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Old 07-25-2011, 01:51 PM   #1
electronicengr
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Registered: Jul 2011
Location: Pakistan
Distribution: Red Hat, Ubuntu
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Question Precise Tutorial about linux commands and pakage Installation, assuming no OS concept


Hello Friends
This is my first post at LQ. There are so many tutorials and books on linux, but they are either too basic (ls, rm, cd etc) or they are advanced and rely on OS concepts such as file systems etc...
What I want to learn is the following:

=>I want to learn linux but i dont know OS basics such as 'mounting' etc

=>I dont want to learn any graphical tools, I am solely interested in command line.

=>Coming from MS Windows, I dont have the idea of how softwares are installed on linux (I suspect they are compiled in linux rather than installed the way in Windows)

=>Being an electronic engg student I want to learn linux for embedded programming i.e AVR-GCC etc and EDA tools. But that requires knowledge of GCC tool chain and I am affraid of that.

<= I want to learn all these in not more than 500 pages initially.
 
Old 07-25-2011, 02:04 PM   #2
knudfl
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Registered: Jan 2008
Location: Copenhagen, DK
Distribution: pclos2016, Slack14.1 Deb Jessie, + 50+ other Linux OS, for test only.
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Welcome to LQ.

Rute http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

man slackpkg http://www.slackpkg.org/documentation.html
man apt-get http://linux.die.net/man/8/apt-get
man yum http://linux.die.net/man/8/yum
man pacman http://www.archlinux.org/pacman/pacman.8.html
etc. etc.
Being an Electronics Engineer : Jump into using an OS.
You will not be able to remember all 2000 commands and thousands of options.
Will be easier memorized by using the commands numerous times. .. ..

Quote:
GCC tool chain
Install gcc-c++, and you have it.

And the tool chain, recommended for cross compiling ( For an "embedded Linux ) :
crosstool-NG http://crosstool-ng.org/
http://sourceware.org/ml/crossgcc/2011-04/

..

Last edited by knudfl; 07-25-2011 at 06:35 PM.
 
Old 07-25-2011, 07:16 PM   #3
chrism01
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Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Sydney
Distribution: Centos 6.8, Centos 5.10
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It will also help if you post (& add to your profile) which distribution/version of Linux you are going to use eg Centos, Fedora, Ubuntu etc.
See www.distrowatch.com.

BTW, if you stick to the built in pkg mgr for your distro, it does just install the binaries & cfgs.
You won't (usually) need to get into compiling from scratch just yet ... maybe later.

The Rute tutorial above is very good.
Here's a couple of links to manuals for bash (default cmd env)
http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-G...tml/index.html
http://www.tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/

There's a load of HOWTO etc manuals here www.linuxtopia.org
 
Old 07-25-2011, 07:42 PM   #4
pljvaldez
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Additionally, if you select Debian as your distro, there's a good tutorial online at www.aboutdebian.com.
 
Old 07-25-2011, 07:55 PM   #5
paulsm4
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Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: SusE 8.2
Posts: 5,863
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Hi -

1) Linux commands ("cat", "ls", "cd", "pwd", etc) are one thing.

2) Basic shell scripting (rolling a few commands together into the moral equivalent of a DOS .bat file) is another thing.

3) And the details about how to compile, link, load executables and debug on your embedded platform of choice is yet a third thing.

As far as "1) basic Linux commands", this is a really good primer:

http://tldp.org/LDP/intro-linux/html/chap_02.html

4) As far as the "big picture" (how all the pieces fit together) with regard to your embedded system, I believe this book might be worth its weight in gold:

Quote:
Embedded Linux Primer, Christopher Hallinan
Another good book (albeit significantly older) is:

Quote:
Building Embedded Linux Systems, Karim Yaghmour, et al
I own (and thoroughly marked up ) both books.
 
Old 07-25-2011, 09:23 PM   #6
frankbell
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Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mint, OpenBSD
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Here are three good references:

http://linux.about.com/. It's oriented to Ubuntu, but it's full of good info.

http://tille.garrels.be/training/tldp/. Machtelt Garrels Intro to Linux.

http://www.slackbook.org/. Slackware oriented, but excellent on the basics, such as file structure, permissions, and the like.
 
Old 07-27-2011, 12:49 PM   #7
salasi
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Registered: Jul 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by electronicengr View Post
There are so many tutorials and books on linux, but they are either too basic (ls, rm, cd etc) or they are advanced and rely on OS concepts such as file systems etc...

OK, first up, there is an amount of pain (well, inconvenience, anyway) in learning any new, complex, thing. what you need to do is handle it in manageable lumps. Learn some stuff and build on what you have learnt.

i think when you mention file systems, you mean hierarchy/organisation
http://www.pathname.com/fhs/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filesys...archy_Standard

If you mean something else, please comment further.

Quote:
Originally Posted by electronicengr View Post
=>I want to learn linux but i dont know OS basics such as 'mounting' etc
If you read 'mounting' as 'making available for use', that might help. (Did I need to add '...and unmounting as making unavailable for use, in an organised way...', or not?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by electronicengr View Post
=>Coming from MS Windows, I dont have the idea of how softwares are installed on linux (I suspect they are compiled in linux rather than installed the way in Windows)
For most distros, there will be one (or more) application installers. You have, however, said that you don't want any of this GUI nonsense (my paraphrase) and that's ok, too.

http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?res...age-management

A warning; the GUI versions of package installers are usually easier to get started with than the command line ones (but you can argue that the command line ones are 'more powerful', if that's meaningful), but you have made your decision. In any case, while distros differ a bit in
  • how packages are organised
  • which packages are available by default
  • how comprehensive the list of packages is
  • how up-to-date packages are
the general principle is easy; you go into the package manager (either GUI, or on the command line), say what you want and it sorts it out (assuming a network connection and all the usual sort of things).

Quote:
Originally Posted by electronicengr View Post
=>Being an electronic engg student I want to learn linux for embedded programming i.e AVR-GCC etc and EDA tools. But that requires knowledge of GCC tool chain and I am affraid of that.
Don't fear the toolchain (ooh, oooh, etc). You are going to make some mistakes, you might as well getting on with making the mistakes and learning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by electronicengr View Post
<= I want to learn all these in not more than 500 pages initially.
So, you've decided to limit your initial learning at 500 pages worth? OK, but look back at this afterwards, and see whether that was helpful, or not. In the interim:
  • man
  • man -k
 
  


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