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Old 09-27-2017, 02:01 AM   #1
hd_scania
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Smile Best systems for Unix-like newbies?


I have been told very much, which Ubuntu is at dominant, then Linux Mint (LMDE), CentOS, FreeBSD are secondary, BEST to the Unix-like newbies, but why not rolling ones like TW (SuSE), Antergos (pacman), Manjaro (pacman) are better than LTS ones like Ubuntu, Mint, CentOS, FreeBSD? Is this dependent on how much stability a typical newbie needs?
 
Old 09-27-2017, 03:56 AM   #2
pan64
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obviously the best is my own one.
Otherwise this question has no any meaning without context: best for what? best to do what?....

I would suggest you to download and test live CDs without installing them and you will find which one is the best - for you.
www.distrowatch.com
 
Old 09-27-2017, 04:01 AM   #3
!!!
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Run everything in VirtualBox, several at once!!!
Slackware IF you want 3/4 of LQ to be your BestFriendsForever
Create your own distro (&submit it to DW)

Last edited by !!!; 09-27-2017 at 04:14 AM.
 
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Old 09-27-2017, 06:20 AM   #4
jsbjsb001
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You might want to have a look at PCLinuxOS.
 
Old 09-27-2017, 01:12 PM   #5
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LTS distros are very popular (and not just with newbies). One reason why LTS is popular, it gives the user a predictable and consistent work environment, for the next x number of years. The commands will stay the same, the interface won't change, hardware that is compatible now will continue to be compatible in the future, etc. An analogy would be, you sit down at your desk in the morning, you see a photo of your family, your favorite coffee mug, your pens and pencils are organized, the book you are reading is still open to the same page, etc.

Nothing wrong with rolling release (for experienced or beginner users) but it's important to remember that updates bring change. Maybe you sit down at your desk and your mug has mysteriously moved from the right side to the left side, or the photo of your family has been replaced by a photo of your cat, or the desk is 2 inches shorter than it was yesterday. Change can be disconcerting for some users.

Other users, of course, want to experience the latest in desks and desk accessories, and don't mind a bit of disruption to their work flow and environment. For this type of user, rolling release is ideal.

Last edited by snowday; 09-27-2017 at 01:26 PM.
 
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Old 09-27-2017, 01:25 PM   #6
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When picking a distribution a major choice may be "How much effort do I want to put into this?". If the answer is " none" then use Android, if "some" then Ubuntu or Mint, if "lots, and lots!" Then try LFS!
 
Old 09-27-2017, 04:41 PM   #7
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I agree that you should start with a free virtual machine. Then you can test out some of the top rated ones at www.distrowatch.com maybe.

Don't rely on what some web site said to use. Try it and see if you like it and can use it instead.
 
Old 09-27-2017, 11:09 PM   #8
hd_scania
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  1. PCLinuxOS is lacked of external and custom repo support, whose apt-rpm is aging and incompatible against regardless ZYpp, urpmi, dnf.
  2. It is also still lacked of LXQt, Hawaii, Lumina desktop shells, for ones which you are dissatisfied against Gtk+ (some compatibilities issues) and KDE (encouraging integration between Qt and Gtk+)
    1. Trinity desktop shell is an KDE derivative removing KF deps but unsure how lightweight it is.
    2. Budgie is now experimenting for LXQt but Budgie-Qt is not yet alpha.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
You might want to have a look at PCLinuxOS.
 
Old 09-27-2017, 11:27 PM   #9
hd_scania
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Smile

I think this is fatally dependent on what were your needs backing to the moment to which you were new come to Unix-like.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pan64 View Post
Otherwise this question has no any meaning without context: best for what? best to do what?....
I would suggest you to download and test live CDs without installing them and you will find which one is the best - for you.
www.distrowatch.com
 
Old 09-27-2017, 11:50 PM   #10
frankbell
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If you really want Unix-like, try FreeBSD.

Last edited by frankbell; 09-27-2017 at 11:55 PM.
 
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Old 10-01-2017, 11:35 AM   #11
fatmac
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BSD & Linux are similar, but not the same, they do things differently, both are based on unix principles.

If you are looking for a beginner distro, it will be big & loaded with programs, if you want something lightweight try AntiX, I've been using it for several years now, & whilst I also use a Devuan derivative called Vuu-Do Linux, I always advocate AntiX.
http://antix.mepis.org/index.php?title=Main_Page
 
Old 10-01-2017, 10:43 PM   #12
frankbell
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Quote:
Quote:
BSD & Linux are similar, but not the same, they do things differently, both are based on unix principles.
BSD is a Unix.

Linux was designed to comply with published Unix standards and is Unix-like, but it is not a Unix.

For all practical purposes, this is a distinction without a difference, but OP was interested in most Unix-like.

A true Unix is inherently most Unix-like.

Last edited by frankbell; 10-01-2017 at 10:58 PM.
 
  


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