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Old 06-05-2014, 09:28 AM   #1
dorsio
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Linux version


what Linux version is more appropriate to use for firmware editing and compiling, Ubuntu or Debian?
 
Old 06-05-2014, 10:27 AM   #2
AlucardZero
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whatever you are most familiar with
 
Old 06-05-2014, 11:23 AM   #3
mosam
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Recommended to choose ubuntu
 
Old 06-05-2014, 04:06 PM   #4
dorsio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlucardZero View Post
whatever you are most familiar with
I am new to Linux, which distribution is preferable to learn?
 
Old 06-05-2014, 04:48 PM   #5
snowpine
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Here is a nice comparison of the Top Ten:

http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major

I personally use and recommend Linux Mint (but you can't really go wrong with anything on that list).
 
Old 06-05-2014, 08:58 PM   #6
frankbell
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Any mainstream distro should do, but, with many, you may have to install development libraries after installing the OS. I recently ran into this with Mint--I had to go get glib.h in order to compile a little bit of software because the development parts of it were not included, thought the run-software parts were.

Slackware includes a sizable collection of developer tools at first boot.
 
Old 06-06-2014, 12:02 AM   #7
kooru
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If you're new to Linux, probably Ubuntu.
Mint is a good alternative too.
 
Old 06-07-2014, 12:18 PM   #8
erast
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I think that Ubuntu is more appropriate for such purposes.
 
Old 06-07-2014, 01:58 PM   #9
jamison20000e
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Hi. Debian. http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ml#post5090931
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...7/#post5184147
Best wishes and have fun.
 
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Old 06-07-2014, 04:08 PM   #10
dorsio
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What specific things in Debian may be harder to learn for beginners compare with Ubuntu?
 
Old 06-07-2014, 05:11 PM   #11
jamison20000e
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Not sure how to answer

as I think Ubuntu and\or Gnome + + tend to limit users making them harder to do whatever we want:

Debian won't tell you to do your up\dates\grades unless you make it and if you install Synaptic to get away from Apt or Aptitude it could seem overwhelming (tho it's not) compared to a "software center..." plus it depends on the .iso Debian has more options like a KDE installer or other or even a netinst so you can pick your own options like with Arch or Slackware.

I'd say the hardest thing is dealing with non-free drivers, many distros frown on hardware manufactures for not including Linux so they keep drivers in separate repositories?
https://wiki.debian.org/Firmware
https://www.debian.org/releases/stable/installmanual

Last edited by jamison20000e; 06-07-2014 at 05:13 PM.
 
Old 06-07-2014, 08:51 PM   #12
cascade9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorsio View Post
I am new to Linux, which distribution is preferable to learn?
Debian.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dorsio View Post
What specific things in Debian may be harder to learn for beginners compare with Ubuntu?
Nothing much.

Ubuntu holds your hand, with things like 'jockey', a tool for installing closed source hardawre drivers (e.g. closed nVidia or AMD/ATI GPU drivers). Debian doesnt have anything like that 'out of the box', but its got good documentation on how to do the same thing, and its easy to follow directions. Example for the debian closed source nVidia drivers guide-

https://wiki.debian.org/NvidiaGraphicsDrivers

Even following the documentation to do things like install closed source video drivers means you learn stuff about the system you dont need to learn with the ubuntu or ubuntu based like mint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamison20000e View Post
if you install Synaptic to get away from Apt or Aptitude it could seem overwhelming (tho it's not) compared to a "software center..."
Huh? Synaptic 'overwhelming'? I dont think thats what you wanted to say, but thats how it reads here. Synatpic is a different thign to apt/aptitiude, theyu are text based, Synaptic is a GUI. I dont use Synaptic that much, but is still a handy tool, if only for searching for software (yes, you can search from apt/aptitide, but its not anywhere near as easy. I find Synaptic makes more sense than Software Centre, another software search/install GUI. Oh yeah, Software Centre is installable on debian if someone wants anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamison20000e View Post
plus it depends on the .iso Debian has more options like a KDE installer or other or even a netinst so you can pick your own options like with Arch or Slackware.
The ubuntu family has a lubuntu (lxde) xubuntu (xfce) and kubuntu (KDE) and there is also the 'Minimal CD' which prety much acts like 'netinst' for debian. Debian doesnt have much as far as installers go that ubuntu doesnt....

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamison20000e View Post
'd say the hardest thing is dealing with non-free drivers, many distros frown on hardware manufactures for not including Linux so they keep drivers in separate repositories?
https://wiki.debian.org/Firmware
https://www.debian.org/releases/stable/installmanual
LOL, its because the drivers are closed source and 'non-free'. Distros like ubuntu have the drivers in different repos as well. For example, all the nVidia closed source drivers are in 'multiverse', 'universe' or 'restricted', not 'main'.

Quote:
The repository components are:

Main - Officially supported software.

Restricted - Supported software that is not available under a completely free license.

Universe - Community maintained software, i.e. not officially supported software.

Multiverse - Software that is not free.
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Repositories/Ubuntu

http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?ke...ty&section=all

The difference between distros like debian and ubuntu is that with debian you need to manually change the soruces.list to put in 'contrib' and 'non-free' to get the drivers. Ubutnu does all those changes in the background without telling you.

Another reason why you lean more with debain and the ubunbu and ubuntu based distros....

Last edited by cascade9; 06-07-2014 at 08:52 PM.
 
  


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