LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 04-18-2014, 06:30 AM   #1
linuxtinker
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2013
Location: NJ / USA
Distribution: Slackware 64 -Current
Posts: 57

Rep: Reputation: 6
Recording a terminal Session


I am new to Slackware this year and want to start sharing my experiences setting up slackware. I usually solve my own problems by reading your wonderful posts here. Unfortunately by the time I am done altering config files and entering cli commands I don't remember all the steps I did to fix the problem. I was wondering is there an easy way to record my terminal sessions. I have read about using script but it says it wont work if I use VIM. Is there a way I can record the terminal that will also record the changes I make in vim as well, or maybe use another cli editor that script can record?


Thanks




BTW: I have to say besides slackware being a great distro this community has mad my transition to slack a great experience.
 
Old 04-18-2014, 06:50 AM   #2
rtmistler
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: Milford, MA. USA
Distribution: MontaVista, Ubuntu, MINT
Posts: 1,013
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 447Reputation: 447Reputation: 447Reputation: 447Reputation: 447
Someone else may offer a suggestion more automated. Every time I've thought that this was what I wanted, it turned out that it was more difficulty to me versus using the two methods I am going to suggest. First, the history(3) command will print out your most recent commands up to a certain limit and I believe you can play with a property to see more than the default. The default is pretty large though. The second suggestion is to realize that you're doing stuff which you'll want to remember and repeat; so keep a log via other means.

What I do is I keep open a document, or a draft email and cut/paste my progress in there. Also this is more useful to me because there are things which aren't commands entered which you will want to retain. For instance if there is a setup file which I need to edit and add some lines, and say I did a vi session of a file. The fact that I did the vi shows in my history, however the changes I made will not; so I copy/paste the relevant file chunks into the log that I keep. Furthermore, if I searched the web for a solution and found a great resource, I copy that hyperlink into my log.

I actually do this a lot because I configure and bring up many prototype boards, build a bootloader and kernel for them and have to configure the kernel and bootloader for our intended applications. As a result it's days of experimentation and customization, a lot of the work may be failed experimentation where I will not care to retain my failed efforts, but the really difficult to attain issues definitely require me to keep a detailed log of actions, attempts, and results so that I can repeat and devise better methods for the next iteration.

So, to me it's more than just an organized history of command I've entered, it's instead the extra information which came from that whole picture.

Last edited by rtmistler; 04-18-2014 at 06:53 AM.
 
Old 04-18-2014, 08:22 AM   #3
Habitual
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Distribution: Slack14_64_Multilib
Posts: 3,072
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741
http://showterm.io/
 
Old 04-18-2014, 08:43 AM   #4
BenCollver
Rogue Class
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: OR, USA
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 156

Rep: Reputation: 50
http://slackbuilds.org/repository/14...cordmydesktop/
 
Old 04-18-2014, 10:26 AM   #5
TracyTiger
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2011
Location: California, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 253

Rep: Reputation: 59
Me Too

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
The second suggestion is to realize that you're doing stuff which you'll want to remember and repeat; so keep a log via other means.
The points made in that post are excellent. Just to let you know that rtmistler isn't alone. I've also found that "...keep a log via other means." has worked best for me.

I simply keep a written log, similar to a laboratory notebook which I record the sequential steps of my "experiment" and add notes and references such as WHY something worked or didn't work. When I occasionally have a success I separately summarize the steps to that success.

This out-of-band method could be done by typing into a second computer rather than handwritten for those, like the OP, who want to share their activities.

In some environments the logging computer can be connected to the target computer as a console to facilitate copy/paste functions. I mention this because much of the time the issue involved is the boot sequence when the target machine has limited resources available for recording/typing/editing. But I imagine it's rare to find an environment these days where one can connect a logging console up via the serial port. (showing my age)

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
So, to me it's more than just an organized history of command I've entered, it's instead the extra information which came from that whole picture.
I found another advantage to "writing/typing" rather than simply "recording" is similar to why one designs a program rather than to just start coding. The process encourages one to think about the process rather than just trial-and-error.
 
Old 04-18-2014, 12:50 PM   #6
ruario
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Location: Oslo, Norway
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,806

Rep: Reputation: 810Reputation: 810Reputation: 810Reputation: 810Reputation: 810Reputation: 810Reputation: 810
http://shelr.tv/ works pretty well
 
Old 04-18-2014, 04:13 PM   #7
Habitual
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Distribution: Slack14_64_Multilib
Posts: 3,072
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741Reputation: 741
Terminator does "logging" very well.
 
Old 04-18-2014, 04:15 PM   #8
justwantin
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Distribution: Slackware, Slackware ARM, Salix and Porteus
Posts: 551

Rep: Reputation: 43
I also keep text file notes, have been doing that for a long time, and keep them all in one directory in my /home/~. I also make up one liner scripts for very long commands that I will use again and keep them in /usr/local/bin. That way I can refer to them or use them using just a one word command in a terminal.
 
Old 04-18-2014, 06:41 PM   #9
Richard Cranium
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2009
Location: Carrollton, Texas
Distribution: Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 1,435

Rep: Reputation: 407Reputation: 407Reputation: 407Reputation: 407Reputation: 407
The following advice reminds me of a joke, but here goes...

Never do anything that cannot be accomplished by a shell script. (Or perl script or python script or ruby script or awk script....)

Instead of doing the thing directly, you write the script that does the action. Save the script. There's your record.

Oh yeah, it's this joke:
Quote:
There was a pilot coming into the Seattle airport through thick fog when his instruments went out.
He was circling around and he saw a tall building with a guy working alone on the top floor. He cut the engine and rolled down the window and yelled, "Hey where am I?"
The man said, "You're in an airplane." The pilot made a 275 degree turn and brought the plane in for a perfect landing on the runway 5 miles away just as the fuel has run out. The passengers were amazed and asked how he did it.
The pilot said, "It was easy. I asked the guy in that building a simple question. The answer he gave me was 100 percent correct an absolutely useless, therefore, that must be Microsoft's support office and from there the airport is five miles due East."
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-19-2014, 12:41 AM   #10
enorbet
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware 14 is Main OpSys on Main PC, 2ndary are OpenSuSe 13 and SolydK
Posts: 674

Rep: Reputation: 268Reputation: 268Reputation: 268
Hello
This may do more than what you're asking but it is very cool and worth a look -

https://asciinema.org/
 
Old 04-19-2014, 09:06 AM   #11
linuxtinker
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2013
Location: NJ / USA
Distribution: Slackware 64 -Current
Posts: 57

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 6
Thanks for all the replies guys....(like the joke Richard)
Ill probably end up using more then one of the solutions suggested, depending on what I am setting up at the time. Ill mark the link as solved, but if anyone else would like to share, please do..

Last edited by linuxtinker; 04-19-2014 at 09:39 AM.
 
Old 05-06-2014, 08:04 AM   #12
rtmistler
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: Milford, MA. USA
Distribution: MontaVista, Ubuntu, MINT
Posts: 1,013
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 447Reputation: 447Reputation: 447Reputation: 447Reputation: 447
Here's a full solution just posted today by onebuck http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...09#post5165609
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-06-2014, 03:49 PM   #13
NeoMetal
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: MD
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 101

Rep: Reputation: 17
Edit: Sorry, didn't read op fully
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
make commands keep running after leaving a terminal session or ssh session Danny3031 Programming 18 01-30-2012 11:29 AM
Mkisofs/cdrecord: recording a second session. stf92 Linux - General 1 11-24-2010 02:39 AM
Session Recording Software Beanz239 Linux - Software 1 02-22-2009 06:18 PM
Switching back to the Mandrake 9.1 desktop from terminal rdesktop terminal session marc218 Linux - General 6 02-08-2007 02:45 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:03 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration