LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > Programming
User Name
Password
Programming This forum is for all programming questions.
The question does not have to be directly related to Linux and any language is fair game.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-10-2017, 07:53 PM   #61
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware (current), FreeBSD, Win10, It varies
Posts: 9,952

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148

is this max files 999 a limitation on python and or perl? because Linux says
Code:
userx%slackwhere ⚡ ~ ⚡> df -i /media/data/          
Filesystem       Inodes  IUsed    IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/sdb1      49323828 114545 49209283    1% /media/data
userx%slackwhere ⚡ ~ ⚡>
 
Old 07-10-2017, 08:29 PM   #62
Sefyir
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2015
Distribution: Linux Mint
Posts: 630

Rep: Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by BW-userx View Post
is this max files 999 a limitation on python and or perl? because Linux says
Code:
userx%slackwhere ⚡ ~ ⚡> df -i /media/data/          
Filesystem       Inodes  IUsed    IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/sdb1      49323828 114545 49209283    1% /media/data
userx%slackwhere ⚡ ~ ⚡>
A limitation of the original spec

Unless you can find a way to put something greater than 999 in file-xxx-xxxxx.ext

Changing it to file-xxxx-xxxxxxxx.ext would be pretty easy by changing this part in file python file:

{num:03d} to {num:04d}

Last edited by Sefyir; 07-10-2017 at 08:33 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-10-2017, 08:36 PM   #63
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware (current), FreeBSD, Win10, It varies
Posts: 9,952

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sefyir View Post
A limitation of the original spec

Unless you can find a way to put something greater than 999 in file-xxx-xxxxx.ext

Changing it to file-xxxx-xxxxxxxx.ext would be pretty easy by changing this part in file python file:

{num:03d} to {num:04d}
ok I see where you're coming from the logic behind that. as I couldn't understand the code. hehe

999 being the highest set or 3 digits.

so just off the top of my head this is interatated as
Code:
{num:03d}
3 digits leading with zero's?

Last edited by BW-userx; 07-10-2017 at 08:40 PM.
 
Old 07-10-2017, 08:59 PM   #64
Sefyir
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2015
Distribution: Linux Mint
Posts: 630

Rep: Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by BW-userx View Post
ok I see where you're coming from the logic behind that. as I couldn't understand the code. hehe

999 being the highest set or 3 digits.

so just off the top of my head this is interatated as
Code:
{num:03d}
3 digits leading with zero's?
Yes. Well 1 is represented as 001, 456 is represented as 456.

However, it occurs to me this wasn't a very flexible way of doing this!
I changed a line:
Code:
from 
    full_range = set('{num:03d}'.format(num=num) for num in range(1, max_range + 1))
to
    full_range = set(str(num).rjust(len(str(max_range)), '0') for num in range(1, max_range + 1))
To explain this line:
It creates a set of strings that is right justified to the length of the max_range (which is detected by finding the maximum value discovered by regex. For example file-9999.ext or file-9999.adsghsdfg.ext.

So If the max found is 99999
instead of printing:
1
it prints
00001

It does it for each value using a concept called comprehensions in python. You can be incredibly expressive with them! It would be similar to writing in english

for num in range 1 to 99999
create string num. If string num is less then 5 characters long, pad enough to make it 5 long.
In this case, create 00001.

Or written out in longer python

Code:
# full_range = set(str(num).rjust(len(str(max_range)), '0') for num in range(1, max_range + 1))

full_range = set()
for num in range(1, max_range + 1):
    string_width = len(str(max_range)
    justified_string = str(num).rjust(string_width, 0)
    full_range.add(justified_string)
 
Old 07-10-2017, 09:24 PM   #65
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware (current), FreeBSD, Win10, It varies
Posts: 9,952

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sefyir View Post
Yes. Well 1 is represented as 001, 456 is represented as 456.

