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Old 03-07-2008, 01:22 PM   #1
Lenux78
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Cool Defining Operating System Policies.


Hello Everyone,

As all you know in Windows you can define defferent policies to the Operating System..

There is something like that in Linux?. I know you could do some restrictions in /etc/pam.d but there is other way to do That?

Some friend told me that Novell have a software name sendwork or centwork I really don't remember.. anyone knows about that??

Thanks

Lenux78
 
Old 03-08-2008, 11:15 AM   #2
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenux78 View Post
As you all know in Windows you can define different policies to the Operating System..
You mean like GPOs?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenux78 View Post
There is something like that in Linux?. I know you could do some restrictions in /etc/pam.d but there is other way to do That?
Depends on what kind of policies you want to define (examples are welcome).


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lenux78 View Post
Some friend told me that Novell have a software name sendwork or centwork I really don't remember.. anyone knows about that??
No. Doesn't ring a bell. Maybe check their website.
 
Old 03-09-2008, 05:47 PM   #3
Deleriux
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Yes, there are policies like GPO but its done on a per application basis. Unlike with windows the "policies" so to speak are not all centrally put in one location.

Defining a policy for Apache would involve apache configs, whilst defining a policy for NTP would be done in the ntp.conf.

As for defining access policies to such systems, then that might involve innovative use of group permissions and/or the use of sudo or pam.
 
  


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