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Old 08-08-2003, 01:03 AM   #1
frostbite
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Using Sudo


I want to give myself root permissions by using sudo but I've been stuck at configuring the sudoers file.

Does anyone know how to configure sudo so that each time i log in i will have root permissions?
 
Old 08-08-2003, 01:16 AM   #2
twantrd
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Yea, that's easy...in the sudoers file they already gave some examples of usage. So anyhow, lets say your username is "johnnie". You would add this line:

johnnie ALL=(ALL) ALL

If you noticed, root has that exact same line. That's it...you're done.

Of course you can't run root commands by just typing in the command. You have to put "sudo" before the command.

-twantrd
 
Old 08-08-2003, 01:27 AM   #3
frostbite
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can i have privilages that allow me to do more things other than run commands? for example view directories or change system settings without using terminal?
 
Old 08-08-2003, 04:15 AM   #4
320mb
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Quote:
Originally posted by frostbite
change system settings without using terminal?
It is not a good IDEA for a USER to change system settings. this is what ROOT is for.
 
Old 08-08-2003, 09:17 AM   #5
Strike
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Actually I prefer the line:
Code:
username    ALL = NOPASSWD : ALL
And then you never have to enter in a password.

However, sudo is only for terminals, though there are other graphical apps that allow you to su in an X environment, like gnomesu and kdesu.
 
Old 08-08-2003, 03:22 PM   #6
frostbite
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because i am the root, but i dont wanna log in using root, wanna use my name instead so i kinda have a nice home folder with my name in it and stuff
 
Old 08-08-2003, 06:55 PM   #7
MasterC
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If you search the board, it's been covered reluctantly a few times. It's really really really not a good idea. You'll be logging in as root everyday in such a situation, and then there goes half your safety net! Unless you are an uber-guru, which even then you would realize how bad it is and not do it, you shouldn't give a user all of root's priv's. Using the sudoers file is the closest I'd think one should come to doing so.

And as a side note to my above statement: If you were that guru who decided to, you'd by that time know how

Cool
 
Old 08-09-2003, 04:13 AM   #8
Strike
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There's nothing at all wrong with granting the "normal user" that you (the actual owner and admin of the machine) "effective root" every time they log in by using the sudoers line I posted above. The only slight difference in security is that if someone can pop into your normal user's account, they can root your box. But if that's happening, you have other more serious problems already than having sudo set up the way it was. I actually highly recommend using sudo the way I described above. It makes doing admin tasks rather easy without making it so braindead as to not know what you are doing.

Note: this is the only way I advocate giving "effective root" (passwordless even) to any normal user. Setting your UID to 0 or something stupid like that, however, is ... just that, stupid.
 
  


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