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Old 02-27-2005, 10:33 PM   #1
binkgle
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taking the plunge into linux with ubuntu


i'm going to be diving into linux, and i think i'll be going with ubuntu.

what is all this hoary, warty stuff? i downloaded warty for a64. was this a good decision?

where can i find a good install guide for ubuntu, it doesn't sound completely intuitive?

how exactly do i use apt-get?

should i instead be installing knoppix or mepis? don't need a bloated distro like suse or mandrake, i can install stuff on my own (apt-get sounds excellent )

how can i dual boot with my windows setup? i only have one hd, and may very well reinstall windows soon, but in case i don't (if i do i'll leave 10 gigs of unpartioned space for linux), what program can i use to shrink my windows partition without killing data?

when i install linux, what file system should i use?

my friend has slackware on his system (though he's gonna change soon, it's too hard for a newbie), and he will boot windows unless there is a certain floppy inserted at boot. is this possible with ubuntu?

sry for all the questions, i really want them cleared up before i start installing

edit: i've been looking firther into the a64 version, and it seems to be pretty bad compatibility wise. someone with same mobo as me (abit kv8 pro) couldn't get their onboard nic to work, and that's how i connect to the internet, so i think i'll go use the 32-bit version. i've only 512mb of ram, 64-bit wouldn't have made much of a difference, anyway.

Last edited by binkgle; 02-27-2005 at 10:35 PM.
 
Old 02-27-2005, 11:14 PM   #2
zeroz52
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First, Ubuntu is very nice. I've only been using it and linux for like 3 days. It is my fav. so far.

1. what is all this hoary, warty stuff? i downloaded warty for a64. was this a good decision?
Hoary and warty are just what name they gave to the realese. Like Win98, NT, XP. Go with warty, as I don't believ hoary is stable yet, beta.

2. where can i find a good install guide for ubuntu, it doesn't sound completely intuitive?
http://www.ubuntulinux.org/support/d...allation-amd64

3. how exactly do i use apt-get?
apt-get update this will refresh your list of avail. stuff
apt-get upgrade this will upgrade what you have to latest revs

4. should i instead be installing knoppix or mepis? don't need a bloated distro like suse or mandrake, i can install stuff on my own (apt-get sounds excellent )
Ubuntu is very straight forward good for us newbs


5. how can i dual boot with my windows setup? i only have one hd, and may very well reinstall windows soon, but in case i don't (if i do i'll leave 10 gigs of unpartioned space for linux), what program can i use to shrink my windows partition without killing data?
select the best option for you during partition stage. There are like 3 options, but are pretty logical so pick the one best for what you want.

6. when i install linux, what file system should i use?
I just let it install whatever file system it wanted. I'll worry about that at a later time.

7. my friend has slackware on his system (though he's gonna change soon, it's too hard for a newbie), and he will boot windows unless there is a certain floppy inserted at boot. is this possible with ubuntu?
Not sure on this one


sry for all the questions, i really want them cleared up before i start installing

edit: i've been looking firther into the a64 version, and it seems to be pretty bad compatibility wise. someone with same mobo as me (abit kv8 pro) couldn't get their onboard nic to work, and that's how i connect to the internet, so i think i'll go use the 32-bit version. i've only 512mb of ram, 64-bit wouldn't have made much of a difference, anyway.

The 32 bit version or warty should work fine on your system, but I'm a noob still too.

Enjoy, it is nice. Expect to do some reading to figure out some of this stuff.
 
Old 02-27-2005, 11:49 PM   #3
Wim Sturkenboom
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Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Roodepoort, South Africa
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To my knowledge, Ubuntu does not cater for resizing of existing partitions. So if you currently don't have a separate partition allocated, you first have to create space using a program like Partition Magic, fdisk and the likes.
I've read somewhere that you can use the Knoppix liveCD for that as well.

Fiddling with partitions is dangerous and can result in data loss, so make sure that your backups are up-to-date. Don't belief the stories that it will be done without dataloss, you will not be the first one who has lost data when the partitioning tool failed (e.g due to power failure).

At the end of the installation, Ubuntu will recognize that you have Windows installed and install the dual-boot option for you.
It's long ago that I installed it, but usually you're offered the option to create a boot floppy (just in case).

Oh, before I forget:
when you re-install Windows after you've installed any Linux, it will overwrite the bootsector and you will not have access to Linux anymore. You need that bootfloppy or a rescue disk to fix it.
So if a windows install is coming soon, you just as well can do it now.

Last edited by Wim Sturkenboom; 02-27-2005 at 11:54 PM.
 
Old 02-28-2005, 02:41 AM   #4
heema
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and you should check up ubuntuguide

http://www.ubuntuguide.org/
 
Old 02-28-2005, 03:04 AM   #5
mjjzf
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Yes, Knoppix and PCLinuxOS both have QTPartEd, which is a nice partition editor. It supports resizing NTFS. Please remember that Ubuntu (and the Debian-installer) REALLY wants to erase the whole disk. No Windows-style clicking-on without reading what you are asked.
 
Old 02-28-2005, 10:15 AM   #6
DeusExLinux
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Mepis' installer is also a lot more intuitive than Ubuntu's... and they are basically the same, except mepis comes with mp3 support and better hardware detection (in my case... it seems this distro was written for my laptop).... The main difference is between KDE and GNOME (but either is an apt-get away)...

If you ever want to know how to use a porgram use the man pages.... in console type: man apt-get
and it's a nice page describing what the program is capable of, and how to do everything.....

Mepis is pretty slim too, but if you really want a bare-bones distro use something like Vector, or PCLinuxOS, or even better, install Debian or Gentoo on your own (ultimate config ability with them...you decide everything... sometimes a bit too many choices) or a BSD like FreeBSD.

Ubuntu's installer can be intimidating, but if you read it, you should be fine.
I really would recommend Debian (Sarge or Sid) or a Debian Base (mepis or Ubuntu), its really up to you.

But, Ubuntu's installer really should set up the Dual boot for you, just fine (when you install the Bootloader, installer it into the MBR, or you can choose to make a boot disk)

File system, use a Journalized system (ext3, or resierfs) I use resier, as it handles smaller files better and quicker (and I'm all about speed)
 
Old 02-28-2005, 11:40 AM   #7
Snipersnest
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Ubuntu 5.04 (Hoary) was my savior! I had Fedora Core and Mandrake 10.1 before but had lots of problems with my sound cards. Hoary comes with ALSA 1.0.8 and it fixed all my sound problems on all my cards. SB Live! X Gamer, SB Audigy LS, VIA Onboard.

On thing I liked most about Ubuntu is how easy it was to install Cedega/Point2Play. All Fedora Core 3 users have major problems with "Error 21", you can fix them. But Ubuntu doesn't have this problem at all!

Nvidia drivers were EASY to install. Fedora Core 3 was much hardier for a newbie to figure out. Ubuntu has the drivers in APT-GET and has the script to edit you X config so you never have to touch anything.

Ubuntu 4.10 (Warty) didn't go well for me. X didn't work when I installed it and it made it VERY hard for me. Hoary didn't have any problems and worked out EXCELLANT!

Good Luck! I hope it goes easy for you like it did for me!
 
Old 02-28-2005, 07:32 PM   #8
binkgle
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Quote:
Originally posted by Snipersnest

Ubuntu 4.10 (Warty) didn't go well for me. X didn't work when I installed it and it made it VERY hard for me. Hoary didn't have any problems and worked out EXCELLANT!
What's X? i've heard that hoary is unstable, is this true?
 
Old 02-28-2005, 08:27 PM   #9
DeusExLinux
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at this point Hoary is pretty stable, at least as stable as most other distros (cough.. Mandrake... cough)

X is a window system

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_Window_System

Reaed that, and just so ya know, the Wikipedia can answer most questions like that (I love the wikipedia... it completes me.. I find TONS of wonderful info there!)
 
