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Old 01-31-2002, 10:31 AM   #1
Chijtska
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A good site to learn console commands


I am assuming I am calling the console by the correct name. ??

I am trying to learn as many commands as I can...however, I notice that almost no dos commands work at all... what is a good site to learn some basic linux commands? I have been searching the web and cant seem to find anything like that at all...

thanks for the help!
 
Old 01-31-2002, 10:40 AM   #2
inv|s|ble
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seeing as there are so many, and they can change depending on what all you selected to install, the best place to look is in /bin/ /sbin/ /usr/sbin/ /usr/bin/ and just sit back ls each dir, and then start man commandname and see what it does.
 
Old 01-31-2002, 10:44 AM   #3
Chijtska
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Not sure...

Did i understand correct: ls ? and man?

What is man for? I think i have figured out that ls is similar to dir in dos unless you meant something else...

What are the different main directories for? like /bin, /etc, and /root for instance?
 
Old 01-31-2002, 11:19 AM   #4
inv|s|ble
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ls means list, as in dir for dos/windows
man means manual, you will hear man pages a lot, meaning basically check the manual.
go here basic commands this is a list of the basic commands, along with there man pages for each, so you can get a general idea of what does what, and how to do it, before diving in with ls, and man.
 
Old 01-31-2002, 11:22 AM   #5
trickykid
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man stands for manual pages.. if you type man command name, it will show you the manual pages of that command..
/bin is where most commands are found
/etc is mainly for configuration files for your system
/root is your root home directory, like /home for regular users.

Do a search on "man pages" and it will bring up many sites that have links to pages containing commands and man pages for them.
 
Old 01-31-2002, 11:33 AM   #6
TacKat
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The directory tree goes something like this:

/ - this is the "root" directory. It's the highest directory level
/bin - Holds important system binaries: ls, cp, mount, etc
/boot - contains files that are used to boot
/dev - contains all the devices that allows communication to the hardware
/etc - contains system configuration files
/home - contains the users' home directories
/lib - has various important system libraries
/mnt - holds the mount points of various drives and paritions (ie /mnt/floppy is like a: in dos)
/opt - I have no idea. Must not be too important
/proc - Holds information from the kernel about the system
/root - This is root's (the superuser) home directory
/sbin - Holds important system binaries that should only be used by root: checking filesystems, shutting down, etc
/tmp - Temporary storage space
/usr - Has a structure much like / but is for user level programs
/var - contains system logs, mail, printer spools, and so on
 
Old 01-31-2002, 11:52 AM   #7
trickykid
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Quote:
Originally posted by TacKat

/opt - I have no idea. Must not be too important
its usually a place where you can install programs.. I think it stands for optional... but most place programs elsewhere...
 
Old 01-31-2002, 12:22 PM   #8
finegan
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Quote:
Originally posted by TacKat
The directory tree goes something like this:
That was nifty,

Chijtska,

You might want to pick up O'Reilly's Linux in a Nutshell. Between that book and the man pages, I really have never needed another reference for anything command line oriented.

Cheers,

Finegan
 
Old 01-31-2002, 02:29 PM   #9
Chijtska
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Found a decent book...

At CompUSA I found a good book that was very cheap... One of those learn linux in 24 hr type deals...

1 question tho....

how do you remove a directory when that directory has a number of files and/or directories in them? i have tried rm, rd, and rmdir but none of those will work....

thanks for the help
 
Old 01-31-2002, 02:35 PM   #10
TacKat
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"rm -r"

The r stands for recursive. Check the man page on rm for other options. If you don't want to be asked about removing every file, use "rm -rf" but BE VERY CAREFUL, especially if you are doing that as root. One typo could wipe your whole filesystem.
 
Old 01-31-2002, 02:38 PM   #11
Chijtska
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Hope this doesnt snd too stupid...

Youdidnt just mean: rm -rf /root doing this as root and it would wipe out your entire system????!!!! man, thats a scary thought...
 
Old 01-31-2002, 03:00 PM   #12
trickykid
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yeah.. if you accidently typed rm -r / somedirectory, that would wipe out your / directory in which everything is under. notice the space after / and somedirectory... that is why you would want to be careful... and it should look like this rm -r /somedirectory if you wanted to just delete somedirectory.

Last edited by trickykid; 01-31-2002 at 03:01 PM.
 
Old 02-01-2002, 01:55 AM   #13
DavidPhillips
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if you are talking about commands then

open konq and type man:/ in the location bar
 
Old 02-01-2002, 07:15 AM   #14
Chijtska
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konq?

I typed konq... but got: no such command ?????

anyways...

I am looking for a command to find certain commands and programs...how do i do that in the console?
 
Old 02-01-2002, 09:15 AM   #15
jeremy
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The ability to lookup linux commands and definitions will be added to this site soon.

--jeremy
 
  


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