LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 01-18-2014, 09:21 PM   #1
maxreason
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Location: phobos, mars
Distribution: 64-bit linux mint v20
Posts: 255

Rep: Reputation: 16
what is best distro to switch to from ubuntu?


I spend a lot of time programming on 64-bit ubuntu linux v12.04 but I don't really pay much attention to what's happening. Recently I realized we are only a couple months from another LTS release (v14.04) and looked into what will be different.

When I learned canonical went full evil and is now spyware by default, I immediately knew I had to switch distros. That's annoying because I've been working on ubuntu for years now, and hate to learn pointless new tricks.

So my question is, what will be the best distros for me to switch to, because I refuse to support canonical any longer.

I spend almost all my time programming in C and 64-bit assembly language with the codeblocks IDE, plus developing a firefox extension. One of my projects is a 3D simulation engine based upon OpenGL and xlib, which requires reasonably up-to-date nvidia drivers. I send and receive email via thunderbird, chat with linux skype, and contact other developers with xchat. That's pretty much how I spend my time on linux, 95% of which is writing code and debugging with the codeblocks IDE.

While I accomplish some things with a terminal window, mostly I work with GUI apps, so I'm not very good with the command line, system administration, or with configuring or customizing linux.

While I mostly liked ubuntu for the past several years, after nearly 2 years I still very much dislike unity. Plus I will not reward or support anyone on the dark side, which they most certainly are in my eyes. So I definitely need to move on, and will not consider remaining loyal to ubuntu any longer.

Given my purposes as stated above, what are the best distros?

Last edited by maxreason; 01-18-2014 at 10:12 PM.
 
Old 01-18-2014, 09:35 PM   #2
sag47
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Raleigh, NC
Distribution: Kubuntu x64, Raspbian, CentOS
Posts: 1,861
Blog Entries: 36

Rep: Reputation: 459Reputation: 459Reputation: 459Reputation: 459Reputation: 459
Might I recommend Kubuntu? It's got the same software repositories but KDE goodness. There's no ad-serving packages installed by default.
 
Old 01-18-2014, 10:05 PM   #3
maxreason
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Location: phobos, mars
Distribution: 64-bit linux mint v20
Posts: 255

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sag47 View Post
Might I recommend Kubuntu? It's got the same software repositories but KDE goodness. There's no ad-serving packages installed by default.
Thanks for the suggestion. Who produces that distro? I'm not sure how to formulate this question, but... I don't feel like I can trust canonical any more. So if they create kubuntu, why should I believe they didn't put something nefarious under the covers?

As an aside, I just reviewed the look of linux desktop environments on wikipedia, and tend to like GNOME the best, perhaps followed by cinnamon, Xfce, LXDE (I think). KDE doesn't look too bad. Though I can't experience the behavior or fundamental apps without running them.

PS: I just thought of another sickening thought. If some of the other distributions made by full-bore wonderful folks incorporate lots of packages from ubuntu, how do they know they aren't accidentally spreading canonical diseases?

Last edited by maxreason; 01-18-2014 at 10:23 PM.
 
Old 01-19-2014, 03:35 AM   #4
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys
Posts: 3,001

Rep: Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069
Hello,
My first response was try OpenSuse. You can see by my sig that I run Studio Ubuntu (KDE), OpenSuse and Slackware and while Studio Ubuntu v.13.04 surprised me with how much better it had gotten, I don't use it much. I'm much happier on Suse and happier still on Slackware. Since you are concerned with the learning curve of administration, I doubt Slackware is for you even though it is one of the top distros for compiling from source. You should find OpenSuse a nice middle choice, enough like Ubuntu to make you comfortable (and not lose "too much ground") but enough different to be substantially better, especially where it seems you want more control over what gets installed.

As for your last question, beyond wondering what specifically you saw that is so threatening and apparently non-removeable, there should be no worries about other distros. There is no need, and in most cases it's a bad idea, to try to install software from Ubuntu on anything but Ubuntu. Most popular distros have their own repositories, and a few still cater to building from source so that is totally under the operators control as to what gets installed and where.

Also you can try the Live environment on most distros to see if you like the basics before you ever commit to installing. BTW will these changes affect Mint as well?
 
Old 01-19-2014, 04:22 AM   #5
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 7,582

Rep: Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349
It depends how stable you want your OS to be. For up to date drivers and the like Debian Unstable or Debian Testing should be fine but there are times when an update will break packages. If you're careful though and only accept updates when they're proven you should be fine.
If you aren't too frightened by Canonical then Linux Mint is decent and reasonably up to date. There's a rolling release based upon Debian also which may be a little more likely to break on updates but has the advantage of not needing to update the distribution and canonical haven't touched it.
If you're willing to try other package management systems and ways of doing things then Fedora seem to be popular with developers. Of you could go to Slackware and choose the testing version to have the latest packages.
 
Old 01-19-2014, 04:46 AM   #6
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys
Posts: 3,001

Rep: Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069
@273 I'm curious as to why you would recommend Fedora at this time? It is my understanding that Fedora has become the testbed for ever more systemd, like bleeding edge, and is commonly broken. Is this not so? It would seem to me that someone like OP requires a solid framework to write code. Bleeding edge and rolling releases are more administrative intensive than I gathered he is interested in now, or learning for the future. I would think Debian Stable or Suse is more suited to OP.
 
