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Old 11-02-2012, 11:40 AM   #1
Sli
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Slackware partition scheme


Hello everyone,

I would like to install Slackware and want to confirm that the following partition scheme looks appropriate.

I have 118 GB to spare:

Swap (4 GB) ---> I am considering not creating a swap partition (I have 6 GB of RAM - don't think it is necessary)
/boot (200 MB)
/ (25 GB)
/home (rest)
/usr (10 GB)
/var (10 GB)
/tmp (5GB)

Is this alright for a regular desktop environment with no special requirements - please feel free to suggest any changes. Thank you in advance.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 11:47 AM   #2
TobiSGD
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On a normal desktop environment there is no need for having separate /usr, /tmp and /var, IMHO. A separate /boot is also not needed, except you want to use LVM or RAID for your /-partition.
Regarding swap, if you plan to use hibernate it should be at least as large as your physical RAM, otherwise I would give 1GB.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 11:55 AM   #3
Sli
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So would you recommend something like:

Swap: 6 GB (to allow possibility for hibernate)
Root: 30 GB
Home: 82 GB

Thank you for your assistance.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 11:57 AM   #4
TobiSGD
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That seems reasonable, this allows enough space for installing a bunch of programs and having still enough space in /tmp.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:07 PM   #5
Sli
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Do you not think it would be appropriate to make a separate /usr partition?

Excerpt from the Slackware website (http://slackware.com/install/partitions.php)

"It is also a good idea to make seperate partitions for /, /home, and /usr. ... There are many good reasons to breaking it up into /, /home, and /usr. For example: ... /usr is where software goes, so you can keep that whenever you upgrade distributions. ..."
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:08 PM   #6
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I think you're being a little over generous with the allocations.

I have 4GB ram, This is what I do (more or less):
/ 16GB
/var 16GB *
/tmp (in ram on tmpfs)
/home as big as needed.
no-swap

* 16GB /var so that you have plenty of space available for /var/tmp (for things that won't fit on the in RAM /tmp)

P.S.
I don't bother with a separate /usr any more. Ask yourself why you would want it to be separate, if you don't have a good answer, don't bother.

Last edited by GazL; 11-02-2012 at 12:09 PM.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:13 PM   #7
Sli
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So would this be an appropriate way to allocate 116 GB? (Like TobiSGD mentioned, I don't think I need to make it more complicated than it needs to be for my very modest needs in a normal desktop environment).

/ 25 GB
/var 16GB
/tmp (how big should this be? 5GB?)
/home (rest - ~70GB)
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:16 PM   #8
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/: 50 GB
swap: 25 GB
/usr/src: 100 GB
/home: the rest
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:29 PM   #9
jtsn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sli View Post
/ (25 GB)
Too much, 2-8 G is enough.
Quote:
/usr (10 GB)
Way to small, for a regular Slackware install you should allocate a minimum of 24 GB for /usr.

Quote:
/tmp (5GB)
Use a tmpfs for that.

Quote:
Is this alright for a regular desktop environment with no special requirements - please feel free to suggest any changes.
On a rotating disk place /var behind / and before /usr.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD
On a normal desktop environment there is no need for having separate /usr, /tmp and /var
Seriously, on a normal desktop environment there is no need for /. C:\ is enough. ;-)
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:31 PM   #10
GazL
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As I said above, I have specific reasons for making /var that big. Don't just copy my values without thinking it through.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:37 PM   #11
basil_brush
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@GAZL ...How much RAM would you need/recommend before running /tmp in RAM?
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:41 PM   #12
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtsn View Post
Seriously, on a normal desktop environment there is no need for /. C:\ is enough. ;-)
Posting in the wrong forum? Only one of my machines has a C:\ partition (although I prefer to tell it /dev/sda1, since in Windows drive letters are neither related to the disk they are on nor to the position they are on that disk).

Quote:
Originally Posted by guanx View Post
/: 50 GB
swap: 25 GB
/usr/src: 100 GB
/home: the rest
You are right, allocating 175GB to the system and putting the rest to /home is the right way to do on a disk with 116GB space. Would you now like to elaborate why you think that would be reasonable on a desktop system?
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:50 PM   #13
Sli
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Hmmm - a lot of contradicting opinions. I understand there is no "correct answer" and that it will largely depend on the individual needs of a user. Like I said though, I am only looking for what most would consider a normal partition scheme for regular desktop use. I don't have too much Linux experience, which is why I am not sure about some of the more technical aspects of space allocation. When people provide suggestions, could you please assume that I won't need any special scheme.

Based on the previous suggestions, I am now looking at something like this:

/ (15 GB)
/var (10 GB)
/usr (25 GB)
/tmp (I don't quite understand here if I use a temporary file system [tmpfs], if I still need to allocate space during the installation or if it will use my RAM?)
/home (rest ~66 GB)

Thanks for your help.

Last edited by Sli; 11-02-2012 at 12:52 PM.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:56 PM   #14
bimboleum
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Hey,
My 2 cents worth ....

With one hard-drive, I partition:-

partition 1 /boot .... 100 M (or more depending on your mood!)
partition 2 / ........ 16G with Slackware14
partition 3 swap = 2xram
partition 4 everything else

Then I make partition 4 a volume group and use LVM to create whatever
size logical volumes that I need. This way I can expand the volumes as needed.

I use ext3 for all my filesystems, and expanding the logical volume can handle expanding this filesystem type also.

This makes for a very flexible setup.

As it happens, my Thinkpad W530 has a relatively small (32G) msata SSD ... just show how things have changed over the last few years when 32G is considered small!) as well as a 500G spinning hard-drive.

I have partitoned the SSD into 2 equal 15+G partitions onto which I install the base OS (2 partitions gives me a non-destructive upgrade path).
My main spinning hard-drive contains my swap partition and the remainder which I use as a volume group. I have separate logical volumes for /usr/local, /home, /tmp and /var which means my SSD drive is pretty much read-only during normal operations.

As usual YMMV :-)

cheers
pete

pete hilton
saruman@ruvolo-hilton.org
Running Slackware since 1995
 
Old 11-02-2012, 12:58 PM   #15
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sli View Post
Hmmm - a lot of contradicting opinions. I understand there is no "correct answer" and that it will largely depend on the individual needs of a user. Like I said though, I am only looking for what most would consider a normal partition scheme for regular desktop use. I don't have too much Linux experience, which is why I am not sure about some of the more technical aspects of space allocation. When people provide suggestions, could you please assume that I won't need any special scheme.

Based on the previous suggestions, I am now looking at something like this:

/ (15 GB)
/var (10 GB)
/usr (25 GB)
/tmp (I don't quite understand here if I use a temporary file system [tmpfs], if I still need to allocate space during the installation or if it will use my RAM?)
/home (rest ~66 GB)

Thanks for your help.
Yes, tmpfs will use your RAM instead of disk space. By the way, if you have a separate /usr, /var and /tmp (for what reason ever, I still think at least splitting out /usr and /var does not really make sense on a desktop machine) you won't need a 15GB /-partition.
Oh, and keep in mind that there will be no hibernation without swap partition, just in case you want to use it.
 
  


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