Old 02-28-2005, 11:36 PM   #10
ksgill
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Ubuntu releases have some funny names.. Its becoming increasingly popular really fast. What is the deal with it?
 
Old 03-01-2005, 06:59 AM   #11
Snipersnest
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lol I have no idea about the names....wondering that my self! But Hoary is really stable for what I use it for even though its "Alpha" right now. I use it for Cedega/Point2Play so I can play CS

I always had problems with other distros INCLUDING Ubuntu 4.10 Warty. ALSA hates me LOL But Ubuntu Hoary 5.04 fixed all my issues and I'm loving it! Hoary includes ALSA 1.0.8, so chances are any sound card is *ALMOST* supported.

LoL worst part about Ubuntu, no root access is setup at the install! LOL don't forget this command!! It'll allow you to change the root password as your user!

sudo passwd root - prompts for new Unix pw.
 
Old 03-01-2005, 07:12 AM   #12
gnube
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There are lots of distros to choose from, you do not have to use Ubuntu. Ubuntu is Mark Shuttleworth's linux distro based on Debian. Debian is really free, and really technical. I do not recommend debian, but there are other good intro linux distros out there. I have heard good things about Xandros, it is supposed to be very easy to use and look like Windows.

The largest distro, with millions of users, the weasiest install, and the best user interface is actually Mac OS X. Though it is not technically linux since it uses a different kernel, you can use linux software with fink.

Personally I like Fedora. It may have driver issues, though it shouldn't have nearly as many driver issues as debian, it still seems to be a very well supported distro.
 
Old 03-01-2005, 07:21 AM   #13
DeusExLinux
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When it comes down to it
Quote:
Personally I like Fedora. It may have driver issues, though it shouldn't have nearly as many driver issues as debian, it still seems to be a very well supported distro.
All the distro's are mainly the same, with small differences here and there. But yes, Debian's installer is quite a pain in the bum, wheras Fedora's, Mandrake's, SuSE's, and the other "user-friendly" distros. But they basically use the same kernel with a few mods here and there, and the same software, again with some mods here and there (nothing serious). It comes down to choice, and (from what I use) which one has the best support of your hardware/package management system gets you off most.

 
Old 03-01-2005, 07:22 AM   #14
Snipersnest
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Wow you don't know much about Ubuntu I guess...yes its Debian based but its EASIER to use than Fedora Core 3. Not to mention have the problems you run into on FC3 you won't have on Ubuntu for gaming.

Ok and your saying drivers....Maybe on "debian" its got bad support, but Ubuntu is REALLY updated compaired to FC3. I hate to hack on FC3 so much because I still use it, but Ubuntu makes it look like a crashing whore. Everything has worked so far for me besides an old serial mouse I was using on my server.

Ubuntu isn't for everyone, but its a good lightwieght distro for beginners to use. If you use Cedega/Point2Play for gaming, I HIGHLY suggestion Ubuntu. Not to mention you won't have to fix all those Error 21 problems Fedora Core 3 has for your games

Fedora Core 3 is good. But it'll start falling apart quickly if you don't know what your doing on the updates. FC3 is also a big bulky OS, 3-4 CDs worth. Ubuntu only makes you download 1...yes its lightwieght, the average user doesn't need all those things installed.

I don't want to start a war or anything, but personally Ubuntu is ALOT easier to start out with than FC3.
 
Old 03-01-2005, 07:40 AM   #15
GoodVibrations
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Quote:
Originally posted by OSourceDiplomat
Yes, Knoppix and PCLinuxOS both have QTPartEd
PCLinuxOS P81.a has Mandrake's DiskDrake which is a *very* easy partitiontool. Just click on the "Install pclos" icon and there you'll find DiskDrake.
 
  


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