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Old 05-02-2012, 04:17 AM   #31
Steviepower
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Registered: May 2010
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Distribution: ubuntu/debian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whysoserious View Post
I would recommend Ubuntu Server, best for start up. You could also install Gnome or a GUI if you prefer!
Even though it might not make it easier to do what you want with it. the server installation is still not point and click but commandline. I've made this mistake in the past myself, it's easier to learn to use vim/nano/vi/emacs/butterfly to edit config files.
 
Old 05-02-2012, 04:31 AM   #32
whysoserious
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steviepower View Post
Even though it might not make it easier to do what you want with it. the server installation is still not point and click but commandline. I've made this mistake in the past myself, it's easier to learn to use vim/nano/vi/emacs/butterfly to edit config files.
Good point. To be honest I would say Debian is great for what he wants to do. Ubuntu server is very similar to Debian though, so its upto you really.
 
Old 05-02-2012, 05:30 AM   #33
Steviepower
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yeah big difference between the two is that debian does not use things like sudo and more "classic" commands. I would say it's always best to start with debian because you learn how it works. With ubuntu it's eventually easier to work secure without much configuration. For example the different ways to start/stop a service "/etc/init.d/apache2 stop" in debian wich makes it clear you're using scrips versus "service apache2 stop"
 
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Old 05-02-2012, 05:40 AM   #34
whysoserious
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Registered: May 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steviepower View Post
yeah big difference between the two is that debian does not use things like sudo and more "classic" commands. I would say it's always best to start with debian because you learn how it works. With ubuntu it's eventually easier to work secure without much configuration. For example the different ways to start/stop a service "/etc/init.d/apache2 stop" in debian wich makes it clear you're using scrips versus "service apache2 stop"
If one wants to truly learn computing and Linux, Slackware is the way to go. Sudo is a very important element, true say
 
  


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