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Old 08-11-2005, 09:19 AM   #1
kratunko
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Future of Slackware


I've been a Slackware user for awhile - since ver. 9.0 till now - ver. 10.1. My admiration for this great distro is fading, stepping aside room for disappointment, loyality dissipating. Hardware is evolving with an enourmous pace. I see other distroes accomodate quickly to the new hardware system variations and optimize their distroes by use of various kernel configurations. I want to ask, where are the Slackware opimized kernels - AMD & Intel, various SMPs, 64 bit support? I see even other Slackware clones implement features I've been waiting for - 2.6.x kernel as a primary choice - Slax, 64 bit support - Slamd64. And I ask myself why Slackware does not offer support for the latest technologies and what Slackware is waiting for. Or maybe I've waited too long?
So, do you think Slackware has a future?
 
Old 08-11-2005, 09:53 AM   #2
jong357
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Slackware users prefer to do most everything themselves typically. That's one of the core concepts behind Slack IMO... No hand holding, Keep it Simple Stupid, and as Vanilla as possible leaving the customization up to the user. If you want 5,000 different bastardized kernel flavors, then switch to Fedora....

The reasons why you are disheartened with Slack is the exact reason why I love it so much...
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:02 AM   #3
SlackerLX
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Lightbulb Neverending Slackware

Yea, jong357!
Tweaking, tweaking and once more tweaking. That keeps our brain occupied and give us intellectual challenge. Slackware is one testing-your-ability magical distro. Love it!!!!!!!
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:26 AM   #4
Azmeen
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Slackware waits for and serves nobody. Most Slackware users can and usually do compile their own kernels with whatever patches they feel suitable for their setup. SMP support is again, something kernel level. As for 64-bit support, you have answered your own question by mentioning Slamd64.

By the way, nobody forced anyone to stay with Slackware. If it doesn't work for you, then hey... perhaps it's time to move on.

Does Slackware have a future... well, I'm not a fortuneteller, so I won't make any predictions. What I do know is that Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distro, so it does have a heritage.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:30 AM   #5
ingvildr
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slackware has its loyal base, but how long can this band of slackers last??? lol. Hmmm i wouldn't mind starting a poll to find out the average age of a slacker, and if its something you warm to when you want a simple life or slackware is something that will die when its base is gone.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:38 AM   #6
deww
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Not trying to start a flame war or anything, but take a look at another distribution that's "slow", Debian. Compare the official releases, Debian's even "further behind," yet they also have a massive fan base. Like others have already mentioned, you can add support to everything you say is missing yourself, or choose another distro that has already done what you want for you. Your choice.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:38 AM   #7
cythrawll
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First thing I do for any distro is compile my own kernel, I find it much easier to configure the OS once you have your own kernel in place.

For those who aren't comfortable compiling their own kernels, I would get out an old box, and experiment, and try. It isn't that difficult and I only had one incident where I tottally killed the system. It was Easily rescued however, (just booted from the old kernel).

I do wish there was official 64 bit release of slackware.

The reason why I still love slackware is the control that I don't feel or get from other distros. You don't have to wait for slackware to port anything, Just DIY!

Last edited by cythrawll; 08-11-2005 at 10:46 AM.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:39 AM   #8
SlackerLX
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Blasphemer ingvildr!

And the verdict is...
Slackware Linux is the oldest Linux distribution on the planet that's still in development and there's a reason for that (well, actually there are many). It's stable, fast, and has a reputation for the most excellent quality control in the business. Patrick Volkerding is no slouch when it comes to ensuring that no matter how new or old a package may be, it needs to be proven solid or it's just not going to be part of Slackware Linux. Period. With this kind of leadership, you simply can't go wrong.

Would I recommend it to a new Linux user? Probably not, but I can tell you I recommend it to everyone else. It has a reputation for being difficult to work with but let me assure you that this is definitely not the case. If you're not afraid to work at a console prompt you will have no worries at all with Slackware. For some reason the word "console" tends to go hand in hand with "difficult" for many people and for that I blame Microsoft. They've pushed the notion that typing is bad. The mouse is your friend. Well, folks, the bottom line is that in some cases the mouse is actually a hindrance to real productivity. That is a fact. Once you understand some of the basics, the console becomes less intimidating... and even starts to resemble a friendly face you're happy to see once you get home from your day job where they prefer to incessantly shove Windows down your throat.

If you've never tried Slackware Linux, consider this my invitation to give it a shot. Whether it's on a spare computer/partition/drive makes no difference. I think you'll be glad you did. The biggest reason that it's the worlds oldest living distro is that everyone who uses it sticks with it. Period. If you do decide to give it a shot, there's plenty of reference material on the Internet for you to make use of, as well as some great places to get help from real people. LinuxPackages.net Forums are a great place to start. The Slackware Handbook Project is another place to get some pointers, as is Alan Hicks' Slackware Book. I've included some useful links for you below. That's all for now. Until next time...

Keep Slacking!

Last edited by SlackerLX; 08-11-2005 at 10:41 AM.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:40 AM   #9
tuxdev
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Hey! I'm 15 and love slackware. I love it cause I can do anything without much complaint. Compiling your own kernel is not that hard, and its extremely fun to make the stuff that gives the most problems like sound and scanners. It won't be going away. It even has more heritage as a distro if you think of it as the modern version of the grandfather distro, SLS. I was talking to somebody who used and is still using (in an extremely hacked way) that distro at home and he said that all the distro specific stuff like aaa_base and elvis were in SLS.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:43 AM   #10
SlackerLX
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Here are some reviews as well:
http://www.osnews.com/story.php?news_id=9752
http://www.geektimelinux.com/index.php?q=node/view/208
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:47 AM   #11
SlackerLX
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Here is also overall estimation by madpenguin

"
OVERALL RATING
Target Audience: Almost Everyone
Features: Excellent
Performance: Excellent
Hardware Support: Good
Usability: Excellent
Management: Excellent
Documentation: Excellent (99% online documentation)
Worth The Asking Price: Yes
Stars 9 out of 10
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:50 AM   #12
ingvildr
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one thing about slack i do really like is its installer. A nice mix of text and ncurses it never seems hard just simple and modest unlike something like suse's yast which looks like a screen covered in rainbow sick.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:50 AM   #13
Rivitir
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I would have to say Slack is one of my favorate distros, I use it for learning and with rdesktop I'm using it to admin my windows network at work, my desktop has better uptime then my servers (no surprise). Slack I suggest to anyone that wants to really learn how Linux works.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 10:53 AM   #14
ingvildr
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Quote:
OVERALL RATING
Target Audience: Almost Everyone
Features: Excellent
Performance: Excellent
Hardware Support: Good
Usability: Excellent
Management: Excellent
Documentation: Excellent (99% online documentation)
Worth The Asking Price: Yes
Stars 9 out of 10
slacks documentation is ok, but when you look at gentoo, freebsd or openbsd's docs its clear which needs a little work.

Last edited by ingvildr; 08-11-2005 at 11:01 AM.
 
Old 08-11-2005, 12:15 PM   #15
ringwraith
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Quote:
Originally posted by ingvildr
slacks documentation is ok, but when you look at gentoo, freebsd or openbsd's docs its clear which needs a little work.
One of the pros for Slackware is that it is so vanilla, that most of the documentation provided will apply to it. So there isn't as much need for specialized instructions like the gentoo people go through to install a system.
 
  


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