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Old 09-28-2009, 01:30 AM   #1
beckettisdogg
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Is dual boot still possible with Sun Virtual Box?


let's say I create a guest operating system with Slackware Linux. Is dual-boot still possible? After I install the guest operating system, is it going to give me the option of dual-boot next time I turn on my laptop?

My opinion is it is not going to happen because the virtual hard disk will not recognize the Windows partition? The virutal disk will appear to my installation of guest operating system (Slackware Linux) as though it is a clean hard disk? with no Windows at all?

Last edited by beckettisdogg; 09-28-2009 at 02:23 AM.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 01:58 AM   #2
MrCode
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If I'm correct in assuming that you're asking if you can dual-boot Slack and Windows from within your VM, then no, I don't belive that's possible. When you create a virtual hard disk in VirtualBox, you're creating a disk image file that is stored (by default) in your ~/.VirtualBox/HardDisks directory. As far as the VM is concered, it's running in a *sterile* environment that has no real relation to the host OS (maybe with the exception of shared folders and networking, if enabled), and is using the image file as a HDD.

In short: Think of the virtual hard disk as a HDD within your existing HDD. No partitions or anything, just an empty HDD (that is, until you format it and install Slackware or Windows, whichever you're going to put in the VM ).

On the other hand, if you're asking if you can still dual-boot on the host system (your real machine) after setting up a VM, then yes, you should be able to, as the virtual HDD is just a file on your physical HDD. But for that same reason, you won't be able to boot into Slack (which is on the virtual HDD) on your real machine.

I hope that answers your question(s)

If not, please go ahead and elaborate more on what you're trying to do.

Last edited by MrCode; 09-28-2009 at 02:03 AM.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 02:00 AM   #3
lutusp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
let's say I create a guest host operating system with Slackware Linux. Is dual-boot still possible? After I install the guest operating system, is it going to give me the option of dual-boot next time I turn on my laptop?

My opinion is it is not going to happen because the virtual hard disk will not recognize the Windows partition? The virutal disk will appear to my installation of guest operating system (Slackware Linux) as though it is a clean hard disk? with no Windows at all?
Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
let's say I create a guest host operating system with Slackware Linux.
That's a great start. Which did you mean -- guest or host?

Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
Is dual-boot still possible?
Only if you decide whether the new OS is guest or host.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
After I install the guest operating system, is it going to give me the option of dual-boot next time I turn on my laptop?
Yes, but only if you make this happen, carefully. If you meant to ask whether this is a normal thing, to be expected, the answer is yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
My opinion is it is not going to happen because the virtual hard disk will not recognize the Windows partition? The virutal disk will appear to my installation of guest operating system (Slackware Linux) as though it is a clean hard disk? with no Windows at all?
When did this become a virtual machine? Okay, just stop. Please post again and explain what you are trying to do. But first look up terms like "guest", "host" and "virtual", so you are using these terms with their common meanings.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 02:28 AM   #4
beckettisdogg
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I first installed winxp, and then I installed slackware, it gave me option of dual-boot next time I turned my laptop on, neither Slack nor xp never had any trouble running on my inspiron.

and I tried to install Virtal Box, did not work, after thinking and observing for a few days and I noticed the general rule on Sun Virutal Box is you install Virtual Box first and then you install your guest operating system next.

Is there any way to enable dual-boot and run Virtual Box at the same time? It is possible theoretically, but it is rather inefficient, unpractical and unlogical. It is like this. You install two Slackwares. One inside your Windows partition, and one outside your Windows partition.

if there is a way to have only one Linux and enable dual-boot, could you tell me how?

thanks!!

Go Linux Questions!!

Last edited by beckettisdogg; 09-28-2009 at 02:31 AM.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 03:20 AM   #5
lutusp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
I first installed winxp, and then I installed slackware, it gave me option of dual-boot next time I turned my laptop on, neither Slack nor xp never had any trouble running on my inspiron.

and I tried to install Virtal Box, did not work, after thinking and observing for a few days and I noticed the general rule on Sun Virutal Box is you install Virtual Box first and then you install your guest operating system next.

