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Old 02-04-2007, 07:20 PM   #1
kerry431
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Hi all I am sorry to be asking something that is so basic but I have been trying to install Ubuntu as a dual boot with xp Pro. Everything is fine but I seem to be stuck when it comes to the partitioning. I have a 75 gig unpartitioned hard drive which has about 35 gigs taken with my xp stuff. Do I do a partition first through xp or let ubuntu do it? Is there a step by step formula for installing?
I have gotten as far as "Manually edit partition table" in the install directions but then I get stuck.
Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
 
Old 02-04-2007, 07:52 PM   #2
J_Szucs
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"I have a 75 gig unpartitioned hard drive which has about 35 gigs taken with my xp stuff."

The smoth way is to install xp and its service packs first, but do not let it use the whole hard drive (i.e. save some unpartitioned disk space for linux).

Then start the linux installer, which will automatically use the unpartitioned space for linux, and will also install a boot manager (grub) that will let you dualboot your two systems.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 07:56 PM   #3
IBall
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Welcome to LQ!

Let Ubuntu do it.

When you say you have a 75GB hard drive, do you mean it is all partitioned as NTFS for Windows? The Ubuntu installer can resize partitions for you - but make sure that you back up your data first. Also, run "defrag" in Windows before you do anything.

In the "Manually Edit Partition Table" step, resize the Windows partition to about 40GB. Create a 10GB partition for Ubuntu's root partition, and make it ext3. Create a partition that is about 2x your RAM as a swap partition. Take the rest of the drive, and make it an ext3 partition for /home. This partition houses all of your documents and user settings, and makes it much easier to reinstall or change distros, as you don't lose all your data.

Check out this page for more.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 08:38 PM   #4
kerry431
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IBall
Welcome to LQ!

Let Ubuntu do it.

When you say you have a 75GB hard drive, do you mean it is all partitioned as NTFS for Windows? The Ubuntu installer can resize partitions for you - but make sure that you back up your data first. Also, run "defrag" in Windows before you do anything.

In the "Manually Edit Partition Table" step, resize the Windows partition to about 40GB. Create a 10GB partition for Ubuntu's root partition, and make it ext3. Create a partition that is about 2x your RAM as a swap partition. Take the rest of the drive, and make it an ext3 partition for /home. This partition houses all of your documents and user settings, and makes it much easier to reinstall or change distros, as you don't lose all your data.

Check out this page for more.
Yes it is all partitioned a s NTFS for Windows. I am not sure if I am capable of what you suggest as I am not familiar with any of the Linux terminology.

When the installer asks to do this automatically it looks like it would partition about 50/50. Is this something I should try doing. I would just like to get this thing installed so I can give it a try.

Usually I am pretty good with windows but I feel like a total dunce on this.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 08:59 PM   #5
IBall
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If the 50/50 split is OK for you, then do that.

Once you get better with Linux (and more confidant with your abilities) you can try more advanced things like separate home partitions, etc.

I still strongly recommend that you backup all your important data in Windows, and do a defrag. It is unlikely you will lose data (GParted is pretty good), but better safe than sorry.

--Ian
 
Old 02-04-2007, 09:04 PM   #6
wahming
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The easiest way, once you've backed up your data, would be to reinstall Windows with a new partition, sized maybe 50gb. Alternatively, (my choice) you could use the repartitioning tools to split your partition into multiple parts. I wouldn't recommend the 50/50 split, since it looks like you're almost at 50% usage by Win, and Windows starts grumbling when it runs low on disk space.

Also, optionally, you might want to set up a small partition formatted as vfat. This would enable you to share files between both OSes
 
Old 02-04-2007, 09:27 PM   #7
kerry431
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Thanks all, I have defragged and backed up but I think I will try to learn a bit more before I attempt this. Your right the 50/50 split doesn't look good either.
 
Old 02-04-2007, 09:35 PM   #8
wahming
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Tons of good tutes out there, if you have the time to read thru em. The basic steps are the same in all, they just differ a little on minor details. I'd recommend reading one of them, then resize your Win part. into 40-50 gb, and giving linux a shot. Best way to learn is by jumping in head-first =). Assuming the partition resize is successful, your windows will work fine no matter what, so you don't have to worry about screwing up.

Note- Do NOT install grub on your MBR, install it on your boot partition. Look for it under advanced bootloader options.
 
Old 02-05-2007, 12:33 AM   #9
IBall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahming
Note- Do NOT install grub on your MBR, install it on your boot partition. Look for it under advanced bootloader options.
Why? I generally think it is better to install to the MBR. This way, GRUB can be used to boot both Linux and Windows. It is the easiest option, provided you have Windows installed first.

As for partitioning, if the OP is willing to reinstall Windows, then I suggest getting a copy of the GParted Live CD. Boot from the CD, and create the following partitions using the graphical tool:
Windows (NTFS) - However big you need. I would say about 40 - 50 GB.
Linux / (ext3) - About 24 GB.
Linux Swap - About 2x your ram.

Then install Windows, making sure you install it to its own partition. Then install Ubuntu, telling it to use the partitions you created. You will need to use the "Manually edit the partition table" option. Ubuntu will detect Windows, and install GRUB to the MBR and allow you to select either Windows or Linux when you boot your computer.

--Ian
 
Old 02-05-2007, 12:46 AM   #10
Hitboxx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian
Why? I generally think it is better to install to the MBR. This way, GRUB can be used to boot both Linux and Windows. It is the easiest option, provided you have Windows installed first.
I second that, installing in MBR makes more sense while dual booting at least from my point of view, though it may depend on individual interests.
 
Old 02-05-2007, 01:03 AM   #11
wahming
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Mmm, grub on the MBR makes for a more convenient installation, I concur. It's just that for me, I tend to reinstall Windows quite often, and everytime I do that, the MBR (and grub, along with it) gets erased. So I tend to concede the MBR to Windows. But yeah, there really shouldn't be a major difference to kerry's system either way.

Iball - Why repartition before reinstalling Win? WinXP installer comes with a partitioning tool, after all. Just curious.
 
Old 02-05-2007, 01:17 AM   #12
IBall
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wahming
Iball - Why repartition before reinstalling Win? WinXP installer comes with a partitioning tool, after all. Just curious.
How flexible and easy is it. It has been a very long time since I installed Windows...
Most people I know use either Partition Magic or GParted Live CD to do the partitioning, and then install Windows. Any Windows partitioner certainly can't create Linux partitions for you, although the Linux installer will format partitions appropriately.

--Ian
 
Old 02-05-2007, 01:22 AM   #13
wahming
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It only does NTFS/vfat partitions, but it does allow you to create and delete fixed-size partitions, which is all you really need in order to leave linux some space. The ext parts can be set up later by the linux installer.
 
Old 02-05-2007, 02:29 AM   #14
J_Szucs
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Well, so his drive is not unpartitioned; it is fully occupied by an ntfs partition.
Then
1. Backup critical data on ntfs under XP
2. Defrag ntfs under XP
3. Chkdsk ntfs under XP
4. Run the linux installer, and
5. Let it
a) shrink the ntfs partition
b) create at least a swap and an ext3 (/) partition for ubuntu
c) optionally create an other ext3 (/home) and a vfat partition (to be mounted anywhere) for easy file sharing with XP, too
d) install grub in MBR for dual booting

I did it several times. It is easy and safe. The only time when it was unsuccessful, was when qtparted did not want to shrink the ntfs partition, because it had file system errors. XP's scandisk reported no errors, but those were there, and I had to reboot and find and fix them with XP's chkdsk command before I could proceed with the linux installation.
 
Old 02-05-2007, 02:16 PM   #15
Duck2006
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Quote:
As IBall has posted

As for partitioning, if the OP is willing to reinstall Windows, then I suggest getting a copy of the GParted Live CD. Boot from the CD, and create the following partitions using the graphical tool:
Windows (NTFS) - However big you need. I would say about 40 - 50 GB.
Linux / (ext3) - About 24 GB.
Linux Swap - About 2x your ram.
I use this way to set up my linux partitions and find it easy this way.
 
  


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