However, it occurs to me this wasn't a very flexible way of doing this!
I changed a line:
Code:
from 
    full_range = set('{num:03d}'.format(num=num) for num in 
range(1, max_range + 1))
to
    full_range = set(str(num).rjust(len(str(max_range)), '0') for num in range(1, max_range + 1))
To explain this line:
It creates a set of strings that is right justified to the length of the max_range (which is detected by finding the maximum value discovered by regex. For example file-9999.ext or file-9999.adsghsdfg.ext.

So If the max found is 99999
instead of printing:
1
it prints
00001

It does it for each value using a concept called comprehensions in python. You can be incredibly expressive with them! It would be similar to writing in english

for num in range 1 to 99999
create string num. If string num is less then 5 characters long, pad enough to make it 5 long.
In this case, create 00001.

Or written out in longer python

Code:
# full_range = set(str(num).rjust(len(str(max_range)), '0') for num in range(1, max_range + 1))

full_range = set()
for num in range(1, max_range + 1):
    string_width = len(str(max_range)
    justified_string = str(num).rjust(string_width, 0)
    full_range.add(justified_string)
Passing function call return values in prams is always cooler
 
Old 07-13-2017, 11:13 PM   #66
Sefyir
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2015
Distribution: Linux Mint
Posts: 630

Rep: Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315
I decided to make a small project out of that code (referenced here) and implemented it using classes.
I simplified the regex a bit, to just (\d+) so that it matches the first sequence of digits. I suspect this is pretty common. 001.ext is fine, so is file001.ext.
Be careful having things like 001.ext and file001.ext in the same directory however, since that's now effectively the same thing

It's now quite usable as a cli tool.
You can do tricky stuff like

Code:
$ echo './' | ./SequencyConsistency.py
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing:
0006
7829
Code:
find . -type d | ./SequencyConsistency.py
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing/4527_a:
945
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing/4526_a:
159
Code:
./SequencyConsistency.py */
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing/4527_a:
945
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing/4526_a:
159
 
Old 07-14-2017, 08:19 AM   #67
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware (current), FreeBSD, Win10, It varies
Posts: 9,952

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sefyir View Post
I decided to make a small project out of that code (referenced here) and implemented it using classes.
I simplified the regex a bit, to just (\d+) so that it matches the first sequence of digits. I suspect this is pretty common. 001.ext is fine, so is file001.ext.
Be careful having things like 001.ext and file001.ext in the same directory however, since that's now effectively the same thing

It's now quite usable as a cli tool.
You can do tricky stuff like

Code:
$ echo './' | ./SequencyConsistency.py
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing:
0006
7829
Code:
find . -type d | ./SequencyConsistency.py
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing/4527_a:
945
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing/4526_a:
159
Code:
./SequencyConsistency.py */
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing/4527_a:
945
Missing from /foo/bar/numbered_testing/4526_a:
159
rather interesting: I do suppose that one you or another qualified individual verse in python could even expand on that same code.

Leaving that as a default and adding cli arguments for name patterns to eliminate the glitch of 001.ext and Name001.ext and Name-001.ext as being seen as the same thing while running it though so one can not have that problem.

let me go copy paste that and give it a go said the bear that climb the hill.

Code:
using the ole'  search path piped to local ./dir script method I see yes?
echo './' | ./SequencyConsistency.py
I've never done that before.

Waaaaaaa Slack got
Code:
userx%slackwhere ⚡ python ⚡> whereis python
python: /usr/bin/python2.7-config /usr/bin/python2.7 /usr/bin/python /usr/lib64/python2.7 /usr/include/python2.7 /usr/man/man1/python.1.gz
userx%slackwhere ⚡ python ⚡>
No 3 - now I got a install that just to check this?

Last edited by BW-userx; 07-14-2017 at 08:26 AM.
 
Old 07-14-2017, 08:51 AM   #68
Sefyir
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2015
Distribution: Linux Mint
Posts: 630

Rep: Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315
Quote:
No 3 - now I got a install that just to check this?
Don't feel too rushed :P python3 has been out since 2008 and python2 EOL is in 3 years (2020)

But the hiccup seems to be with a print statement:

Change the below bolded part and it seems to run ok:
Code:
print(err, file=sys.stderr)
print(err)
However missing directories or listed files will probably log a error into stdout and not stderr


Quote:
rather interesting: I do suppose that one you or another qualified individual verse in python could even expand on that same code.
Leaving that as a default and adding cli arguments for name patterns
Interesting idea, that wouldn't be hard to put in.
 
Old 07-14-2017, 09:14 AM   #69
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware (current), FreeBSD, Win10, It varies
Posts: 9,952

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sefyir View Post
Don't feel too rushed :P
Interesting idea, that wouldn't be hard to put in.
then awk and sed and find was invented... or things like egrep - pgrep which are honed down for just specif needs.


Quote:
python3 has been out since 2008 and python2 EOL is in 3 years (2020)
so I wonder why Slack don't ship with it. Not that i use it or perl for that matter. I decided BASH was enough for what I do.

Last edited by BW-userx; 07-14-2017 at 09:22 AM.
 
Old 07-14-2017, 10:15 PM   #70
Sefyir
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2015
Distribution: Linux Mint
Posts: 630

Rep: Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by BW-userx View Post
then awk and sed and find was invented... or things like egrep - pgrep which are honed down for just specif needs.

so I wonder why Slack don't ship with it. Not that i use it or perl for that matter. I decided BASH was enough for what I do.
awk, sed and find are all great (I use find a lot). You almost certainly use python however. Try running grep -IE '#!.*python' /usr/bin/* -m1 to examine many python scripts you're already using
Bash is great, but its specialty is interacting with the operating system. Converting files, downloading files, permissions. It's really good for doing simple jobs efficiently. I have over a hundred of one liner functions.
IMO, don't bother learning another language until (if) you notice bash feeling "weak" for a job. I used bash solely for 4 years and managed fine.
However, learning python (still very new) has shown it has a nice similarity in unix, most "modules" does its job only and does it well.


Parsing arguments is pretty easy in python. Feel free to trial it. Run it with -h to see the options. Also, it should now work fine in python2.7 thanks to the futures import (from __future__ import print_function)

If you want to easily use it (without installing python3), you can change python3 to python in #!/usr/bin/env python3 in a file called SequencyConsistency.py, run chmod +x SequencyConsistency.py and move it to /usr/local/bin/SequencyConsistency.
Then you should be able to just call it: $ SequencyConsistency.

Regular Expression Syntax for python (using re module)

Code:
SequencyConsistency -g3 -e '(file)(-)(\d+)(-)(\w+)([.]\w+)' foobar/*/
find foobar/ -type d | SequencyConsistency --group 3 --regexp '(file)(-)(\d+)(-)(\w+)([.]\w+)'
If your file is file-xxx-xxxxxx.ext you can do something simpler like:

Code:
SequencyConsistency -g1 -e 'file-(\d+)-\w+[.]\w+' foobar/*/'

Last edited by Sefyir; 07-14-2017 at 10:17 PM.
 
Old 07-15-2017, 08:39 AM   #71
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware (current), FreeBSD, Win10, It varies
Posts: 9,952

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148Reputation: 2148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sefyir View Post
awk, sed and find are all great (I use find a lot). You almost certainly use python however. Try running grep -IE '#!.*python' /usr/bin/* -m1 to examine many python scripts you're already using
Bash is great, but its specialty is interacting with the operating system. Converting files, downloading files, permissions. It's really good for doing simple jobs efficiently. I have over a hundred of one liner functions.
IMO, don't bother learning another language until (if) you notice bash feeling "weak" for a job. I used bash solely for 4 years and managed fine.
However, learning python (still very new) has shown it has a nice similarity in unix, most "modules" does its job only and does it well.