Is there any way to enable dual-boot and run Virtual Box at the same time? It is possible theoretically, but it is rather inefficient, unpractical and unlogical. It is like this. You install two Slackwares. One inside your Windows partition, and one outside your Windows partition.

if there is a way to have only one Linux and enable dual-boot, could you tell me how?

thanks!!

Go Linux Questions!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
Is there any way to enable dual-boot and run Virtual Box at the same time?
Sure there is. Buy two computers. Please, could you just say what you want to happen, in plain, declarative sentences?

You are talking about an Xp/Slackware dual boot arrangement, then throwing in mentions of VirtualBox as though it can fit into the conversation. It can't. Virtualbox is a virtual machine that must be a running application on either XP or Slackware (you don't say which). But it can't be booted directly from your system's boot menu.

YOU HAVE A DUAL BOOT SYSTEM WITH XP AND SLACKWARE RUNNING -- YES OR NO?

YOU HAVE A COPY OF VIRTUALBOX RUNNING IN XP OR SLACKWARE -- WHICH?

YOU WANT TO CHANGE YOUR SYSTEM IN WHICH SPECIFIC WAY -- FILL IN THE BLANK: _____________________________________________________

No more rambling. Simple, declarative sentences.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 03:48 AM   #6
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
I first installed winxp, and then I installed slackware, it gave me option of dual-boot next time I turned my laptop on, neither Slack nor xp never had any trouble running on my inspiron.

and I tried to install Virtal Box, did not work, after thinking and observing for a few days and I noticed the general rule on Sun Virutal Box is you install Virtual Box first and then you install your guest operating system next.

Is there any way to enable dual-boot and run Virtual Box at the same time? It is possible theoretically, but it is rather inefficient, unpractical and unlogical. It is like this. You install two Slackwares. One inside your Windows partition, and one outside your Windows partition.

if there is a way to have only one Linux and enable dual-boot, could you tell me how?
I still do not understand what you have done or what you are trying to do. The Virtual Box User Manual (download PDF) is very good and has a section on Virtualization basics that might help you to help us to understand what you are trying to do.

VirtualBox is simply a program that runs on the host OS. Files (or unformatted partitions) on the host are used as data storage areas by VirtualBox when it creates virtual HDDs for guest operating systems. Note that these are HDDs -- not partitions, not file systems -- which makes sense because that's what the OS sees when it is running on real hardware.

Because VirtualBox is simply a program that runs under the host OS it cannot affect any multiple boot on the real hardware. It isn't running when the host OS boots/starts.

When you configure a virtual machine in VirtualBox and start it, VirtualBox creates it with virtual BIOS, HDD(s), memory etc., (almost exactly) like a real computer. Like a real computer it will boot whatever is bootable on the HDD(s) according to the standard boot mechanism. Like a real computer this could be a multiple boot configuration giving a choice of OSes to boot/start.

Because the virtual machine's HDDs are simply files-or-partitions on the host, you should (TM) be able to dual boot either XP or Linux on the real hardware, install VirtualBox on both and configure the same VMs in both. If using host files for the virtual HDDs, they would have to be on a file system accessible from both XP and Linux such as FAT32. In this way, theoretically you should be able to run the same virtual machine(s) on more than one host OS -- XP or Linux.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 04:25 AM   #7
brianL
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Add me to the list of the confused.
You've got XP and Slackware dual-booted.
You've got VirtualBox installed on XP?
You've got another Slackware installed in VirtualBox?
Now what are you asking?
 
Old 09-28-2009, 04:43 AM   #8
beckettisdogg
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yes I have sun virtual box on the xp partition. Therefore Slackware would be the guest OS I tried to run on winxp. However, after I had Slackware and XP dual-booting and both of them running properly, I realized that Virtual Box was requiring me to install a guest operating system on a virtual hard disk, instead of letting virtual box on my xp know that I already have an existing slackware installation.

What I am trying to do:

Windows XP and Slackware dual-boot.
run Slackware as the guest OS while running XP.

When I become more proficient with Slackware and everything runs smoothly, I will of course do it the other way around. Run XP as the guest OS on Slackware. However, I am still in the stage of learning Linux
 
Old 09-28-2009, 04:50 AM   #9
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beckettisdogg View Post
yes I have sun virtual box on the xp partition. Therefore Slackware would be the guest OS I tried to run on winxp. However, after I had Slackware and XP dual-booting and both of them running properly, I realized that Virtual Box was requiring me to install a guest operating system on a virtual hard disk, instead of letting virtual box on my xp know that I already have an existing slackware installation.

What I am trying to do:

Windows XP and Slackware dual-boot.
run Slackware as the guest OS while running XP.

When I become more proficient with Slackware and everything runs smoothly, I will of course do it the other way around. Run XP as the guest OS on Slackware. However, I am still in the stage of learning Linux
Thanks, that's clear now. Rather than installing Slackware on the real hardware as you did, you need to define a virtual machine in VirtualBox, start that virtual machine and install Slackware in it. I did that recently and it's straightforward -- you can mount the Slackware CD .iso files (on the host) in the virtual machine's CD-and-DVD drive and boot from the first. Make sure you have defined the boot order in the virtual machine to include CD-and-DVD drive.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 05:24 AM   #10
beckettisdogg
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Is it still possible to enable my laptop to dual-boot? if yes, what are the steps? thanks!!

Last edited by beckettisdogg; 09-28-2009 at 05:33 AM.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 05:33 AM   #11
brianL
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I thought you were already dual-booting?
 
Old 09-28-2009, 05:41 AM   #12
beckettisdogg
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you know what guys, nevermind. I give up. I will just try to figure out what I have to do to do what I want to do myself. UGH~!

Last edited by beckettisdogg; 09-28-2009 at 05:57 AM.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 05:45 AM   #13
beckettisdogg
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Here is a message from someone that also helped me.

Quote:
First, I will clarify a few concepts that might be easily misunderstood by a lot of people that may be asking the same question. Dual boot is when you have two operating systems physically installed on one computer, but each OS resides on either a separate disk or separate partition. In this configuration you choose which OS to run when you boot the machine and you normally cannot run both operating systems simultaneously since your computer's hardware is not capable of doing so. Virtualization is something completely different. With virtualization, you run one operating system normally as a "host OS", and this OS runs software which creates a virtual environment that allows a separate operating system to run simultaneously as a "guest OS". There are different types of virtualization which are used to accommodate different needs.

With VirtualBox, you will never be able to dual boot a virtual machine because it uses a type of virtualization that creates a virtual hardware environment that the guest OS is dependent on. In this situation you will always have to run the host OS first in order to create the virtual hardware that the guest OS needs. The guest OS cannot use physical hardware.

However, there is another type of virtualization that uses a combination of both physical and virtual hardware in order to allow a physical OS to be virtualized when needed. An example of software that does this is VMware Workstation.

If you first do physical installations of Windows and Linux in a dual boot configuration, you can then virtualize the operating systems within each other using VMware Workstation. In this configuration, when running a virtual machine, the physical disks and the physical OS' are used as normal, but other parts of the hardware environment are virtualized, allowing multiple operating systems to run simultaneously. Because only physical disks are used, these operating systems can operate as either physical or virtual at any time.

All types of virtualization demand a great deal of computer resources so if you are going to be using both operating systems considerably, I would recommend using the VMware solution instead of VirtualBox as VirtualBox splits your computers resources across two OS' any time want to run the guest machine. VMware is not open source, but the performance gain you will get with the dual boot option is worth the money.
 
Old 09-28-2009, 06:00 AM   #14
brianL
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Quote:
If you first do physical installations of Windows and Linux in a dual boot configuration, you can then virtualize the operating systems within each other using VMware Workstation.
Is that what you want to do?
 
Old 09-28-2009, 06:02 AM   #15
beckettisdogg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
Is that what you want to do?
yes it is.
 
  


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