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Old 01-14-2008, 11:58 PM   #1
DAVE666
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Linux virgin??


...Thank my GOD! recently discovered Linux,as i so...badly want to ditch Bill Gates, and the whole universe he and his buddies exist in!
I will be using my PC mainly for web surfing,doing online schooling,music etc...What version of Linux would best suit my needs?
Thanks
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:00 AM   #2
AceofSpades19
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Goto www.distrowatch.com and pick a few out of the top ten and see which one you like
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:19 AM   #3
DAVE666
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Now that i have discovered this...

...amazing OS...Exactly what steps do i need to take to get one of the versions on my Hard drive?..
I actually am putting together a new PC,well building one from old used parts,a Celeron 1ghz Tualatin CPU, and a ATX CM 33 TL SKT 370 DFI MB and i would love to have Linux as its sole OS,and kiss MS goodbye!...Do i require a disk to format the new drive? Actually i am using the D drive from this PC to put in my new PC..It is on this PC right now as my secondary drive and has nothing of value on it..Could i somehow download a version,format my D and put it on the drive? And when i put the drive into the new MB will it recognize it??
The new system will be used for surfing, music,and online schooling,oh! on that note will Linux be ok for doing on line schooling?.. thats all.
Any help on how to get a version on my hard drive and install it into my new Pc would be very much appreciated..
Thanks
Dave

Last edited by DAVE666; 01-15-2008 at 09:15 AM. Reason: error
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:33 AM   #4
DAVE666
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Wow!

Quote:
Originally Posted by AceofSpades19 View Post
Goto www.distrowatch.com and pick a few out of the top ten and see which one you like
Whew! So many amazing looking versions,i have no idea which one?,since i am a begginner would Dark star be good?...Maybe all of you could view my other thread and give me a hand with my questions..As i am putting together another PC,using my D drive from this Pc,which version should i choose?
Thank you
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:38 AM   #5
farslayer
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There are many versions of Linux available and most of them are FREE !!

You can download an image file for the Linux Distribution you choose and burn it to a CDROM.

You would then put the CD you created in the CDROm drive of your new PC and boot from it(you may have to change the Settings in your PC's BIOS to make it boot from CDROM first),

follow the on screen directions for install after booting the CD,

Since this is a new install on a Computer and you are going to use the Entire Hard drive you can make that selection during install and the Installer will automatically handle that for you.

I might suggest Ubuntu as a good Linux distribution for someone just starting out.

http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download


how to burn an .iso to CD..
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BurningIsoHowto


A great reference for working with Ubuntu is http://ubuntuguide.org/ and of course this Forum

Enjoy !!
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:40 AM   #6
elliott678
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Since you are just starting, stick to something well known with a large user base. Something like PCLinuxOS, Fedora, Mandriva or Ubuntu would suit your needs well.
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:45 AM   #7
DAVE666
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Thanks alot

Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott678 View Post
Since you are just starting, stick to something well known with a large user base. Something like PCLinuxOS, Fedora, Mandriva or Ubuntu would suit your needs well.
Maybe you could view my other thread and offer me some advice?
Thanks
 
Old 01-15-2008, 12:52 AM   #8
DAVE666
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Great!:)

Quote:
Originally Posted by farslayer View Post
There are many versions of Linux available and most of them are FREE !!

You can download an image file for the Linux Distribution you choose and burn it to a CDROM.

You would then put the CD you created in the CDROm drive of your new PC and boot from it(you may have to change the Settings in your PC's BIOS to make it boot from CDROM first),

follow the on screen directions for install after booting the CD,

Since this is a new install on a Computer and you are going to use the Entire Hard drive you can make that selection during install and the Installer will automatically handle that for you.

I might suggest Ubuntu as a good Linux distribution for someone just starting out.

http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download


how to burn an .iso to CD..
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BurningIsoHowto


A great reference for working with Ubuntu is http://ubuntuguide.org/ and of course this Forum

Enjoy !!
Thank you for that great info...So just put the cd in the drive once i get everything hooked in,fire it up and the Cd will give me all the prompts.?...The drive will be formatted and clean...so once i get PC to boot off the disk,i can install Linux U as my OS on the hard drive?
Thanks for your advice
D
 
Old 01-15-2008, 01:07 AM   #9
okos
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You will have to download and burn the disk as an iso.

Once burned, keep the disk in the drive, and restart the computer.

Ubuntu for example will ask if you want to install on the hard drive.
Quote:
...The drive will be formatted and clean...
Ubuntu will format your harddrive prior to install.

I had problems with Ubuntu 7.1 I could not get any of the programs to respond once installed. I checked md5 everything was correct. I had also tried Kubuntu in the past. My computer crashed the second time on booting Kubuntu.

Ubuntu is based on Debian. You might want to try that one.

Last edited by okos; 01-15-2008 at 01:11 AM.
 
Old 01-15-2008, 05:30 AM   #10
barbex
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Personally I would recommend Ubuntu.
I have tried openSuse 10.3 and the last three versions of Ubuntu and I would strongly recommend Ubuntu for anyone just starting with Linux.

And remember: Linux is not difficult, just different!
 
Old 01-15-2008, 09:03 AM   #11
DAVE666
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I was wondering what..

Quote:
Originally Posted by okos View Post
You will have to download and burn the disk as an iso.

Once burned, keep the disk in the drive, and restart the computer.

Ubuntu for example will ask if you want to install on the hard drive.
Ubuntu will format your harddrive prior to install.

I had problems with Ubuntu 7.1 I could not get any of the programs to respond once installed. I checked md5 everything was correct. I had also tried Kubuntu in the past. My computer crashed the second time on booting Kubuntu.

Ubuntu is based on Debian. You might want to try that one.
Exactly is ISO?
Thanks
 
Old 01-15-2008, 09:12 AM   #12
pixellany
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.iso is a file extension typically used for files which are CD images. I presume it somehow relates the ISO9660 standard for CD format.

A Linux distro typically comes as an image (iso file) which is used to burn the CD or DVD. Typical burning SW includes that option.

For various ways of installing, etc. the "getting started" link below might help.
 
Old 01-15-2008, 09:19 AM   #13
DAVE666
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Thank you

Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
.iso is a file extension typically used for files which are CD images. I presume it somehow relates the ISO9660 standard for CD format.

A Linux distro typically comes as an image (iso file) which is used to burn the CD or DVD. Typical burning SW includes that option.

For various ways of installing, etc. the "getting started" link below might help.
What version would you say is the best for myself? I do online schooling,surf the web and music on my PC,is Ubuntu the best overall?
Thanks
 
Old 01-15-2008, 09:53 AM   #14
DAVE666
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Thanks to all for the help...
I look forward to beginning my project today of putting together the new PC and firing it up with Ubuntu as my OS ......GOOD BYE MS! AND KISS MY... lol.
I will keep everyone posted on my experiences with Linux
Any good basic tutorials to get me started??
As well when i put the disk in, my new pc will read from the CD rom(once i change bios settings)..I guess i just follow the prompts...Once i have the PC up and Unbuntu as my OS,will i be faced with any driver issues etc..I guess i am saying are there any phantoms lurking for me on the horizon?
Thanks
 
Old 01-15-2008, 10:06 AM   #15
philwynk
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Another vote for Ubuntu

I picked Fedora as my Linux starting point, but I'm a old Berkeley UNIX geek and wanted to get the full tour of administrating a Linux server. I'm getting precisely what I asked for -- a full tour of administration. Fedora is NOT beginner-friendly. Lots of things I want to do, I have to do manually or can't do at all. They're about properly configuring software, and I don't have the know-how to do it correctly the first time. Example: there are certain types of video files that I can't view at all, and other types where i have to clip the link location and make it part of a command-line statement in the terminal window.

Ubuntu is famously user-friendly and has a broad user base; I think you have a better chance of being able to get the main functions working without much difficulty.

A little editorial note: while Linux is free, much more efficient with your machine, and doesn't freeze, it's not nearly as seamless as Gates World. You may come to appreciate Billy-bob's expensive toy computer in time.
 
  


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