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Old 05-25-2003, 12:10 PM   #1
eixem
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SU File Manager


I was wondering if there is a SU File Manager out there that I can use in RedHat-9. When I was using ManDrake one was installed with the OS. I got used to using it but now that I have RH if I want to use a graphical file manager with root permissions I have to login to my root account. Of course there is always the terminal but its nice to have both options. Any recommendations?
 
Old 05-25-2003, 12:29 PM   #2
david_ross
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Just run this from a terminal:
su - root -c nautilus
 
Old 05-25-2003, 02:39 PM   #3
eixem
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wicked... thanx man. I'll be memorizing that one for sure. After I tried the command it changed my desktop wallpaper to the one I use with my root login. Not sure if that is whats supposed to happen but its no big deal I can just switch the one in my root account. Thanks again.
 
Old 05-25-2003, 02:41 PM   #4
david_ross
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Remember that it can be dangerous using a gui with root privilages - it is MUCH easier to delete files.
 
Old 05-25-2003, 05:29 PM   #5
Satriani
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In RH KDE, just open the panel (startmenu... ;-) ), go to system and choose File Manager - Super User mode...
 
Old 05-25-2003, 07:01 PM   #6
eixem
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I'll keep that in mind Satriani if I ever decide to use KDE as my default desktop. Currently I use Gnome which has certain features that I enjoy. But thanx for the tip.

>Remember that it can be dangerous using a gui with root privilages - it is MUCH easier to delete files<

While we are on the subject.. where does Linux keep all of the critical system data? Microsoft for instance has the c:\windows as a main directory. Does linux have a similar directory or is it more complex then that?
 
Old 05-25-2003, 10:30 PM   #7
TheOther1
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Hi,

You can also do "kdesu konqueror" (or other File Manager such as nautilus of Midnight Commander) if you have KDE installed. You can do this from Gnome, Window Maker, etc.

As for critical files... They are scattered about, depending on what you consider critical. Most binaries are in:
/bin
/usr/bin
/usr/sbin
/usr/local/bin
/usr/local/sbin
/usr/bin/X11
/usr/X11R6/bin
/home/[username]/bin

and /sbin <-- where most "dangerous" binaries live like mkfs, fdisk, killall5, etc. They are only dangerous like a nail gun is dangerous. Perfectly safe if you know what you are doing and pay attention. That's not to say you couldn't reek havoc with other utilities. nice, mail, chown, mount, umount all live in /bin but can cause problems if misused. Like a hammer.

/dev contains "devices" like ports, drives, etc. Deleting these can also screw you up pretty good.

Check out your environment variables by running env in a bash shell and you will see your path.
 
Old 05-26-2003, 06:10 AM   #8
JZL240I-U
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Won't kdesu <program> work only with KDE?

Also, as I use KDE, I usually type kdesu <program> & to be rid of one window, or, using a terminal, so as not to freeze the prompt.
 
Old 05-26-2003, 07:48 AM   #9
Nerd2
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Sorry to interupt on this thread, but why does linux have so many bin directories.

i.e. what is the difference between:
/(s)bin
/usr/(s)bin
/usr/local/(s)bin

It makes it more difficult than it should surely to find programs
 
Old 05-26-2003, 08:01 AM   #10
iceman47
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nerd2
Sorry to interupt on this thread
No, that's called highjacking
 
Old 05-26-2003, 09:27 AM   #11
TheOther1
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Quote:
Originally posted by JZL240I-U
Won't kdesu <program> work only with KDE?

Also, as I use KDE, I usually type kdesu <program> & to be rid of one window, or, using a terminal, so as not to freeze the prompt.
If KDE is installed, you can use kdesu in any desktop (at least all of those I have tried; gnome, WM, Sawfish, etc). True, the & will not freeze the prompt, I was thinking of right clicking in Window Maker (my primary desktop), select run from the menu and enter kdesu [whatever] which doesn't spawn a (visible) shell and hang the prompt.


To Nerd2:

Not sure why they are scattered. That would be a good question for Linus... Probably because UNIX is based that way.

To find where a binary lives, from a shell, type which [command-goes-here]. IE: which chown will return /bin/chown (at least in RH anyway). Of course you have to have rights to the file and it has to be in your path (either explicit or inherited).
 
Old 05-26-2003, 09:35 AM   #12
JZL240I-U
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Quote:
Originally posted by TheOther1
If KDE is installed, you can use kdesu in any desktop
...
Thanks, nice to know.

Quote:
Originally posted by TheOther1
To Nerd2:
To find where a binary lives, from a shell, type which [command-goes-here]...
I prefer updatedb [once] and from then on locate. That's really fast, since it works from a database (which has to be maintained / updated periodically, usually by a cron job).

Last edited by JZL240I-U; 05-26-2003 at 09:37 AM.
 
Old 05-27-2003, 11:57 AM   #13
Satriani
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Nerd2:

The binaries are divided into four different types

The /sbin directory usually contain all "administrative" commands that are related to the system itself. (i.e. shutdown, fsck, lilo.....)

The /bin directory contains all other system-commands. (ie grep, touch, mkdir)


The /usr/sbin usually contains administrative commands for system-programs installed (useradd, groupadd etc....)

Then the /usr/bin contains all other commands.

To make it really easy, just think of the sbin directories as the directories especially for super-users...

(The above is not completely true, but it gives a nice view of the way it's setup. I think all these directories are setup this way so security is easier setup)

Also, Eixem: all are talking bout these dirs, but if I were you, I'd be very carefull in your /etc directory... This is were a lot of configuration files are...

If anyone can explain it better then me, please do so, I'm still a bit of a newbie....
 
Old 05-27-2003, 02:48 PM   #14
Nerd2
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Thanks Satriani, that helped me some.
 
  


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