Old 01-19-2014, 04:55 AM   #7
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 7,582

Rep: Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349Reputation: 2349
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
@273 I'm curious as to why you would recommend Fedora at this time? It is my understanding that Fedora has become the testbed for ever more systemd, like bleeding edge, and is commonly broken. Is this not so? It would seem to me that someone like OP requires a solid framework to write code. Bleeding edge and rolling releases are more administrative intensive than I gathered he is interested in now, or learning for the future. I would think Debian Stable or Suse is more suited to OP.
I mentioned it precisely because it is a test bed and some people want to "get in before everyone else". I would hope maxreason knows enough to google about a bit and decide upon stability over bleeding-edge.
If one runs, say, Debian Stable then to have anything like up-to-date NVIDIA drivers (for example) means adding extra repositories and apt-pinning or using the binary installer. Also with Debian Stable your libraries are going to be out of date and the situation will only get worse as time goes on.
It depends for whom you are developing, of course, but a nice solid, reliable system may be useless if you can't easily use more modern versions of libraries and drivers.
 
Old 01-19-2014, 10:36 AM   #8
Soderlund
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2012
Posts: 185

Rep: Reputation: 81
At least Debian would be very familiar to you since Ubuntu is based on it.

There's stable, testing and unstable. You can use stable with backports to selectively upgrade programs to newer versions than the ones in the stable repository. And if it's too old for you then just dist-upgrade to testing (which will be the next stable release).
 
Old 01-19-2014, 11:39 AM   #9
rokytnji
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: Waaaaay out West Texas
Distribution: AntiX 19
Posts: 6,166
Blog Entries: 21

Rep: Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089Reputation: 3089
I don't know. Maybe this will help or not.

http://tuxradar.com/content/distro-picker-0
 
Old 01-19-2014, 12:16 PM   #10
dugan
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: distro hopper
Posts: 9,753

Rep: Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406Reputation: 4406
Mint MATE edition. I'm surprised it wasn't the first one suggested.
 
Old 01-19-2014, 01:58 PM   #11
H,Gunn
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2014
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Arch. Sure there is a learning curve but it's a great and popular linux distro. Also, pclinuxos is a good alternative to ubuntu.
 
Old 01-19-2014, 08:54 PM   #12
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys
Posts: 3,001

Rep: Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069Reputation: 3069
Quote:
Originally Posted by H,Gunn View Post
Arch. Sure there is a learning curve but it's a great and popular linux distro. Also, pclinuxos is a good alternative to ubuntu.
I don't know whether some people think it is a popularity contest when someone asks "What distro should I use/try?" and feel compelled to chime in with their fave but it is useless at best and detrimental at worst.

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxreason-OP
While I accomplish some things with a terminal window, mostly I work with GUI apps, so I'm not very good with the command line, system administration, or with configuring or customizing linux.
Now seriously, is this the profile of someone likely to be happy with Arch? or someone who will badmouth it after 2 hours of pulling out his hair? Maybe if he had said "In the past I mostly have worked with GUI apps but I'd like to learn to go deeper" MAYBE then he might be a candidate. I agree that Arch is a very solid distro but it is by no means for the "turn the key and press the pedals" kind of "driver".

Last edited by enorbet; 01-19-2014 at 11:07 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-19-2014, 09:15 PM   #13
k3lt01
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Location: Australia
Distribution: Debian Wheezy, Jessie, Sid/Experimental, playing with LFS.
Posts: 2,900

Rep: Reputation: 637Reputation: 637Reputation: 637Reputation: 637Reputation: 637Reputation: 637
If you have been using Ubuntu for a fair length of time and are used to how Debian based systems work and don't want to have to learn new things just for the sake of it then I'd be moving to Debian because it is the backbone of so many other distros. I wouldn't move to Mint, even though they do support MATE, because they use Ubuntu and modify it.

So as I see it, this is my opinion, your best option is to either install Debian Wheezy and enable Backports so things like Iceweasel ar current or maybe install Debian testing (Jessie) and use it through its testing cycle and stay with it during its stable cycle (making sure to enable backports when it becomes stable. That will give you possibly 3-4 years of one distro.
 
Old 01-19-2014, 09:44 PM   #14
jamison20000e
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: ...uncanny valley... infinity\1975; (randomly born:) Milwaukee, WI, US( + travel,) Earth( I wish,) END BORDER$!◣◢┌∩┐ Fe26-E,e...
Distribution: any GPL that works well on my cheapest; has been KDE or CLI but open... http://goo.gl/NqgqJx &c ;-)
Posts: 4,002
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359Reputation: 1359
Hi. A lot of distros mentioned are built on Debian which can take more tweaking but IMHO is well worth it, after almost 20 years still my favorite and like most free to try. Best wishes and have fun.

Add: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...ml#post5090931
and "What is best distro to switch to from Ubuntu?" Most. :-)

Last edited by jamison20000e; 01-21-2014 at 10:42 PM. Reason: Add:
 
Old 01-19-2014, 10:05 PM   #15
H,Gunn
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2014
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
Now seriously, is this the profile of someone likely to be happy with Arch? or someone who will badmouth it after 2 hours of pulling out his hair? Maybe if he had said "In the past I mostly have worked with GUI apps but I'd like to learn to go deeper" MAYBE then he might be a candidate. I agree that Arch is a very solid distro but it is by no means for the "turn the key and press the pedals" kind of "driver".
Well, the reason I mentioned it is because the OP is a programmer. A person who can program a computer language certainly should be able to install OS like Arch. Besides, it was just a mere suggestion not a ultimatum.
 
  


Reply

Tags
c programming, codeblocks, distros, spyware, ubuntu


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to switch Distros when a Distro is already installed? moving2linux Linux - Newbie 10 04-08-2008 01:18 PM
Upgrade Kernel, distro, or switch distro? badmofo666 Linux - Newbie 9 12-20-2005 12:02 AM
What makes people switch distro? kaon General 21 01-26-2005 04:06 AM
Distro switch mykrob Linux - Software 1 09-29-2004 09:29 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:56 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration