LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 01-26-2006, 01:50 PM   #1
joshd1982
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 47

Rep: Reputation: 15
What are the differences between distro's?



I was running red hat on my laptop but am now going to try SuSE and ubuntu to see which i prefer. this may sound like a very daft question but what exactly are the differences going to be? what will i notice in terms of functionality?
also i am aware of kde and gnome and a lot of people have preference of these. again what are the main 'real' differences?
 
Old 01-26-2006, 02:14 PM   #2
camorri
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Somewhere inside 9.9 million sq. km. Canada
Distribution: Slackware 14.1, 14.2
Posts: 5,090

Rep: Reputation: 483Reputation: 483Reputation: 483Reputation: 483Reputation: 483
First the distros. It is a good idea to know just what is the same. If two kernels are the same release, you have the same code since this is centrally controlled.

What tends to be different is the applications and tools sent with the different distros. You can look at release notes to see what release of each application is in the distro.

As for tools, this is one area of greater variance. Each distro maker may include things like wizards to configure system components. Mandriva is a good example of this type of distro. Others like Slackware provide almost no tools. Slackers like to configure things using editors on the config files directly.

Updating the system and installing applications is another area of major difference. Red Hat built the code for RPM packing installation, update and removal. Mandriva has its own similar version called URPMI. Slackware ( as far as I know ) does not have a package manager. You have to compile the source files to get the binary files to install. You have to decide which way you want to do it.

As for the desktops, KDE is said to be the most windoze like. It has a start button, desktop etc.

Gnome I have had little experience with, so I will not comment any further.

Best thing to do is install both (if you have the disk space) and see which one you like best. It is truly a personal choice.
 
Old 01-26-2006, 02:21 PM   #3
joshd1982
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Posts: 47

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
cheers for response m8

i thought that i could download everything (tools, apps etc) anyway? how many versions of the kernel are there? i know that it is ofte updated but dont know how many there are at one time so to speak
 
Old 01-26-2006, 02:38 PM   #4
Tuttle
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Wellington, NZ
Distribution: mainly slackware
Posts: 1,289

Rep: Reputation: 52
www.kernel.org

there's always 1 stable release for each version. The most popular is 2.6.* for most users but 2.4.* is still the default for some distros because of it's stability. 2.6.* is probably the best for most desktop users. My advice is to stick with the kernel you have until you have experimented and are confident with compiling *and* installing a newer one.
 
Old 01-27-2006, 09:57 AM   #5
camorri
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Somewhere inside 9.9 million sq. km. Canada
Distribution: Slackware 14.1, 14.2
Posts: 5,090

Rep: Reputation: 483Reputation: 483Reputation: 483Reputation: 483Reputation: 483
Tuttle has summed up the kernel question.

Quote:
i thought that i could download everything (tools, apps etc) anyway?
The simple answer is yes. My comments were trying to answer your original question on differences. I tried to hilight the areas you may want to consider for each distr you look at.

Various tools and apps will come with each distro. What makes them different is the type of tool ( they tend to be built by the people putting the distro together. The release of each app can also vary.

Linux is different than other OS's in that each distro is put together with a different set of objectives. There is a lot of overlap though.

My advise ( just my worth ) is pick one of the main stream distros that has a good package manager. Install it and build your experience. There are lots of threads asking 'which one should I pick'. It is a matter of preference.
 
Old 01-27-2006, 02:17 PM   #6
geeman2.0
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Location: Ontario, Canada
Distribution: Gentoo, Slackware
Posts: 345

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Slackware ( as far as I know ) does not have a package manager.
I can't let this comment stand.
Slackware DOES have a package manager called pkgtool that installs specially formatted .tgz files.
 
Old 01-27-2006, 03:28 PM   #7
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
Some advice:

Don't try to learn everything all at once. There are subtle differences between distros---and even more subtles ones between kernels---that will make NO difference to you at the beginning.

At the outset, you will be learning the new features of the various GUIs, you will learn how Linux deals with files, devices, etc.---and you will be learning (or re-learning) to appreciate and use the command-line interface (CLI).

Pick a free distro and random and dive in.
 
Old 01-27-2006, 03:50 PM   #8
muddywaters
Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Distribution: mostly mepis
Posts: 427

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by geeman2.0
I can't let this comment stand.
Slackware DOES have a package manager called pkgtool that installs specially formatted .tgz files.
Yes,but something like apt takes care of depencies. Things are just more hands on with Slackware. Part of it's charm.

To the original question. I use Mepis occassionaly which is debian like Ubuntu. My opinion fwiw:

Suse is a mature distro with excellent configuration tools. It seems to get the little things right. I haven't been able to get fonts looking as nice as Suse's with other distros.(This may be just due to a lack of knowledge on my part). Package management is a bit of a pain to setup. Not to bad though.

With Ubuntu you get to use debian repositories. This is a good thing. If gnome doesn't appeal to you there is Kubuntu. The user community seems to be very active.

Have you checked the review section of this site? Ubuntu and Suse both seem like good choices. Maybe go with the one that plays nice with your hardware?
 
Old 01-27-2006, 05:04 PM   #9
farslayer
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Willoughby, Ohio
Distribution: linuxdebian
Posts: 7,232
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 190Reputation: 190
The default install of Debian with the Desktop Environment will install Gnome and KDE. when you login to the system you can choose your session Gnome KDE windowmaker, fluxbox, etc whatever you have installed.. easy way to check out different desktop environments.
 
Old 01-27-2006, 07:29 PM   #10
Tuttle
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Wellington, NZ
Distribution: mainly slackware
Posts: 1,289

Rep: Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by geeman2.0
I can't let this comment stand.
In my opinion it had already fallen!
 
Old 01-27-2006, 07:44 PM   #11
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 7,183

Rep: Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212Reputation: 2212
Every "distributor" starts with the same basic source-code: the Linux kernel; the glibc libraries; the coreutils; the XWindows or XOrg windowing system; window-managers; desktops such as KDE and/or Gnome.

The difference, and [i]vive' la difference,[/b] is what each one of them does with it.

Each distributor targets a particular audience and tries to make "Linux" as easy to use as possible. Some distributors try to make Linux as advanced as possible. Each one of them sets a particular target-user in their sights and tries to provide them something "incredibly great."

Okay, then, there's your answer. If you're trying to learn Linux, try several diffrent distros. Ideally, have two or more machines at your disposal and periodically destroy one of them. That is how you learn.
 
Old 01-29-2006, 08:28 AM   #12
ravee
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: India
Distribution: Fedora Core 2
Posts: 83

Rep: Reputation: 15
That is an interesting question which requires an interesting answer. Check out this article to clarify your doubts about which distro is ideal one.

http://linuxhelp.blogspot.com/2005/1...-them-all.html
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Distro's Infernolinux General 10 12-10-2005 01:14 AM
Original distro's and distro's based on the originals? Moloko Linux - General 7 08-19-2005 06:37 PM
Are other distro's adding repositories so I can use yum for all my distro's? t3gah Linux - Software 4 03-21-2005 05:57 AM
Why have so many distro's? ksgill General 15 03-11-2005 10:58 AM
Different Distro's whaase Linux - Distributions 1 10-04-2002 08:34 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:44 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration