LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 10-13-2004, 05:54 PM   #1
necbrownie
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Cambridge, Massachusets, USA
Distribution: Slackware 10.0 Suse 9.2
Posts: 47

Rep: Reputation: 15
Windows files copied to my linux partition are locked when logged in as a normal user


I have a dual boot system with windows xp on my master hard drive and slackware 10.0 kde 3.2.3 on my slave hard drive. I edited my fstab so that I could access my windows partition when logged in as a normal user. I can now access my windows drive when logged in as a normal user.

However, I cannot use any files that I copy from my windows drive to my linux drive when logged in as a normal user. The icons have a padlock symbol over them. When I log in as a root I have no problem doing this.

How can I fix permissions so that files moved from my windows xp ntfs partition to my linux partition work when I am logged in as a normal user???
 
Old 10-13-2004, 06:02 PM   #2
mipia
Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: lake michigan
Distribution: Debian, Mint, Slackware
Posts: 457

Rep: Reputation: 35
read up on chmod
 
Old 10-13-2004, 06:22 PM   #3
mikieboy
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Warrington, Cheshire, UK
Distribution: Linux Mint 12 LXDE
Posts: 555

Rep: Reputation: 33
You edited your /etc/fstab inserting umask = 277 in the Windows line, is that right?

Mine reads umask = 000 and all users have full read/write permissions

Good luck
 
Old 10-14-2004, 12:10 AM   #4
jschiwal
Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2001
Location: Fargo, ND
Distribution: SuSE AMD64
Posts: 15,733

Rep: Reputation: 655Reputation: 655Reputation: 655Reputation: 655Reputation: 655Reputation: 655
Another option to consider using is uid=.

Use either your user id number, or your login name. This way you become the owner of the xp partition. If someone else is logged in and you have the permissions set for owner only access, then you have exclusive access (except for root).

The ntfs file system is currently read only, so chmod doesn't work. Instead use the options fmask= and dmask=. The fmask is for setting the permissions for the files on the ntfs partition. The dmask is for setting the directory permissions. So suppose you user name is 'johnd'.

You could have the options
uid=johnd,fmask=0177,dmask=0077

Last edited by jschiwal; 10-14-2004 at 01:13 AM.
 
Old 10-14-2004, 07:51 AM   #5
necbrownie
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Cambridge, Massachusets, USA
Distribution: Slackware 10.0 Suse 9.2
Posts: 47

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thx guys, umask=000 seems to work.

Can anyone tell me what these numbers mean or point me in the direction of some documentation where I can find this out?

Thanks again
 
Old 10-14-2004, 04:27 PM   #6
mikieboy
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Warrington, Cheshire, UK
Distribution: Linux Mint 12 LXDE
Posts: 555

Rep: Reputation: 33
I have found the following links. You might find what you want here.

http://www.linuxsecurity.com/tips/tip-1.html

http://www.faqs.org/docs/linux_intro/sect_03_04.html

I haven't found anything else of much use.

Mikie
 
Old 10-14-2004, 05:03 PM   #7
aeNeo
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0
Posts: 57

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally posted by necbrownie
Thx guys, umask=000 seems to work.

Can anyone tell me what these numbers mean or point me in the direction of some documentation where I can find this out?

Thanks again
They're binary numbers. For instance chmod 777 <file> is equal to rwx-rwx-rwx(421-421-421), where the first group of numbers is for root, second is for users, third is for the whole world. If you wanted root to have full rights, users to have read & execute, and the world to have read-only access, use chmod 754 <file> (rwx--r-x--r--(421-401-400)).

Hope that helps =)
 
Old 10-14-2004, 05:20 PM   #8
mikieboy
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Warrington, Cheshire, UK
Distribution: Linux Mint 12 LXDE
Posts: 555

Rep: Reputation: 33
Thanks aeNeo.

I'm still a bit confused by what umask is supposed to do. Take a look at this extract from the second link that I posted above: -

"The umask value is subtracted from these default permissions after the function has created the new file or directory. Thus, a directory will have permissions of 775 by default, a file 664, if the mask value is (0)002."

What I'm asking is, If chmod sets file permissions, then why umask?
 
Old 10-15-2004, 09:11 AM   #9
necbrownie
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Cambridge, Massachusets, USA
Distribution: Slackware 10.0 Suse 9.2
Posts: 47

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thx guys, that was very useful
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Debian normal user cant mount windows shared partition silverstormboy Debian 3 01-14-2005 08:25 AM
Access my windows partition as a normal user necbrownie Slackware 5 10-13-2004 05:22 PM
WinXP can't read linux files copied to FAT32 partition gdh Linux - General 1 08-07-2004 11:31 AM
FSTAB entry for normal user to access windows partition rmanocha Linux - Software 4 01-29-2004 05:33 PM
copying files from linux to windows partition as user aiims1777 Linux - General 15 11-15-2003 02:56 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:29 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration