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Old 04-20-2004, 02:30 AM   #1
kumpon
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Registered: Apr 2004
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Question Need Help Plzzzz.


Dear...All Expert
I'm a window user.Now I really need to know about Linux.I have never known about it untill last two week.My company use Linux(debian).I try to play and learn from it, but I have no idea.I have no idea which way I should go to have a good understanding about debian.Pleas give me an advice about what should I start or which infomation I should know and learn first.Or anything that can help me understand debian.
Thank you for all of your help
 
Old 04-20-2004, 02:53 AM   #2
ToniT
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Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Zurich, Switzerland
Distribution: Debian/unstable
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Well.. maybe the best way to learn using is it by using it.

When you figure out that you don't know how to do certain things, then it is good to google around and search for the forums if others have already asked the same thing. If not, then go ahead and ask for help. Also having some linux guru around is not bad either.
 
Old 04-20-2004, 03:49 AM   #3
Dead Parrot
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Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Debian GNU/kFreeBSD
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There's a lot to learn when you come from Windows to a Unix-like system, such as Debian GNU/Linux. You'll need to read lots of documentation, but luckily you can pretty soon apply what you've learned in practice. If you're asking for recommendations about what documentation you should read, here's my list:

1. The single most useful document I've found for learning the basics of Debian is Debian Reference:

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/re...erence.en.html

2. For general info about the Linux basics, Rute is my favourite:

http://www.icon.co.za/~psheer/rute-home.html

3. Also you'll need to learn to use man pages to dig info about specific commands. You'll find the online version of Debian manual pages here:

http://linux.neuralmatrix.org/dwww/man/

And, of course, in linuxquestions.org you'll meet Debian users (newbies mostly, but some gurus too) who will always try their best to help you.
 
Old 04-20-2004, 04:29 AM   #4
Qucho
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Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Colorado, US
Distribution: Debian "Sarge"
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to get help in the command line (konsol, xterm) can type any of this:

~$ man <the-command-I-want-info-about>
~$ info <the-command-I-want-info-about> | less
the '| less' part is optional but will allowe you to scroll up and down.
or..
~$ <the-command-I-want-info-about> --help | less
and..
~$ help | less
Will give you a list of basic commands,

The simbols '~$' means the command line as regular user (as the 'C:\' in wondows)
If you see the simbols '~#' means the command line as root (root is the 'super user' or 'administrator')

There is no real meaning to extensions. All files are the same to the system, they are just files. (what makes them different is the permitions/setting of the file)

Storage devices (HD's, floppys, CD's) are mounted as folders.
so if you insert a floppy you need to do...
~$ mount /floppy
then to browse it just move to that directory...
~$ cd /floppy
~$ dir
If you can't mount floppys is because you have no permision by the admin (root)
to copy a file to a floppy...
~$ cp myfile /floppy

now... go explore !!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Old 04-21-2004, 01:58 PM   #5
comp12345
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Registered: Feb 2004
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One tip. If you are using bash(default for users, so most likely you are), you can have the bash shell autocomplete whatever you type by pressing tab.

Ex. Let say you want to list the properties of a file named real_long_filename

You could just type ls -l real<tab> and the bash shell will fill in the rest of the filename. If there is more than one possible match(i.e. you also have real_long_filename2), then type ls -l real<tab><tab> and the bash shell will show a list of all possible matches. This also works with commands. Just to avoid any confusion, the <tab> means to press the tab key.
 
Old 04-21-2004, 02:41 PM   #6
sylvain_gnu
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Registered: Mar 2004
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Hi Kumpon,

These are good suggestions already.

This seems to me an important topic as well:
- Do you have a computer at home?

If yes, then I suggest you install your own GNU/Linux system on it, using a Debian distribution for instance. Maybe keep a Knoppix live CD at hand, it might help you.
GNU/Linux is a system that is in constant evolution, so be prepared to make several installations.

Using GNU/Linux at home is the best way to learn.

Have fun!
Sylvain.
 
  


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