were out, but I didn't rebuild quite a few packages.

Granted, assuming you save your packages, you could just reinstall them after a clean install. The big deciding factor on whether or not to do an upgrade versus a clean install is all in the little things. Usually there are some little things that, even if you back up all your files, you might forget. It takes a lot of work to restore all those random files, and when you upgrade only some of them might change, and then it is obvious which files you need to merge. However, you can't just restore a bunch of random files after a clean install because you are bound to clobber something. You have to know which ones to restore (unless you are just reinstalling your machine as the same version as your backup- then mass restore of course should work). Therefore, you are more likely to lost some of your settings.

So, in summary, if you are happy with how your system functions, I either recommend you don't do anything or upgrade. You are more likely to be able to keep all of your settings this way.

If you are not happy with your settings, or your system is not organized at all (unpackaged software cluttering up your system) and you want a fresh start, then a clean install is the obvious choice.

Keep in mind that even if you do a clean install, some of this guide may still apply such as getting list of non-slackware software, Miscellaneous Fixes, and the software rebuilding section.

These are just my opinions on the matter, so it might be nice to hear what others say as well.
 
Old 05-09-2008, 09:01 PM   #12
SqdnGuns
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Great How-To!

I did a fresh install but this is a most informative thread.
 
Old 05-10-2008, 08:10 AM   #13
lorton
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Upgraded using "upgradepkg --install-new *tgz" in a ap d e f k kde n t tel x xap
I didn't check the lilo file & it failed to reboot (My fault).
The ps2 mouse didn't work rc.modules sorted this.
HP device didn't work so I reinstalled it, works fine.
This is my first upgrade as I usually reinstall, I have to say it went very well.
Do you think Windows is as easy to upgrade!
Thanks to all
Lez
 
Old 05-10-2008, 06:05 PM   #14
T3slider
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Distribution: Slackware64-14.0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lorton
The ps2 mouse didn't work rc.modules sorted this.
HP device didn't work so I reinstalled it, works fine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT
The psmouse module is no longer blacklisted by default; instead, it is loaded
with the imps protocol per /etc/modprobe.d/psmouse -- if you need/want a
different protocol, edit that file. Note that options declarations have
no bearing on *if* a module is loaded - they only affect *how* it is loaded.
In other words, the module should now be loaded automatically (since it's no
longer blacklisted), and the options in /etc/modprobe.d/psmouse are the ones
applied when loading it.

The /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist file has been changed significantly; be sure to
move/merge the /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.new file in its place. Also, you
must NOT leave a backup of the old blacklist file (such as blacklist.orig)
in /etc/modprobe.d/ -- ALL files in that directory are checked, so if a
module is blacklisted in *any* of them, it won't be loaded.
Your solution (editing /etc/rc.d/rc.modules) is more of a hack than the proper solution. Things have changes since 12.0, and now, instead of the psmouse module being blacklisted by default and subsequently loaded with rc.modules, the psmouse module is NOT blacklisted and is loaded using the options specified in /etc/modprobe.d/psmouse. You should comment the psmouse line in rc.modules out (thus restoring it to its original form) and try getting things working the proper way. If you leave a backup of /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist from your Slackware 12.0 installation in addition to the new /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist file from the 12.1 upgrade, both files will be checked and the psmouse module will be blacklisted (ie it will not be loaded). If there is a /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.new file, you should overwrite /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist with this file (and I mean overwrite -- again, if you leave a backup of the original file in that directory, it'll still get checked). If that's the case you should also check other .new files in /etc to make sure you merged them all (a crucial part of upgrading from 12.0 to 12.1). If you already merged/overwrote the .new files (including the one in /etc/modprobe.d), then you should make sure to delete the backup of the blacklist file from 12.0.

As for the HP device:
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT
There is a minor problem with the HPLIP and CUPS versions in Slackware 12.1;
hp-toolbox will not work unless LC_ALL is set to a UTF8 locale.
An easy workaround is to start it with "LC_ALL=$LANG.UTF8 hp-toolbox" if
you're not using a UTF8 locale. Also, your user account must be a member
of the "lp" group for hp-toolbox to work properly, and to use the scanner
portion of some (all?) HP print/scan/copy units, you'll need to be a member
of the "lp" group. This is due to the fact that hplip's udev rules set
the device with group "lp" ownership.
That information is also referenced in the original post of this thread. I'm *guessing* that was your problem -- you didn't need to reinstall HP Device Manager (aka Toolbox) to get it to work -- and now you've unnecessarily introduced a third party package that's harder to maintain and may not work 100% reliably. I would recommend reverting to the original package included with Slackware 12.1.

Please make sure to read all of the documentation (especially UPGRADE.TXT and CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT) and thoroughly before (and after) upgrading or installing fresh -- it'll give you less headaches and a better system in the end.

[edit]I've just realized that by "reinstalling" HP Device Manager you may have meant reinstalling the 12.1 package (ie there was an error during the upgrade that you fixed), in which case you may have done the right thing. However, I'm not sure how you "reinstalled" the app and therefore will leave my above advice just in case it affects you.[/edit]

Last edited by T3slider; 05-10-2008 at 06:08 PM.
 
Old 05-10-2008, 09:55 PM   #15
vvoody
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Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Shanghai,China || Sweden
Distribution: Slackware
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Great job!
I have upgraded to 12.1 following your article:-)
 
  


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