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Old 10-07-2003, 08:01 AM   #1
edhan
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Question Groupadd and useradd for RH 8.0 ???


Hi

Any idea why I can't use the command useradd or groupadd ? Executing it and it says command not found.

Please advice and let me know how I can use it. Thanks!

Regards
Edward Han
 
Old 10-07-2003, 08:21 AM   #2
Demonbane
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proably
/usr/sbin/useradd
/usr/sbin/groupadd
 
Old 10-07-2003, 08:21 AM   #3
Looking_Lost
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If you logged in initially as root it's location is not in your path

If you used

su
password

do

su -
password

either way it's probably in /usr/sbin/groupadd

or

/sbin/groupadd

whatever works
 
Old 10-07-2003, 08:28 AM   #4
edhan
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hi

It is in the path /usr/sbin/groupadd

but when execute, it says command not found. I am logon as root.

Same goes with useradd. It says command not found also.

How can I activate both the command?

Any idea?

Edward Han

Last edited by edhan; 10-07-2003 at 08:32 AM.
 
Old 10-07-2003, 08:55 AM   #5
adz
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The command is actually adduser not useradd.
 
Old 10-07-2003, 09:08 AM   #6
edhan
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Hi

Tried adduser and addgroup, it still says command not found.

Regards
Edward Han
 
Old 10-07-2003, 09:33 AM   #7
adz
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Works for me. It might not be in your path variable. Type find / -iname adduser at the prompt as root. If nothing comes up then that's bizarre and quite possibly not healthy. I don't use RH and I know it's different but that's a core linux/unix command. Ignore any hits you get that are in a directory called "doc". That's all documentation. On my computer it's in /usr/sbin.
 
Old 10-07-2003, 09:43 AM   #8
edhan
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Hi

Mine is useradd and groupadd are in the path /usr/sbin/ but not adduser or addgroup.

But I do not know why it says command not found when executing.

Regards
Edward Han
 
Old 10-07-2003, 10:27 AM   #9
Looking_Lost
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just as a test

log in as root then type either the full way or using su

export PATH=/usr/sbin:$PATH


try

useradd or groupadd

again
 
Old 10-07-2003, 10:32 AM   #10
adz
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OK go to the directory and type ls -l *add. Check to see if they have executable permissions. If so then type ./useradd from that directory. Also, double check your path variable. Type echo $PATH and see if /usr/sbin is among the output.

Last edited by adz; 10-07-2003 at 10:34 AM.
 
Old 10-07-2003, 07:27 PM   #11
edhan
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Hi adz

The rights is okay. When trying ./useradd, it shows the command. When echo $PATH, it is not in the path. How do I add its path?

Thanks!

Regards
Edward Han
 
Old 10-07-2003, 10:19 PM   #12
adz
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It shows the command? You mean it runs/executes it? Well that should fix your adding user probs. To add /usr/sbin to your PATH variable use the command that Looking_Lost suggested: export PATH=/usr/sbin:$PATH. That just adds /usr/sbin to the PATH variable without overwriting any of the previous entries. To get this every time on boot just add that line to one of the startup scripts. The problem is that you just want to add it to root's one and not to everyone's. I'm not entirely sure how to do that.
 
Old 10-08-2003, 12:08 AM   #13
edhan
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Hi

Okay. Your instruction works when I execute export PATH=/usr/sbin:$PATH

Thanks!

Regards
Edward Han
 
  


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