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Old 07-01-2011, 09:03 PM   #1
Randicus Draco Albus
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Installed Slackware successfully, but password is not recognised.


I had a problem when I tried to install Slackware. I am not new to Linux, but my experience has been with simple distibutions like Debian and Ubuntu. So please bear with me.
I installed using the DVD. I was able to stumble through the partitioning. Although I was totally lost, my machine already had a Linux system, so for the most part I left the partitions alone.
With other distibutions, one enters a name and password while setting up the network and then enters a user name and password. My Slackware only asked for name and password while setting up the network. After installation was complete, I re-booted the and ran into a problem. The log-in name was the name I entered during network configuration, but my password was not recognised.
My first impulse is to believe I missed something during installation, but I do not see how that is possible. The installation process goes step-by-step, and other than partitioning that is too complex for someone like myself with very low computer competency, the installation process is straight-forward.
Any ideas about what I did wrong? I am eager to give Slackware a try.
 
Old 07-01-2011, 09:28 PM   #2
frankbell
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As I recall, Slackware asks you to set up a password for root during install, but doesn't ask you to create a non-root user. It leaves it to you to create a user after you reboot and log in for the first time.

You might try booting to the DVD, entering the setup menu, and skipping ahead to the "Setup Your New System" menu choice (it's last or next to last in the menu list).
 
Old 07-02-2011, 08:51 AM   #3
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
As I recall, Slackware asks you to set up a password for root during install, but doesn't ask you to create a non-root user. It leaves it to you to create a user after you reboot and log in for the first time.
The problem was that the password I entered during installation was not recogised after re-booting, so I could not log in for the first time.
As for "You might try booting to the DVD, entering the setup menu, and skipping ahead to the "Setup Your New System" menu choice...", I assume you mean after installation, re-boot with the DVD still in the machine and skip ahead. I might try that in a few days. I shall up-date this post with the result.
 
Old 07-02-2011, 09:42 AM   #4
harryhaller
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Slackware installation does NOT ask you for a user name and password. It only asks for a root password which you should enter twice.

I can only imagine that you misunderstood part of the set up.

Sign on as root. Then run adduser to create a new user and password.
 
Old 07-02-2011, 07:49 PM   #5
Randicus Draco Albus
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Yes, I did misunderstand something. The installation procedure that is different from other distributions confused me. I was making mistakes when trying to log in. I installed the system again and there was no problem. With that issue.
I installed from the DVD, and to be safe and easy, I installed the entire system. However, all I could do was log into the terminal. It appeared that more work is needed. Fine. I printed the installation quide beforehand, so I tried a few lines from that, but that simply brought up menus from the DVD installation.
Since I followed every step in the installation procedure and installed a complete operating system, it should be ready for at least basic use. If the "installed" system needs to be configured from the terminal, I am S.O.L., since I am not a power user. If getting to the KDE interface is something very simple for people who know their way around the terminal, it is not obvious to those of us who don't.
To be honest, it is beyond my comprehension. The installation procedure is easy. Almost as easy as distibutions like Debian, Fedora, Mandriva, etc. But unlike the others, Slackware boots into the terminal, instead of a user interface. During installation I was thinking, "Why does Slackware have such a bad repution for being user unfriendly?" I am curious to see Slackware, so I might do a little more research and try again in the future. But since I am not a computer programmer, my experiment with Slackware was probably short-lived.

Thanks anyway. And I hope my choice of words does not sound angry.
 
Old 07-02-2011, 07:56 PM   #6
TobiSGD
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Slackware by default doesn't boot into the graphical mode. You can change that in the file /etc/inittab, change the line
Code:
id:3:initdefault:
to
Code:
id:4:initdefault:
Now Slackware will boot to the GUI.

Alternatively you can just start the GUI with the command
Code:
startx
after logging in.

By the way, I wouldn't consider Slackware to be user-unfriendly, it is just not a 'hold-your-hands'-distribution.
 
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Old 07-03-2011, 09:01 AM   #7
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post

By the way, I wouldn't consider Slackware to be user-unfriendly, it is just not a 'hold-your-hands'-distribution.
Agreed. Slackware is a logical, elegant operating system designed for people who can read and understand support documentation. A newcomer to Slackware will ensure a successful first install by checking out the available support materials. The slackbook is a good starting point.
 
Old 07-05-2011, 03:17 AM   #8
Randicus Draco Albus
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I am not trying to start an argument, only express an opinion. So do not regard the following as aggressive. I only want to fully explain my opinion, not denigrate Slackware or the people who use it. I have respect for Slackware users, because of the intelligent intercourse in the forum.

Booting into a graphical interface is not "hand-holding." And I have down-loaded the Slackbook, but have not read that tome yet. I plan to read it, because I want to learn how to use the terminal a little. However, I disagree that needing to read a terminal user guide in order to use the graphical interface is logical.
TobiSGD's command lines look helpful, but they re-inforce my opinion. That being, knowing a series of command lines should not be necessary to use the interface. Especially considering, apart from partitioning which requires a little knowledge, Slackware's DVD installation process could not be any easier. Again, this is only my opinion, but I find it illogical to have such an easy installation process followed by the need to initialise it with command lines. That suggests the developers are not sure if they want to target the O.S to everyone or only to computer programmers. (I exaggerate to illustrate a point. It is not meant to be taken literally.) No offence intended, but since most Slackware users are much more knowledgeable about computer software than everyone else, some of them do not realise what seems easy or logical to them is above the heads of most people. Most of us need things to be simple, not idiot-proof or hand-holding, but relatively simple.

I still have nothing against Slackware and shall probably try again in the future. Perhaps after more research. But my Debian system is working just fine, so I shall stick with it for the time being.
 
Old 07-05-2011, 05:18 AM   #9
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus View Post
I still have nothing against Slackware and shall probably try again in the future. Perhaps after more research. But my Debian system is working just fine, so I shall stick with it for the time being.
Absolutely. Enjoy Debian; that is an excellent operating system. Yes. If you choose to try Slackware in the future you will ensure a successful install by making yourself familiar with the process. As I mentioned the book will ensure success.
You can easily configure Slackware to boot-up with a graphical log-in screen by editing a text file. Edit /etc/inittab:

Code:
# nano /etc/inittab
Change

Code:
id:3:initdefault:
To

Code:
id:4:initdefault:
 
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Old 07-05-2011, 05:31 AM   #10
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus View Post
And I have down-loaded the Slackbook, but have not read that tome yet. I plan to read it, because I want to learn how to use the terminal a little. However, I disagree that needing to read a terminal user guide in order to use the graphical interface is logical.
The Slackbook is not only a guide to the command-line, it also tells you how to configure your system. Since Slackware is mainly configured with the commandline it seems to me much more logical to read the book first.

Quote:
No offence intended, but since most Slackware users are much more knowledgeable about computer software than everyone else, some of them do not realise what seems easy or logical to them is above the heads of most people. Most of us need things to be simple, not idiot-proof or hand-holding, but relatively simple.
No offense taken. Exactly that is the reason why Slackware is only recommended to newbies/"normal users" when they have the intention to learn Linux in the way of using their system. There are other distributions that fit the needs of people that want their systems to be ready to work out of the box.

Quote:
I find it illogical to have such an easy installation process followed by the need to initialise it with command lines. That suggests the developers are not sure if they want to target the O.S to everyone or only to computer programmers.
May I ask why you think that programmers that have no need to start in the GUI don't deserve an easy to use installer?

Quote:
I still have nothing against Slackware and shall probably try again in the future. Perhaps after more research. But my Debian system is working just fine, so I shall stick with it for the time being.
Nothing wrong with that. If you feel more comfortable with Debian, use it. i used it for a year or two and it is a great system. That's what Linux is all about, choose what you want to use and what is comfortable for you.
 
Old 07-07-2011, 12:56 AM   #11
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
May I ask why you think that programmers that have no need to start in the GUI don't deserve an easy to use installer?
It is not a matter of deserve. It is simply easier for programmers to set up a desired boot-up method using the terminal during the first log-in, than it is for novices to configure a system. Especially if they are not familiar with a system new to them.
 
  


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