LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-18-2011, 10:31 PM   #16
Sumguy
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2010
Location: Rural Kentucky, USA.
Distribution: Slackware; Crunchbang.
Posts: 409
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 98

Pcardout,

I've been running
Code:
/home/bob/Downloads/hp3900-series_0.12/INSTALL.sh
I just keep getting the "unary operator" message the "presupposes SANE already installed" (it is installed).

Here is what the README says:

Quote:
A normal installation for known linux distros would use INSTALL.sh script. These
distros are: Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and SuSE.

For these ones, there are compiled binaries ready to install. For any other
distro, hp3900-series project needs to be compiled.


Steps to install project
------------------------

- Just type ./INSTALL.sh as root

- You have to select if you want to install the SANE backend or the stand-alone
application.

- Then you have to select your linux distro. If your distro is listed, you won't
need to compile project because there are compiled binaries ready to install.

- If your distro is not listed you have to compile sources, selecting "Others"
option. This option, executes COMPILE.sh script which will compile project.


Compiling project
-----------------

COMPILE.sh has been writen to compile hp3900-series project. If your distro is
listed in INSTALL.sh script you can skip this step but may be you want to
compile sources by yourself. If so, keep on reading.

- The first step is to select if you want to compile stand-alone application or
SANE backend. This step is skipped when COMPILE.sh script is called from INSTALL.sh

- By default, hp3900 sources are included so, stand-alone application can be
compiled at the moment. But, to compile project as a backend you need SANE
project sources, and such sources are not included in this package. So, if you
select to compile project as a SANE backend, and sources are not already
downloaded, script will call UPDATE.sh to download them.

Note: To compile hp3900-series, libtiff-dev and libusb-dev packages are needed.
If you have a debian distro you can install typing next command:
apg-get install libtiff4-dev libusb-dev
 
Old 05-19-2011, 03:11 AM   #17
pcardout
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Socorro, New Mexico
Distribution: Debian ("lenny", "squeeze"), Linux Mint, XUbuntu
Posts: 218

Rep: Reputation: 24
Not very much to go on. And have you tried the alternate form of the command I wrote about in the last post?
 
Old 05-19-2011, 03:35 AM   #18
pcardout
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Socorro, New Mexico
Distribution: Debian ("lenny", "squeeze"), Linux Mint, XUbuntu
Posts: 218

Rep: Reputation: 24
Also -- this group has gotten you to the point where you can see what your errors are ... but I haven't seen anyone who has experience with the device.

I had trouble with an HP printer (but I got it eventually by figuring out how to work with hplip).
I found the following thread on Ubuntu fora which is specific to your scanner.

http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/inde...t-1436658.html

You should check it out.

There are a couple things in those posts that caught my eye.

1) You may not have permission to use the scanner (you edit the file /etc/groups and add bob to saned).
2) You may not have permission to use the USB port.
3) They called the install scripts with options ./INSTALL.sh --type 2 --adistro

I would assume that the script ASKED you what your distro was ... but it looks like you can specify it manually. I'm rather sure that "adistro" does not
really mean "adistro" it probably means you should type "ubuntu" or something like that ...

Or you could throw up your hands. You are in the deep end. Installing new devices can be a pain in the neck. It usually just works ...
If there is really no more documentation, the script itself may well have some documentation in it. I frankly haven't bothered to go read through
the script.

One difference between Win and Linux is that the linux support lags a couple years behind the new hardware. You are almost better off finding used stuff
for which all the drivers have already been seamlessly integrated and you don't have to go through this. There are also hardware compatability lists.
Generally HP stuff works well, but the level of support for linux is fairly low, they assume users are pretty advanced and can figure stuff out.
 
Old 05-19-2011, 11:45 AM   #19
Sumguy
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2010
Location: Rural Kentucky, USA.
Distribution: Slackware; Crunchbang.
Posts: 409
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 98
Thanks, Pcardout!

Doing the command in post #15 did it!

Quote:
hp3900-series 0.12 - INSTALLER
...
- Installation ends succesfully...
I'm going to read the post that you linked to, also, later, for a better understanding.

Just last week, I installed a Brother laser printer- the driver was a .deb file, and it installed without a hitch in 2 seconds. I don't know why this one was such a problem. What irks me, is that there seems to be no standardization when it comes to installing these .tar.gs's....

If there were only some standard procedure, or something one could go to for a detailed explanation of what to do.....but it seems that tyhese installations are different with every individual file. This is the most trouble I've ever had since I started using Linux......most other problems were minor and easily fixed through common sense or by asking here...but this was something else! And it's not like I didn't read the manual...... The manual just said "type ./INSTALL.sh (naturally I assumed that I had to specify it's location)....

I'm adding the command from post 15 into my "command line notebook" for future reference. -Amazing- I couldn't find such info anywhere else- I think that is what scares people away from CLI- because unless you know little tricks like this which the manual doesn't tell you....you're SOL.

Anywho...the ordeal is over! And I thank you and everyone else who replied, very much.

The bad news is: This was supposed to be a refurbished printer...but it is not- it is merely used, and it doesn't work very well- it severely underexposes everything and the quality is horrible (and these have a reputation for being good scanners)- so after all this trouble...I have a POS scanner anyway......

This just isn't my week!

But as always, it gives me the warm fuzzies knowing that so many fellow Linuxers are always willing to help.

THANKS, everyone!!
 
Old 05-19-2011, 12:06 PM   #20
pcardout
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Socorro, New Mexico
Distribution: Debian ("lenny", "squeeze"), Linux Mint, XUbuntu
Posts: 218

Rep: Reputation: 24
Well HALLELUJAH!

It gives me a warm fuzzy to hear that the thing actually worked.

You are correct that there is a level of sophistication that is assumed in a lot of Linux info, and it takes a couple of years of effort to get there. Ubuntu is a good thing in that it has brought in a lot of relatively inexperienced users ... and it mostly just works.
The downside is when it does not work it dumps Noobs in at the deep-end with no idea what they are in for.

So, since I'm on a victory lap, let me expound.

Linux has always had a special user, called the "root" user. (Not to be confused with the root of the file system, the directory /).
This user is the user that installs software, period. (This provision by itself protects linux against many windows-like virus attacks). Other users do not have this privilege. It is assumed you know this in all documentation.
Ubuntu has muddied the waters by disabling the root user by default and letting ordinary users have root privileges via sudo.
This is the first thing that bothers me about ubuntu, and what you should know. In fact, in the future, you might want to enable
your root user. From a command line type "sudo passwd root". You will enter your password (for bob) then a new (possibly different ... your
choice) passwd for root. In the future, rather than use sudo at all, just type "su" and then the password for root when you are asked.
Then all the stuff that says "as root user", you just do it. You do not ever need to use sudo again. You should read more about
root before you do this. Remember that when you are root you are a different person than when you are bob.

Second of all, you need to read about Paths. http://www.linfo.org/path_env_var.html
You must understand that Linux does not know where to look for a command unless it is in your path, or unless
you tell it where to look. However, it does know what directory it is in. (Type pwd sometime ...).
Your god-forsaken script ASSUMED that you were executing it from the directory that contained it.
The construct ./INSTALL.sh means. "Look in this directory, you dummy!". This is not an unusual assumption. It is not surprising that
it is not documented for Noobs. I have before wanted to create a "noob tips and tricks" manual. Since I am no longer a noob, it is
getting harder for me to see with those eyes. If you want to contribute yours to it, e-mail me pcardoutATgmail.com, I will probably
publish it on the web.

PS -- Feel free to officially "thank" me using the linuxquestions thank facility -- when I work for money, I charge $150/hr as a consultant.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-20-2011, 12:49 AM   #21
Sumguy
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2010
Location: Rural Kentucky, USA.
Distribution: Slackware; Crunchbang.
Posts: 409
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 98
Ah, yes, my friend- I learned of the root business my very first day using Ubuntu, -on this forum, of course.

I remember all the dire warnings as to why I should not operate as root (as a new user), but I did it, and all went well. (Still using my initial install of Ubuntu- for almost a year now)

I would love to collaborate with you, as far as producing a tips and tricks guide for noobs. Consider my vast ignorance at your disposal!

It will most likely be a few days before I email, as I'm quite busy at the moment.

Coincidentally, I am planning on trying out Debian in the near future, so I'm sure I could provide a true almost virgin "noob" experience.

I have read various introductions to Linux for noobs, so I am familiar with what is missing from them- from the noob's perspective, which, if rectified would make things vastly easier for the beginner.

I am musing right now about how even a problem, such as described in this thread, can turn into something beneficial in the Linux world.

Oh, and yes, I do need to read about paths. I tend to skip things like that initially (paths, directories), figuring that I can figure such things out as I go. I like to get to the heart of the matter right away- but naturally, I thus end up neglecting some very basic information that could be basic and critical- like learning to read without first learning the alphabet.
 
Old 05-20-2011, 11:08 AM   #22
Sumguy
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2010
Location: Rural Kentucky, USA.
Distribution: Slackware; Crunchbang.
Posts: 409
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcardout View Post
One difference between Win and Linux is that the linux support lags a couple years behind the new hardware. You are almost better off finding used stuff
for which all the drivers have already been seamlessly integrated and you don't have to go through this. There are also hardware compatability lists.
Generally HP stuff works well, but the level of support for linux is fairly low, they assume users are pretty advanced and can figure stuff out.
That's the irony- this is actually an older scanner- This model has been around for quite some time (I don't think it is still in production, even)- I bought it as a refurb- turns out, it is just used- and a POS at that (Not the model..just this particular one).

I've sent you an email re the noob tips and tricks.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Get specific file from tar dnaqvi Linux - Newbie 12 10-22-2009 05:55 PM
tar extract specific directory lrt Linux - Software 7 12-01-2007 08:40 AM
Is it possible to unpack a *.tar into a specific directory whammack Linux - Software 3 01-29-2007 06:04 PM
Ignore specific sub directories when using tar MicahCarrick Linux - Software 4 11-16-2006 09:59 AM
How To extract .tar.gz To A Specific Directory? George2 Linux - Software 4 02-18-2006 07:01 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:01 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration