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Old 10-16-2001, 05:04 AM   #1
infernal
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Registered: Oct 2001
Location: /dev/null
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Post Primary or Logical partition ?


hi people..

I just confused about which one to create,
and, why is the difference between them ?

why is that only 4 primary partitions can
be created ??

why is the best ?

edward.
 
Old 10-16-2001, 04:43 PM   #2
DMR
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Here are some links to chew on:

http://www.mobiledyne.com/pub/pcfdisk.html
http://people.mw.mediaone.net/rthamp...rtitioning.htm
http://www.blueskyinnovations.com/pdisk.html
http://www.yale.edu/pclt/BOOT/PARTITIO.HTM
 
Old 10-16-2001, 04:51 PM   #3
webtoe
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Talking quick summary

i bet that the above links are very useful but just quickly

primary partitions are the main sort of partition that you make. There is a limit to how many of these you can make (which as you said is four). To get more partitions than this you need to make logical partitions. These are basically a partition within a partition (I think that they may sometimes be referred to as extended partitions). They tend not to get used much since computers nowadays can get around the 2GB hard drive limit (which meant you had to split larger drives into partitions) and few people need to have more than 4 partitions.

If you do need more it makes little difference since logical partitions should be handled seamlessly (you won;'t really notice i don;t think)

HTH

Alex
 
Old 10-16-2001, 06:16 PM   #4
brian_eye
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Registered: Oct 2001
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primary or logical and /boot

For safety, your Linux /boot partition should be 16-32 MB, and it must be within the first 1023 cylinders or 8 GBytes of your hard drive. It does not matter whether /boot is a primary or logical partition.

You can get around the above restriction, but following the above rule will make life easier. The other Linux partitions you need to create do not care whether they are primary or logical partitions either.

You can subdivide a primary partition into many logical partitions. If you are running a dual-boot system with Linux and Windows, I believe the Windows operating system needs to be a primary partition. Other Windows partitions do not have to be a primary partition.
 
  


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