Parsing arguments is pretty easy in python. Feel free to trial it. Run it with -h to see the options. Also, it should now work fine in python2.7 thanks to the futures import (from __future__ import print_function)

If you want to easily use it (without installing python3), you can change python3 to python in #!/usr/bin/env python3 in a file called SequencyConsistency.py, run chmod +x SequencyConsistency.py and move it to /usr/local/bin/SequencyConsistency.
Then you should be able to just call it: $ SequencyConsistency.

Regular Expression Syntax for python (using re module)

Code:
SequencyConsistency -g3 -e '(file)(-)(\d+)(-)(\w+)([.]\w+)' foobar/*/
find foobar/ -type d | SequencyConsistency --group 3 --regexp '(file)(-)(\d+)(-)(\w+)([.]\w+)'
If your file is file-xxx-xxxxxx.ext you can do something simpler like:

Code:
SequencyConsistency -g1 -e 'file-(\d+)-\w+[.]\w+' foobar/*/'
yeah regex is something I should work on -- then I see it is different depending on what one is using? perl has its regex for perl and now you're telling me python has its regex for it so indicates a difference between the two without examining btw.

indicating no standardization which it should be if not. Just makes life easier is all.

and yes so far BASH has been just fine - someone just suggested to show me how to get this question done using perl and if it works why be prejudice against it?

then came curiosity and I decided that looking at Perl and doing little easy things like creating a dir and sub dir all at once perl nope, not as easy, searching a dir and its sub dir nope not as easy,

not something as simple as find / searches everything where perl will not look into the sub dir'es at all.

for me to take a bash script that already works just like I told it to and to just re do it in perl just to see what I could see when I already have a fully working script - too much - I'd have to add two or three more lines of code to do what I did with one line of code in BASH.

learning curve too big of a headache for me to be honest. It to me is not worth figuring out how to do it in perl when I am already doing it just fine in BASH.

It is not like I am going to get a job doing this so that too is no incentive to learn a different programming lang. just to know it.

Last edited by BW-userx; 07-15-2017 at 08:44 AM.
 
Old 07-15-2017, 08:52 PM   #72
Sefyir
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2015
Distribution: Linux Mint
Posts: 630

Rep: Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315Reputation: 315
regex is standardized.. but each "flavor" has its own notations that do a little extra.
After all, why doesn't everyone write in sh instead of bash? Cause bash can do more, even if it's less compatible.. giving it a "flavor"
Regex permeates into almost everything and can make learning tools like vim easier. I would suggest learning the basics.
There are many options. Ignore advanced ones (avoid overloading information about specific flavors) and regex will make a lot more sense.

Luckily, writing regex is a lot easier then reading it :P You're thinking -> Ok, I want to match a line starting (^) with digits ([0-9]) that will occur at least once (+), then a set of alphanumeric characters ([a-zA-Z0-9]) that will occur at least once (+), then I want to match a period but because a . also means "any character" I'll place it in a set ([.]) and finally the extension of alphanumeric characters ([a-zA-Z0-9]) between 1 and 4 characters long ({1,4}). Then make sure this is the end of the line ($)

So you end up with '^[0-9]+[a-zA-Z0-9]+[.][a-zA-Z0-9]{1,4}$'
Or in python regex '^\d+\w+[.]\w{1,4}$'

Hopefully that helps a little!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] Replace text string with sequential numbers inside a textfile K-Veikko Programming 3 04-07-2013 03:23 AM
[SOLVED] find the total of numbers that are higher than x in a text file with numbers (using awk??) Mike_V Programming 12 11-24-2010 09:51 AM
[SOLVED] Replace sequential numbers in a file with a different sequence using sed thefiend Linux - Newbie 6 04-12-2010 10:29 PM
HOWTO convert a group of files in a directory to a set of sequential numbers? lleb Linux - General 7 12-24-2009 07:02 PM
sequence of numbers, how to extract which numbers are missing jonlake Programming 13 06-26-2006 03:28 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > Programming

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:36 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration